2006 Wimbledon Championships
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2006 Wimbledon Championships

2006 Wimbledon Championships
Date 26 June - 9 July
Edition 120th
Category Grand Slam (ITF)
Draw 128S / 64D / 48XD
Prize money £10,378,710
Surface Grass
Location Church Road
SW19, Wimbledon,
London, United Kingdom
Venue All England Lawn Tennis and Croquet Club
Champions
Men's Singles
Switzerland Roger Federer
Women's Singles
France Amélie Mauresmo
Men's Doubles
United States Bob Bryan / United States Mike Bryan
Women's Doubles
China Yan Zi / China Zheng Jie
Mixed Doubles
Israel Andy Ram / Russia Vera Zvonareva
Boys' Singles
Netherlands Thiemo de Bakker
Girls' Singles
Denmark Caroline Wozniacki
Boys' Doubles
United States Kellen Damico / United States Nathaniel Schnugg
Girls' Doubles
Gentlemen's Invitation Doubles
Australia Todd Woodbridge / Australia Mark Woodforde
Ladies' Invitation Doubles
United States Rosalyn Nideffer / Czech Republic Jana Novotná
Senior Gentlemen's Invitation Doubles
United States Kevin Curren / United States Johan Kriek
Wheelchair Men's Doubles
Japan Shingo Kunieda / Japan Satoshi Saida
← 2005 · Wimbledon Championships · 2007 →

The 2006 Wimbledon Championships was a tennis tournament played on grass courts at the All England Lawn Tennis and Croquet Club in Wimbledon, London in England.[1][2] It was the 120th edition of the Wimbledon Championships and were held from 26 June to 9 July 2006. It was the third Grand Slam tennis event of the year.

Roger Federer won his fourth consecutive Wimbledon title, defeating Rafael Nadal in what was to be the first of three consecutive Wimbledon finals played between the pair. Venus Williams was unsuccessful in her title defence, losing in the third round against Jelena Jankovi?. Amélie Mauresmo won her second Grand Slam title, and first and only Wimbledon title, defeating Justine Henin-Hardenne in the final in three sets. Mauresmo thus became the first Frenchwoman since 1925 to win the Wimbledon title.[3] It was Henin-Hardenne's second of three Grand Slam final defeats of 2006, having lost the 2006 Australian Open final to Mauresmo earlier in the year; on that occasion, Henin-Hardenne retired due to a stomach virus.

Notable stories

American performance and Serbian breakthrough

Jelena Jankovi? knocked Venus Williams out of Wimbledon in the third round.

For the first time since 1911, no American player reached the quarter-finals at Wimbledon, and for the first time since the 1976 Australian Open, no American player reached a Grand Slam quarter-final.[4]Shenay Perry was the only American player to reach the fourth round; she was defeated 6-2, 6-0 by Elena Dementieva after losing the last ten games of the match.[5] Her defeat also meant that no American woman reached the Wimbledon final for the first time since 1998.

Venus Williams' third round defeat by Jelena Jankovi? of Serbia (on its first Grand Slam appearance as a newly established independent nation from the former Serbia and Montenegro) caused the earliest exit by a defending women's champion at Wimbledon since Steffi Graf lost in the first round in 1994 and meant that neither of the Williams sisters (Serena Williams withdrew due to injury) would be represented in a Wimbledon final for the first time since 1999.[6] These championships were also the first to feature three Serbian players in the fourth round of any Grand Slam tournament: along with Jankovi?, Ana Ivanovic[7] and Novak Djokovic[8] also reached the fourth round, the former losing to Amélie Mauresmo and the latter losing to Mario An?i?.

Li Na's run to the quarter-finals

China's Li Na became the first player from her country to ever be seeded or reach the quarter-finals of a Grand Slam tournament. She upset the recent French Open finalist Svetlana Kuznetsova in the third round[9] and followed it up with a win over World No. 10 Nicole Vaidi?ová in the fourth round,[10] before losing her quarter-final to second seed Kim Clijsters.[11] Li would not reach another Grand Slam quarter-final until the 2009 US Open, where again she was defeated by Clijsters.[12]

Streaker incident

Midway during the ladies' quarter-final match between Maria Sharapova and Elena Dementieva, a streaker ran onto the Centre Court and interrupted the match, before ultimately being arrested and brought into custody by Wimbledon security guards.[13] The streaker was later revealed to be Dutch DJ Sander Lantinga, who carried out the stunt as part of the Dutch television show Try Before You Die.[14]

Prize money

The total prize money for 2006 championships was £10,378,710. The winner of the men's title earned £655,000 while the women's singles champion earned £625,000.[15][16]

Event W F SF QF Round of 16 Round of 32 Round of 64 Round of 128
Men's Singles £655,000
Women's Singles £625,000
Men's Doubles * £220,690 N/A
£205,280 N/A
Mixed Doubles * £90,000 N/A

* per team

Champions

Seniors

Men's Singles

Switzerland Roger Federer defeated Spain Rafael Nadal, 6-0, 7-6(7-5), 6-7(2-7), 6-3 [17]

Women's Singles

France Amélie Mauresmo defeated Belgium Justine Henin-Hardenne, 2-6, 6-3, 6-4 [18]

Men's Doubles

United States Bob Bryan / United States Mike Bryan defeated France Fabrice Santoro / Serbia Nenad Zimonji?, 6-3, 4-6, 6-4, 6-2 [19]

Women's Doubles

China Yan Zi / China Zheng Jie defeated Spain Virginia Ruano Pascual / Argentina Paola Suárez, 6-3, 3-6, 6-2 [20]

Mixed Doubles

Israel Andy Ram / Russia Vera Zvonareva defeated United States Venus Williams / United States Bob Bryan, 6-3, 6-2 [21]

Juniors

Boys' Singles

Netherlands Thiemo de Bakker defeated Poland Marcin Gawron, 6-2, 7-6(7-4)[22]

Girls' Singles

Denmark Caroline Wozniacki defeated Slovakia Magdaléna Rybáriková, 3-6, 6-1, 6-3 [23]

Boys' Doubles

United States Kellen Damico / United States Nathaniel Schnugg defeated Slovakia Martin Kli?an / Slovakia Andrej Martin, 7-6(9-7), 6-2 [24]

Girls' Doubles

Russia Alisa Kleybanova / Russia Anastasia Pavlyuchenkova defeated Ukraine Kristina Antoniychuk / Romania Alexandra Dulgheru, 6-1, 6-2 [25]

Other events

Gentlemen's Invitation Doubles

Australia Todd Woodbridge / Australia Mark Woodforde defeated United States T. J. Middleton / United States David Wheaton, 6-7(5-7), 7-5, 7-6(7-4)

Ladies' Invitation Doubles

United States Rosalyn Nideffer / Czech Republic Jana Novotná defeated United States Tracy Austin / France Nathalie Tauziat, 6-4, 6-3

Senior Gentlemen's Invitation Doubles

United States Kevin Curren / United States Johan Kriek defeated Australia Peter McNamara / Australia Paul McNamee, 7-5, 6-7(8-10), 7-6(11-9)

Wheelchair Men's Doubles

Japan Shingo Kunieda / Japan Satoshi Saida defeated France Michaël Jeremiasz / United Kingdom Jayant Mistry, 7-5, 6-2

Singles seeds

References

  1. ^ Collins, Bud (2010). The Bud Collins History of Tennis (2nd ed.). [New York]: New Chapter Press. ISBN 978-0942257700. 
  2. ^ Barrett, John (2014). Wimbledon: The Official History (4th ed.). Vision Sports Publishing. ISBN 9-781909-534230. 
  3. ^ Mauresmo takes Wimbledon title - ABC News (Australian Broadcasting Corporation)
  4. ^ Americans head home early, again - Tennis - ESPN
  5. ^ Perry, last American, loses; Sharapova, Li advance - Tennis - ESPN
  6. ^ Perry, not Venus, reaches second week - Tennis - ESPN
  7. ^ Lawn Tennis: Ana issues warning to Mauresmo; WIMBLEDON 2006. - Free Online Library
  8. ^ Tennis: Ancic power gives him hope of upsetting Federer's four-year-plan | Sport | The Guardian
  9. ^ Hingis, Kuznetsova lose in third-round matches - Tennis - ESPN
  10. ^ China's Na Li makes history - Tennis - ESPN
  11. ^ Belgians ready for third meeting of 2006 - Tennis - ESPN
  12. ^ US Open 2009: Kim Clijsters beats Li Na to reach semi-finals - Telegraph
  13. ^ Sharapova hides her blushes as streaker hits Centre Court | Mail Online
  14. ^ Wylie, Ian (5 July 2006). Streaker stops play on Centre Court, Salford Advertiser, Retrieved 15 November 2010
  15. ^ Little, Alan (2013). Wimbledon Compendium 2013 (23 ed.). London: All England Lawn Tennis & Croquet Club. p. 327-334. ISBN 978-1899039401. 
  16. ^ "About Wimbledon - Prize Money and Finance". wimbledon.com. Wimbledon Championships. Retrieved 2017. 
  17. ^ "Gentlemen's Singles Finals 1877-2017". wimbledon.com. Wimbledon Championships. Retrieved 2017. 
  18. ^ "Ladies' Singles Finals 1884-2017". wimbledon.com. Wimbledon Championships. Retrieved 2017. 
  19. ^ "Gentlemen's Doubles Finals 1884-2017". wimbledon.com. Wimbledon Championships. Retrieved 2017. 
  20. ^ "Ladies' Doubles Finals 1913-2017". wimbledon.com. Wimbledon Championships. Retrieved 2017. 
  21. ^ "Mixed Doubles Finals 1913-2017". wimbledon.com. Wimbledon Championships. Retrieved 2017. 
  22. ^ "Boys' Singles Finals 1947-2017". wimbledon.com. Wimbledon Championships. Retrieved 2017. 
  23. ^ "Girls' Singles Finals 1947-2017". wimbledon.com. Wimbledon Championships. Retrieved 2017. 
  24. ^ "Boys' Doubles Finals 1982-2017". wimbledon.com. Wimbledon Championships. Retrieved 2017. 
  25. ^ "Girls' Doubles Finals 1982-2017". wimbledon.com. Wimbledon Championships. Retrieved 2017. 

External links

Preceded by
2006 French Open
Grand Slams Succeeded by
2006 US Open

  This article uses material from the Wikipedia page available here. It is released under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share-Alike License 3.0.

2006_Wimbledon_Championships
 



 

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