1954 in Baseball
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1954 in Baseball

The following are the baseball events of the year 1954 throughout the world.

Champions

Major League Baseball

Other champions

Winter Leagues

Awards and honors

Statistical leaders

  American League National League
Type Name Stat Name Stat
AVG Bobby Ávila CLE .341 Willie Mays NYG .345
HR Larry Doby CLE 32 Ted Kluszewski CIN 49
RBI Larry Doby CLE 126 Ted Kluszewski CIN 141
Wins Bob Lemon CLE &
Early Wynn CLE
23 Robin Roberts PHP 23
ERA Mike Garcia CLE 2.64 Johnny Antonelli NYG 2.30

Major league baseball final standings

Events

January

February

  • February 19 - The Brooklyn Dodgers signed 19-year-old Roberto Clemente to a one year deal with $5,000, including a $10,000 signing bonus. The Dodgers thus beat out a number of other clubs in the Clemente sweepstakes, as they outspent their cross-river rivals New York Giants and New York Yankees, who had already intention on inking Clemente. Besides, the Dodgers also beat the Milwaukee Braves to the punch, as they offered Clemente more money to sign there. He was assigned immediately to Triple A Montreal Royals. The future Hall of Famer put up decent but not spectacular numbers for them, posting a .257/.286/.372 batting line with ten extra base hits and one stolen base in 155 plate appearances. Unfortunately for the Dodgers, Clemente would never play a game in the organization. At the end of the season, Brooklyn left him exposed to the Rule V Draft, where he was selected by the Pittsburgh Pirates. Clemente would never play another game in the Minor Leagues.[1]

March

  • March 13 - Milwaukee Braves outfielder Bobby Thomson breaks his ankle while sliding into a base during a spring training game. Thomson, whose pennant-winning three-run home run for the New York Giants in 1951 is known as the ´´Shot Heard 'Round the World´´, will be out until July 14th. In between, he is immediately replaced by a promising prospect named Hank Aaron.[2][3]
  • March 29 - Chicago Cubs manager Phil Cavarretta gives team owner Phil Wrigley an honest assessment of the chances for the Cubs during the season, and is then dismissed for his defeatist attitude. As a result, Cavarreta became the first manager ever to be given the gate during spring training. Stan Hack replaces him, even though Cavarretta is right: the Cubs will finish in seventh place this year.

April

May

  • May 2 - At Sportsman's Park, Stan Musial of the St. Louis Cardinals hits five home runs in a doubleheader against the New York Giants. He hits three in the first game, won by the Cardinals 10-6, and adds two in the nightcap, won by the Giants 9-7. Nate Colbert of the San Diego Padres will tie Musial's record by hitting five home runs in a 1972 doubleheader; coincidentally, he had been in attendance to watch Musial's feat.

June

July

August

  • August 1 - Gil Hodges belted his 13th career grand slam to establish a new record in the National League. This would also be the last grand slam in the history of the Brooklyn Dodgers club.

September

October

  • October 2 - The New York Giants defeat the Cleveland Indians, 7-4, in Game 4 of the 1954 World Series to win their fifth World Championship, four games to none. Cleveland finished the season with an American League record 111 wins which they will hold for 44 years, but failed to win a Series game. This is the first title for the Giants in 21 years. They would not win another World Series until 2010, more than 50 years after they moved to San Francisco.
  • October 28 - The Major League owners vote down the sale of the Athletics to a Philadelphia syndicate. A week later, Arnold Johnson buys a controlling interest in the Athletics from the Connie Mack family for 3.5 million dollars and moves the team to Kansas City.

November

December

Births

January

February

March

April

May

June

July

August

September

October

November

December

Deaths

January

February

  • February   1 - Norman Plitt, 60, pitcher who played with the Brooklyn Robins and New York Giants in part of two seasons spanning 1918-1927.
  • February   4 - Ollie Smith, 88, outfielder who played for the Louisville Colonels in the 1894 season.
  • February   5 - Ed Warner, 64, pitcher for the 1912 Pittsburgh Pirates.
  • February 10 - Heinie Berger, 72, one of the many German baseball players in the early part of the 20th century, who pitched from 1905 through 1910 for the Cleveland Naps of the American League.
  • February 13 - Walter Ancker, 60, pitcher who played briefly for the Philadelphia Athletics in the 1915 season.
  • February 15 - John Callahan, 79, pitcher for the St. Louis Browns of the National League in the 1898 season.
  • February 15 - John Gillespie, 53, pitcher who appeared in 31 games for the Cincinnati Reds during the 1922 season.
  • February 16 - Red Parnell, 48, All-Star left fielder and manager in the Negro Leagues, most notably for the Philadelphia Stars club from 1936 to 1943.
  • February 20 - Sadie McMahon, 86, 19th century pitcher who played for the Philadelphia Athletics, Baltimore Orioles and Brooklyn Bridegrooms in a span of nine seasons from 1889 through 1897, sporting a 173-127 record and a 3.51 ERA in 351 games, while leading the American Association in wins (36), strikeouts (291), games pitched (60) and innings (509) during the 1890 season.
  • February 22 - Chief Wilson, 70, outfielder best known for setting the single-season record for triples in 1912 with 36, a record that still stands, who played for the Pittsburgh Pirates and St. Louis Cardinals during nine seasons from 1908-1916, and was also a member of the 1909 World Series Champion Pirates.

March

April

  • April 15 - Chick Holmes, 58, pitcher for the Philadelphia Athletics during the 1918 season.
  • April 19 - Red Gunkel, 60, pitcher who played in 1916 for the Cleveland Indians.

May

  • May   4 - Otto McIvor, 69, outfielder for the 1911 St. Louis Cardinals.
  • May   7 - Les Channell, 68, backup outfielder who played with the New York Highlanders in the 1910 season and for the New York Yankees in 1914.
  • May 10 - Eddie Files, 70, pitcher who played with the Philadelphia Athletics during the 1908 season.
  • May 11 - Dorsey Riddlemoser, 78, pitcher for the 1899 Washington Senators.
  • May 17 - Roy Parker, 58, pitcher who played briefly for the St. Louis Cardinals in the 1919 season, just after serving in the United States Navy during World War I.
  • May 17 - Earl Tyree, 64, catcher for the 1914 Chicago Cubs.
  • May 22 - Chief Bender, 70, Hall of Fame Native American pitcher who won 212 games and hurled a no-hitter, while starring for three Philadelphia Athletics World Series Champion teams, being also the first pitcher in a World Series of six games to throw three complete games.[7]
  • May 23 - Bill Davidson, 70, outfielder who played with the Chicago Cubs in 1909, and for the Brooklyn Superbas and Dodgers teams from 1910 to 1911.
  • May 24 - Charlie Biggs, 47, pitcher who played for the Chicago White Sox in 1932.

June

  • June   1 - George Caithamer, 43, catcher for the 1934 Chicago White Sox.
  • June   1 - Vern Duncan, 64, center fielder who played with the Philadelphia Phillies in 1913 and for the Baltimore Terrapins from 1914 to 1915.
  • June   3 - Zaza Harvey, 75, outfielder who played from 1900 through 1902 for the Chicago Orphans, Chicago White Sox and Cleveland Bronchos.
  • June   8 - Tom O'Hara, 73, outfielder for the St. Louis Cardinals in the 1906 and 1907 seasons.
  • June 15 - Lew Carr, 81, utility infielder for the 1901 Pittsburgh Pirates.
  • June 23 - Red Massey, 63, outfielder who played with the Boston Braves in the 1918 season.
  • June 26 - Charlie Pick, 66, infielder who played with four different teams in part of six seasons spanning 1914-1920, most notably for the 1918 National League champion Chicago Cubs.

July

  • July   8 - Wiley Taylor, 66, pitcher who played from 1911 through 1914 for the Detroit Tigers, Chicago White Sox and St. Louis Browns.
  • July 13 - Ed Porray, 65, pitcher for the 1914 Buffalo Buffeds, who is best known as being the only Major League player born at sea.
  • July 13 - Grantland Rice, 73, sportswriter.
  • July 15 - Chris Mahoney, 69, pitcher and outfielder for the 1910 Boston Red Sox.
  • July 16 - Jack Bracken, 73, pitcher who played for the Cleveland Blues in 1901.
  • July 28 - Jim Bagby, 64, Cleveland Indians star pitcher who led the American League with 31 victories in 1920, defeating the Detroit Tigers, 10-1, in a clinching game for the pennant, then defeating the Brooklyn Robins in the 1920 World Series, 8-1, while hitting the first home run by a pitcher in World Series history, en route to a world championship for the Indians.[8]
  • July 29 - Babe Borton, 65, first baseman who played for the Chicago White Sox, New York Yankees, St. Louis Terriers and St. Louis Browns in part of four seasons between 1912 and 1916.

August

  • August   3 - Art Hoelskoetter, 71, utility man who played all nine positions in his four seasons for the St. Louis Cardinals from 1905-1908, though he played at least 15 games at all the positions, except only one game in left field.[9]
  • August 14 - Fabian Kowalik, 46, who pitched with four teams in a span of three seasons from 1932-1936, mainly for the 1935 NL Champion Chicago Cubs.
  • August 29 - Jack Ferry, 67, pitcher for the Pittsburgh Pirates from 1910 to 1913.

September

  • September   1 - Wimpy Quinn, 36, pitcher for the Chicago Cubs in 1941, who later played and managed in the Minor Leagues with the Bakersfield Indians.
  • September   2 - Fred Osborn, 70, center fielder for the Philadelphia Phillies over parts of three seasons from 1907-1909.
  • September   5 - Maurice Archdeacon, 55, center fielder who played from 1923 through 1925 for the Chicago White Sox.
  • September 13 - Roy Grimes, 61, twin brother of first baseman Ray Grimes, who played briefly for the New York Giants in their 1920 season.
  • September 21 - Herbie Moran, 70, right fielder who played with four clubs in a span of seven seasons from 1908-1915, most prominently for the 1914 Boston Braves Miracle Team, who, as heavy underdogs, won the National League pennant and later swept the heavily favored Philadelphia Athletics in four straight games to clinch the 1914 World Series.
  • September 23 - John Wilson, 64, who pitched in three games for the Washington Senators during its 1913 season.

October

  • October   5 - Oscar Charleston, 57, Hall of Fame Negro Leagues outfielder and manager, a powerful hitter who could hit to all fields and bunt, steal a hundred bases a year, hit over .300 consistently, and cover center field as well as anyone.[10]
  • October   6 - Josh Devore, 66, outfielder for the Cincinnati Reds, Philadelphia Phillies, New York Giants and Boston Braves during seven season from 1908 to 1914, who arrived in time for the Miracle Braves stretch run which saw them win the National League pennant and the 1914 World Series.
  • October 12 - Walter Holke, 61, first baseman for the New York Giants, Boston Braves, Philadelphia Phillies and Cincinnati Reds in part of 11 seasons spanning 1914-1925, who holds the record for the most fielding chances by a player in a game with 43, 42 put-outs and one assist during a 26-inning, 1-1 tie game between the Boston Braves and the Brooklyn Robins on May 1, 1920.[11]
  • October 14 - Bill Swanson, 66, backup infielder for the 1914 Boston Red Sox.
  • October 19 - Dave Davenport, 64, pitcher for the Cincinnati Reds, St. Louis Terriers and St. Louis Browns from 1914 through 1919, who posted a 22-18 record and 2.20 ERA while playing for the Terriers of the Federal League in 1915, leading also the league in games (55), starts (46), complete games (30), shutouts (10), strikeouts (229) and innings (392 2/3 ).[12]
  • October 19 - Hugh Duffy, 87, Hall of Fame center fielder who batted a record .438 average in 1894, one of the top hitters of the 1890s that recorded more hits, home runs and runs batted in than any other player in the game, while also teaming with fellow Hall of Famer Tommy McCarthy to form the called Heavenly Twins outfield tandem for the Boston Beaneaters, which captured two National League pennants and a pre-modern World Series Championship in 1892 and 1893.[13]
  • October 21 - Art Gardiner, 54, pitcher who appeared in just one game with the Philadelphia Phillies in the 1923 season.
  • October 22 - Earl Whitehill, 54, dominant left-handed pitcher with four teams from 1923 to 1939, while helping the Washington Senators win the American League pennant in 1933, whose 218 career wins ranks him 79th in Major League history.

November

  • November   7 - Art Bues, 66, third baseman who played with the Boston Braves in the 1913 season and for the Chicago Cubs in 1914.
  • November   7 - Charlie Frisbee, 80, backup outfielder for the Boston Beaneaters and New York Giants between 1899 and 1900.
  • November 20 - Hod Fenner, 57, pitcher who played for the Chicago White Sox in the 1921 seaoson.
  • November 21 - Uel Eubanks, 51, pitcher for the 1922 Chicago Cubs.
  • November 22 - Charlie Gibson, 75, catcher who played in 1905 for the Philadelphia Athletics.
  • November 26 - Bill Doak, 63, pitcher for three different clubs in a span of sixteen seasons from 1912-1929, eleven of them with the St. Louis Cardinals, who won 20 games in 1920 and twice led the National League in ERA in 1914 and 1921.
  • November 27 - Nick Maddox, 68, pitcher who posted a 43-20 record and 2.29 earned run average from 1907-1910 for the Pittsburgh Pirates, who threw a two-hit, 14-strikeout 4-0 shutout in his debut against the St. Louis Cardinals, and later in the season hurled a 2-1 no-hitter against the Brooklyn Superbas, becoming the youngest pitcher ever to throw a no-hitter in Major League history at the age of 20 years and ten months, which was also the first no-hit game ever thrown by a Pittsburgh Pirates pitcher.[14]
  • November 29 - Al Lawson, 85, pitcher for the Boston Beaneaters and Pittsburgh Alleghenys during the 1890 season, who later went on to play a pioneering role in the U.S. aircraft industry.

December

  • December   1 - Kid O'Hara, 78, outfielder for the Boston Beaneaters in the 1904 season.
  • December   4 - Tony Madigan, 86, pitcher for the 1886 Washington Nationals of the National League.
  • December   5 - Russ Christopher, 37, pitcher who played from 1942 through 1948 with the Philadelphia Athletics and Cleveland Indians, including the 1948 World Champion Indians.
  • December  9 - Bill McGowan, 58, Hall of Fame American League umpire who officiated over 30 years and worked in eight World Series, including a string of 2,541 consecutive games in which he did not miss a single inning between 1925 and 1942.[15]
  • December 11 - Harry Courtney, 56, who pitched from 1919 to 1922 for the Washington Senators and Chicago White Sox.
  • December 17 - Red Proctor, 54, pitcher who saw action in two games with the Chicago White Sox in 1923.
  • December 19 - Big Jeff Pfeffer, 72, National League pitcher for the Chicago Cubs and the Boston Beaneaters/Doves/Rustlers teams, who pitched his way into baseball history by throwing a no-hitter against the Cincinnati Reds on May 8, 1907.
  • December 31 - Tom Raftery, 73, outfielder who appeared in eight games for the Cleveland Naps in the 1909 season.

References

  1. ^ Roberto Clemente article. SABR Biography Project. Retrieved on March 3, 2018.
  2. ^ Bobby Thomson Fractures Ankle. Rare Newsapers website. Retrieved on March 14, 2018.
  3. ^ Newly acquired Bobby Thomson of the Braves breaks his ankle. Pinterest website. Retrieved on March 14, 2018.
  4. ^ All-American Girls Professional Baseball League Record Book W.C. Madden. McFarland, 2000. Softcover, 294pp. ISBN 978-0-7864-3747-4
  5. ^ Rabbit Maranville article. Baseball Hall of Fame website. Retrieved on February 28, 2018.
  6. ^ Bill Bradley article. SABR Biography Project. Retrieved on March 1, 2018.
  7. ^ Chief Bender article. Baseball Hall of Fame website. Retrieved on February 28, 2018.
  8. ^ Jim Bagby Sr. article. SABR Biography Project. Retrieved on March 1, 2018.
  9. ^ Art Hoelskoetter - Batting, pitching and fielding statistics. Retrosheet. Retrieved on March 2, 2018.
  10. ^ Oscar Charleston article. United States History website. Retrieved on March 2, 2018.
  11. ^ Boston Braves 1, Brooklyn Robins 1. Game Played on Saturday, May 1, 1920 (D) at Braves Field. Retrosheet box score. Retrieved on March 2, 2018.
  12. ^ Dave Davenport statistics and history. Baseball Reference. Retrieved on March 2, 2018.
  13. ^ Hugh Duffy article. SABR Biography Project. Retrieved on March 2, 2018.
  14. ^ Nick Maddox article. SABR Biography Project. Retrieved on March 2, 2018.
  15. ^ Great Baseball Feats, Facts and Figures, 2008 Edition, p.42, David Nemec and Scott Flatow, A Signet Book, Penguin Group, New York, ISBN 978-0-451-22363-0

  This article uses material from the Wikipedia page available here. It is released under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share-Alike License 3.0.

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