1999 IAAF World Indoor Championships
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1999 IAAF World Indoor Championships
7th IAAF World Indoor Championships
Maebashi 1999 logo.jpg
Host city Maebashi, Japan
Date(s) 5 March-7 March
Main stadium Green Dome Maebashi
Participation 451 athletes from
115 nations
Events 28
1997 Paris

The 7th IAAF World Indoor Championships in Athletics were held in the Green Dome Maebashi stadium in Maebashi, Japan from March 5 to March 7, 1999. It was the first time the Championships were staged outside Europe or North America. Primo Nebiolo, president of the IAAF, characterized the championships as "the greatest ever". There were a total number of 487 participating athletes from 115 countries.

Doping disqualifications

Four medalists were disqualified for doping; Rostislav Dimitrov of Bulgaria was stripped of the triple jump silver, Inger Miller of the USA was stripped of the 60 metre bronze, Vita Pavlysh of Ukraine was stripped of the shot put gold and Irina Korzhanenko of Russia was stripped of the shot put silver.[1]

Results

Men

Event Gold Silver Bronze
60 m
details
Maurice Greene
 United States
6.42
(CR)
Tim Harden
 United States
6.43
(PB)
Jason Gardener
 Great Britain
6.46
(AR)
200 m
details
Frankie Fredericks
 Namibia
20.10
(CR)
Obadele Thompson
 Barbados
20.26
(AR)
Kevin Little
 United States
20.48
400 m
details
Jamie Baulch
 Great Britain
45.73 Milton Campbell
 United States
45.99 Alejandro Cárdenas
 Mexico
46.02
(NR)
800 m
details
Johan Botha
 South Africa
1:45.47 Wilson Kipketer
 Denmark
1:45.49 Nico Motchebon
 Germany
1:45.74
1,500 m
details
Haile Gebrselassie
 Ethiopia
3:33.77
(CR)
Laban Rotich
 Kenya
3:33.98 Andrés Manuel Díaz
 Spain
3:34.46
3,000 m
details
Haile Gebrselassie
 Ethiopia
7:53.57 Paul Bitok
 Kenya
7:53.79 Million Wolde
 Ethiopia
7:53.85
60 m hurdles
details
Colin Jackson
 Great Britain
7.38
(CR)
Reggie Torian
 United States
7.40 Falk Balzer
 Germany
7.44
4 × 400 m relay
details
 United States (USA)
Andre Morris
Dameon Johnson
Deon Minor
Milton Campbell
3:02.83
(WR)
 Poland (POL)
Piotr Haczek
Jacek Bocian
Piotr Rysiukiewicz
Robert Ma?kowiak
3:03.01
(AR)
 Great Britain (GBR)
Allyn Condon
Solomon Wariso
Adrian Patrick
Jamie Baulch
3:03.20
(NR)
High jump
details
Javier Sotomayor
 Cuba
2.36 Vyacheslav Voronin
 Russia
2.36 Charles Austin
 United States
2.33
Pole vault
details
Jean Galfione
 France
6.00
(CR)
Jeff Hartwig
 United States
5.95
(AR)
Danny Ecker
 Germany
5.85
Long jump
details
Iván Pedroso
 Cuba
8.62
(CR)
Yago Lamela
 Spain
8.56
(AR)
Erick Walder
 United States
8.30
Triple jump
details *
Charles Friedek
 Germany
17.18
(PB)
LaMark Carter
 United States
16.98 Zsolt Czingler
 Hungary
16.98
Shot put
details
Aleksandr Bagach
 Ukraine
21.41 John Godina
 United States
21.06 Yuriy Bilonog
 Ukraine
20.89
Heptathlon
details
Sebastian Chmara
 Poland
6386
(WL)
Erki Nool
 Estonia
6374
(NR)
Roman ?ebrle
 Czech Republic
6319
(NR)
  • Rostislav Dimitrov of Bulgaria originally came second in the triple jump and was awarded the silver medal, but was later disqualified for doping.[1]

Women

Event Gold Silver Bronze
60 m
details *
Ekaterini Thanou
 Greece
6.96 Gail Devers
 United States
7.02 Philomena Mensah
 Canada
7.07
200 m
details
Ionela Târlea
 Romania
22.39 Svetlana Goncharenko
 Russia
22.69 Pauline Davis
 Bahamas
22.70
400 m
details
Grit Breuer
 Germany
50.80 Falilat Ogunkoya
 Nigeria
51.25 Jearl Miles Clark
 United States
51.45
800 m
details
Ludmila Formanová
 Czech Republic
1:56.90
(CR)
Maria Mutola
 Mozambique
1:57.17 Natalya Tsyganova
 Russia
1:57.47
(NR)
1,500 m
details
Gabriela Szabo
 Romania
4:03.23
(CR)
Violeta Beclea
 Romania
4:03.53
(PB)
Lidia Chojecka
 Poland
4:05.86
(NR)
3,000 m
details
Gabriela Szabo
 Romania
8:36.42 Zahra Ouaziz
 Morocco
8:38.43
(AR)
Regina Jacobs
 United States
8:39.14
(AR)
60 m hurdles
details
Olga Shishigina
 Kazakhstan
7.86 Glory Alozie
 Nigeria
7.87 Keturah Anderson
 Canada
7.90
4 × 400 m relay
details
 Russia (RUS)
Tatyana Chebykina
Svetlana Goncharenko
Olga Kotlyarova
Natalya Nazarova
3:24.25
(WR)
 Australia (AUS)
Susan Andrews
Tania Van Heer
Tamsyn Lewis
Cathy Freeman
3:26.87
(AR)
 United States (USA)
Monique Hennagan
Michelle Collins
Zundra Feagin
Shanelle Porter
3:27.59
(AR)
High jump
details
Khristina Kalcheva
 Bulgaria
1.99 Zuzana Hlavo?ová
 Czech Republic
1.96 Tisha Waller
 United States
1.96
Pole vault
details
Nastja Ryjikh
 Germany
4.50
(CR)
Vala Flosadóttir
 Iceland
4.45
(NR)
Nicole Rieger
 Germany
4.35
Zsuzsanna Szabó
 Hungary
Long jump
details
Tatyana Kotova
 Russia
6.86
(PB)
Shana Williams
 United States
6.82
(PB)
Iva Prandzheva
 Bulgaria
6.78
Triple jump
details
Ashia Hansen
 Great Britain
15.02
(WL)
Iva Prandzheva
 Bulgaria
14.94
(NR)
?árka Ka?párková
 Czech Republic
14.87
(NR)
Shot put
details *
Svetlana Krivelyova
 Russia
19.08 Krystyna Danilczyk
 Poland
19.00 Teri Steer
 United States
18.86
Pentathlon
details
Le Shundra Nathan
 United States
4753 Irina Belova
 Russia
4691 Urszula W?odarczyk
 Poland
4596

Medal table by country

Rank Nation Gold Silver Bronze Total
1  United States 3 8 8 19
2  Russia 3 3 1 7
3  Romania 3 1 0 4
4  Germany 3 0 4 6
5  Great Britain 3 0 2 5
6  Ethiopia 2 0 1 3
7  Cuba 2 0 0 2
8  Poland 1 2 2 5
9  Czech Republic 1 1 2 4
10  Bulgaria 1 1 1 3
11  Ukraine 1 0 1 2
12  France 1 0 0 1
12  Greece 1 0 0 1
12  Kazakhstan 1 0 0 1
12  Namibia 1 0 0 1
12  South Africa 1 0 0 1
17  Kenya 0 2 0 2
17  Nigeria 0 2 0 2
19  Spain 0 1 1 2
20  Australia 0 1 0 1
20  Barbados 0 1 0 1
20  Denmark 0 1 0 1
20  Estonia 0 1 0 1
20  Iceland 0 1 0 1
20  Morocco 0 1 0 1
20  Mozambique 0 1 0 1
27  Hungary 0 0 2 2
27  Canada 0 0 2 2
29  Bahamas 0 0 1 1
29  Mexico 0 0 1 1

Participating nations

See also

References

  1. ^ a b c d e Mark Butler (ed.), "DOPING VIOLATIONS AT IAAF WORLD INDOOR CHAMPIONSHIPS", IAAF Statistics Book - World Indoor Championships SOPOT 2014 (PDF), IAAF, pp. 47-48, retrieved 2015 
  2. ^ Morfey, Alex (2001-10-13). Athletics: Miller failed drug test in 1999. The Daily Telegraph. Retrieved on 2010-02-07.

External links



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