Parlance
Get Parlance essential facts below. View Videos or join the Parlance discussion. Add Parlance to your Like2do.com topic list for future reference or share this resource on social media.
Parlance

English

Etymology

From Anglo-Norman parlance, parlaunce, from parler ("to talk") + -ance.

Pronunciation

Noun

parlance (countable and uncountable, plural parlances)

  1. A certain way of speaking, of using words, especially when it comes to those with a particular job or interest.
    • 1836, James Fenimore Cooper, "Eclipse":
      To my childish fancy, it had seemed an imaginary flag-staff, or, in rustic parlance, the "liberty pole" of some former generation [...]
    • 1845, Charles Miner, History of Wyoming, Letter IX:
      We approach the contest, still known in the common parlance of the country, as "the first Pennimite War."
    • 1909, William Elliot Griffis, The Story of New Netherland, Chapter 22:
      The tourist's impression of the country to-day is that of a transported Holland, in which the official language is Dutch and the parlance of the people is "taki-taki."
  2. (archaic, rare) Speech, discussion or debate.

Synonyms

Translations

Anagrams


Old French

Alternative forms

Etymology

parler +? -ance, or from an unattested Latin word.

Noun

parlance f (oblique plural parlances, nominative singular parlance, nominative plural parlances)

  1. discussion; debate

Descendants

References


  This article uses material from the Wikipedia page available here. It is released under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share-Alike License 3.0.


parlance
 



 

Top US Cities