28th Legislative District (New Jersey)
New Jersey's 28th Legislative District
New Jersey Legislative Districts Map (2011) D28 hl.svg
Senator Ronald Rice (D)
Assembly members Ralph R. Caputo (D)
Cleopatra Tucker (D)
Registration
Demographics
Population 210,635
Voting-age population 157,181
Registered voters 137,290

New Jersey's 28th Legislative District is one of 40 in the New Jersey Legislature. As of the 2011 apportionment, the district includes the Essex County municipalities of Bloomfield Township, Glen Ridge Borough, Irvington Township and Nutley Township, along with portions of Newark City (which is also part of the 29th District).[1][2]

Demographic characteristics

As of the 2010 United States Census, the district had a population of 210,635, of whom 157,181 (74.6%) were of voting age. The racial makeup of the district was 61,062 (29.0%) White, 113,140 (53.7%) African American, 912 (0.4%) Native American, 9,222 (4.4%) Asian, 116 (0.1%) Pacific Islander, 19,837 (9.4%) from some other race, and 6,346 (3.0%) from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 47,781 (22.7%) of the population.[3]The 28th District had 137,290 registered voters as of June 30, 2017, of whom 54,102 (39.4%) were registered as unaffiliated, 71,845 (52.3%) were registered as Democrats, 10,917 (8.0%) were registered as Republicans, and 426 (0.3%) were registered to other parties.[4]

Political representation

The district is represented for the 2016-2017 Legislative Session (Senate, General Assembly) in the State Senate by Ronald Rice (D, Newark) and in the General Assembly by Ralph R. Caputo (D, Nutley) and Cleopatra Tucker (D, Newark).[5][6]

Apportionment history

Since the creation of the 28th District in 1973 with the first drawing of the 40-district legislative map, the district has always included Irvington and a portion of western Newark. In the 1973 through 1981 version of the district, South Orange was also included in the district.[7] In the 1981 redistricting, it only consisted of Irvington and most of Newark's North Ward.[8] Following the 1991 redistricting, the 28th expanded to South Orange again and Maplewood for the first time.[9] In the 2001 redistricting, the district stretched from Irvington, to a narrow strip of Newark, and into Belleville and Bloomfield.[10] After the 2011 redistricting, Belleville moved to the 29th District while the 28th picked up Glen Ridge and Nutley.[1] As a result of this redistricting, long-time Belleville resident and incumbent Assemblyman Ralph R. Caputo moved to Nutley to run for re-election.[11]

Election history

In the 1970s, there was a high turnover rate among the district's legislators. The first pair of Assemblymen only served one term; Philip Keegan who would later become the head of the State Democratic Party retired in 1975 while the incumbent Rocco Neri was defeated by Peter Shapiro who was ultimately elected in the general election and became the state's youngest ever legislator at the age of 23.[12][13] The County Organization candidate that did win in 1975, Patrick Scanlon, died on June 11, 1977 and was replaced on the general election ballot by his wife, Mary.[12] In the November 1977 special election to complete the remainder of Scanlon's term, a Seton Hall graduate student named Joseph Papasidero won to serve for two months in the Assembly.[12] 1979 brought more changes to the district's delegation. Shapiro resigned in January to become Essex County's first Executive while Senator Martin L. Greenberg resigned in August for personal reasons. Newark Fire Chief John P. Caufield won the November 1979 special election for Greenberg's Senate seat while Remay Pearce won to serve for the remainder of Shapiro's Assembly term making her the first African American woman elected to the Assembly from the district.[14]

Through the 1980s, the district's delegation remained relatively stable with Michael Adubato, brother of Newark power broker Steve Adubato Sr., and James Zangari serving in the Assembly from the 28th throughout the entire decade. Caufield died of cancer on August 24, 1986 and was replaced in the Senate by Newark councilman Ronald Rice who still serves in the Senate from this district today.[15][16]

Major shifts would occur in the district's representatives in the 2000s decade. Donald Kofi Tucker died on October 17, 2005, weeks before the 2005 general election in which he was a candidate. Tucker won the election posthumously which meant the Essex County Democratic Committee members would choose a person to serve the remainder of Tucker's unexpired term and a temporary replacement for the 2006 session.[17] Former Newark School Board President Evelyn Williams was chosen in a vote over Essex County Freeholder and former Republican Assemblyman Ralph R. Caputo to serve in the unexpired term.[18] However, soon after she was sworn into the Assembly in December, Williams was arrested on shoplifting charges.[19] Williams would step down shortly before the end of the session of the legislature leaving one seat vacant again. Librarian and Newark South Ward Democratic activist Oadline Truitt was chosen by the committee to serve until a November 2006 special election that she also won.[19][20] Truitt and incumbent Assemblyman Craig A. Stanley were defeated in the 2007 Democratic primary by the Cory Booker-backed ticket of Caputo and Cleopatra Tucker, widow of Donald Tucker.[20][21]

The district, due to its urban core, leans very heavily to the Democratic Party having only elected Democrats to the state legislature. The 28th is one of the few districts statewide to have only elected members of one party to the legislature.[22] The closest races for the legislature in this district are as a result of independent politicians receiving a large share of the vote in some elections. For example, the lowest winning percentages for the Democratic candidates occurred in 1979 when Harry A. McEnroe and Zangari won 29.92% and 27.98% of the total vote respectively (57.9% total), while the two Republican candidates combined had 27.3% of the vote. Three independent candidates received 14.8% of the vote, 7.6% of which were for incumbent Assemblywoman Mary Scanlon who ran as an independent when she lost the party committee's backing in the primary election.[20][12]

Senators and Assembly members elected from the district are as follows:[20]

Session Senate Assembly
1974-1975 Martin L. Greenberg (D) Philip Keegan (D) Rocco Neri (D)
1976-1977 Patrick Scanlon (D)[n 1] Peter Shapiro (D)
Joseph Papasidero (D)[n 2]
1978-1979 Martin L. Greenberg (D)[n 3] Mary Scanlon (D) Peter Shapiro (D)[n 4]
John P. Caufield (D)[n 5] Remay Pearce (D)[n 6]
1980-1981 Harry A. McEnroe (D) James Zangari (D)
1982-1983 John P. Caufield (D) Michael Adubato (D) James Zangari (D)
1984-1985 John P. Caufield (D)[n 7] 
Michael Adubato (D) James Zangari (D)
1986-1987 Michael Adubato (D) James Zangari (D)
Ronald Rice (D)[n 8]
1988-1989 Ronald Rice (D) Michael Adubato (D) James Zangari (D)
1990-1991[23] Michael Adubato (D) James Zangari (D)
1992-1993 Ronald Rice (D) Harry A. McEnroe (D) James Zangari (D)
1994-1995[24] Ronald Rice (D) Harry A. McEnroe (D) James Zangari (D)
1996-1997 Craig A. Stanley (D) Wilfredo Caraballo (D)
1998-1999[25] Ronald Rice (D) Craig A. Stanley (D) Wilfredo Caraballo (D)
2000-2001[26] Craig A. Stanley (D) Wilfredo Caraballo (D)
2002-2003[27] Ronald Rice (D) Craig A. Stanley (D) Donald Kofi Tucker (D)
2004-2005[28] Ronald Rice (D) Craig A. Stanley (D) Donald Kofi Tucker (D)[n 9]
Evelyn Williams (D)[n 10]
2006-2007 Craig A. Stanley (D) Oadline Truitt (D)[n 11]
2008-2009 Ronald Rice (D) Ralph R. Caputo (D) Cleopatra Tucker (D)
2010-2011[31] Ralph R. Caputo (D) Cleopatra Tucker (D)
2012-2013 Ronald Rice (D) Ralph R. Caputo (D) Cleopatra Tucker (D)
2014-2015[32] Ronald Rice (D) Ralph R. Caputo (D) Cleopatra Tucker (D)
2016-2017 Ralph R. Caputo (D) Cleopatra Tucker (D)
  1. ^ Died June 11, 1977
  2. ^ Elected to the Assembly in November 1977 special election, sworn in on November 21, 1977
  3. ^ Resigned August 16, 1979
  4. ^ Resigned January 9, 1979 to become Essex County Executive
  5. ^ Elected to the Senate in November 1979 special election, sworn in on November 13, 1979
  6. ^ Elected to the Assembly in November 1979 special election, sworn in on November 19, 1979
  7. ^ Died August 24, 1986
  8. ^ Elected to the Senate on November 18, 1986 special election, sworn in on December 4, 1986
  9. ^ Died October 17, 2005
  10. ^ Appointed to the Assembly on December 12, 2005, resigned on January 9, 2006[29][30]
  11. ^ Appointed to the Assembly on February 9, 2006, elected to complete the term in November 2006 special election

Election results

Senate

New Jersey general election, 2017[33]
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Democratic Ronald L. Rice
Green Troy Knight-Napper N/A
Total votes
New Jersey general election, 2013[34]
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Democratic Ronald L. Rice 27,265 75.7 Decrease 0.9
Republican Frank Contella 8,744 24.3 Increase 0.9
Total votes 36,009 100.0
New Jersey general election, 2011[35]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Ronald L. Rice 14,781 76.6
Republican Russell Mollica 4,519 23.4
Total votes 19,300 100.0
New Jersey general election, 2007[36]
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Democratic Ronald L. Rice 12,821 77.0 Increase 3.6
Republican Herbert Glenn 3,838 23.0 Increase 0.1
Total votes 16,659 100.0
New Jersey general election, 2003[37]
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Democratic Ronald L. Rice 10,068 73.4 Increase 4.0
Republican Jean LaMothe 3,137 22.9 Decrease 6.7
Green Beresford Jones 518 3.8 N/A
Total votes 13,723 100.0
New Jersey general election, 2001[38]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Ronald L. Rice 27,294 69.4
Republican Marion Crecco 11,646 29.6
Independent Brian E. Coleman 403 1.0
Total votes 39,343 100.0
New Jersey general election, 1997[39]
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Democratic Ronald L. Rice 31,069 100.0 Steady
Total votes 31,069 100.0
New Jersey general election, 1993[40]
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Democratic Ronald L. Rice 25,107 100.0 Increase 32.8
Total votes 25,107 100.0
New Jersey general election, 1991[41]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Ronald L. Rice 15,456 67.2
Republican Brenda Jean-Pierre 6,876 29.9
Socialist Workers Rachel H. Knapik 666 2.9
Total votes 22,998 100.0
New Jersey general election, 1987[42]
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Democratic Ronald L. Rice 10,327 77.3 Increase 3.2
Republican Michael J. Volk 3,040 22.7 Increase 11.5
Total votes 13,367 100.0
Special election, November 18, 1986[43]
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Democratic Ronald L. Rice 4,772 74.1 Increase 1.2
For the People Anthony F. Montanelli 944 14.7 N/A
Republican Frederick Douglas Randolph, Jr. 724 11.2 Decrease 15.9
Total votes 6,440 100.0
New Jersey general election, 1983[44]
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Democratic John P. Caufield 11,829 72.9 Decrease 2.1
Republican Joseph N. Mastrangelo 4,392 27.1 Increase 2.1
Total votes 16,221 100.0
New Jersey general election, 1981[45]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic John P. Caufield 20,786 75.0
Republican Herta B. Tully 6,913 25.0
Total votes 27,699 100.0
Special election, November 6, 1979[46]
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Democratic John P. Caufield 10,974 57.6 Decrease 0.2
Republican Walter R. Cohn 4,759 25.0 Decrease 13.8
Uncommitted and Unbossed Michael P. Bottone 3,333 17.5 N/A
Total votes 19,066 100.0
New Jersey general election, 1977[47]
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Democratic Martin L. Greenberg 16,986 57.8 Decrease 2.5
Republican James A. Pindar 11,399 38.8 Increase 2.0
Income Tax Referendum Nicholas T. Fernicola 770 2.6 N/A
Jobs, Equality, Peace Charles E. Cascone 234 0.8 N/A
Total votes 29,389 100.0
New Jersey general election, 1973[48]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Martin L. Greenberg 22,290 60.3
Republican Joseph P. Galluzzi 13,601 36.8
American Chris Marciano 1,070 2.9
Total votes 36,961 100.0

Assembly

New Jersey general election, 2017[49]
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Democratic Ralph R. Caputo
Democratic Cleopatra G. Tucker
Republican James Boydston
Republican Veronica Branch
Time for Change Joanne Miller N/A
A New Hope Scott Thomas Nicastro Jr. N/A
Total votes
New Jersey general election, 2015[50]
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Democratic Ralph R. Caputo 9,512 43.2 Increase 4.3
Democratic Cleopatra G. Tucker 9,186 41.7 Increase 3.3
Republican David H. Pinckney 1,661 7.5 Decrease 4.2
Republican Darnel C. Henry 1,646 7.5 Decrease 3.6
Total votes 22,005 100.0
New Jersey general election, 2013[32]
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Democratic Ralph Caputo 26,221 38.9 Increase 1.3
Democratic Cleopatra G. Tucker 25,869 38.4 Increase 0.2
Republican Peter S. Manning 7,875 11.7 Decrease 0.9
Republican James Boydston 7,452 11.1 Decrease 0.5
Total votes 67,417 100.0
New Jersey general election, 2011[51]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Cleopatra G. Tucker 14,002 38.2
Democratic Ralph R. Caputo 13,786 37.6
Republican Carol Humphreys 4,607 12.6
Republican David H. Pinckney 4,258 11.6
Total votes 36,653 100.0
New Jersey general election, 2009[52]
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Democratic Cleopatra G. Tucker 25,975 40.8 Increase 3.2
Democratic Ralph R. Caputo 25,172 39.5 Increase 0.7
Republican Herbert Glenn 6,477 10.2 Decrease 2.1
Republican Andrew Bloschak 6,053 9.5 Decrease 1.8
Total votes 63,677 100.0
New Jersey general election, 2007[53]
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Democratic Ralph R. Caputo 12,264 38.8 Decrease 0.8
Democratic Cleopatra G. Tucker 11,891 37.6 Decrease 1.8
Republican Michael V. Lewis 3,898 12.3 Increase 2.1
Republican Andrew M. Bloschak 3,561 11.3 Increase 1.3
Total votes 31,614 100.0
Special election, November 7, 2006[54]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Oadline Truitt 25,265 93.9
One for All Joanne Maiorca 1,645 6.1
Total votes 26,910 100.0
New Jersey general election, 2005[55]
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Democratic Donald Tucker 27,030 39.6 Increase 2.2
Democratic Craig A. Stanley 26,890 39.4 Increase 3.2
Republican Ana Pizutelli 6,928 10.2 Decrease 2.8
Republican Barbara Dennis 6,820 10.0 Decrease 3.4
Socialist Workers Michael Ortega 513 0.8 N/A
Total votes 68,181 100.0
New Jersey general election, 2003[56]
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Democratic Donald Tucker 9,730 37.4 Increase 0.4
Democratic Craig A. Stanley 9,415 36.2 Decrease 0.4
Republican Barbara Dennis 3,480 13.4 Increase 0.7
Republican Nicholas F. DeAngelis 3,385 13.0 Increase 1.0
Total votes 26,010 100.0
New Jersey general election, 2001[57]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Donald Tucker 27,949 37.0
Democratic Craig A. Stanley 27,635 36.6
Republican Charles Daglian 9,557 12.7
Republican Michael Melham 9,042 12.0
Conservative Vincent J. Frantantoni 866 1.1
Independent William Coleman 474 0.6
Total votes 75,523 100.0
New Jersey general election, 1999[58]
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Democratic Craig A. Stanley 9,546 40.0 Increase 0.4
Democratic Wilfredo Caraballo 9,278 38.9 Decrease 1.2
Republican Hillary Dow 2,157 9.0 Decrease 1.9
Republican Steven Johnson 2,125 8.9 Increase 0.4
Pro Life Conservative Jim Riley 389 1.6 N/A
Pro Life Conservative Dick Hester 370 1.6 Increase 1.1
Total votes 23,865 100.0
New Jersey general election, 1997[59][25]
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Democratic Wilfredo Caraballo 28,673 40.1 Increase 5.0
Democratic Craig A. Stanley 28,261 39.6 Increase 5.5
Republican Mary Devon O'Brien 7,754 10.9 Decrease 1.1
Republican Eugene Brenycz 6,044 8.5 Decrease 3.6
Conservative Barbara M. Hester 368 0.5 Decrease 1.0
Conservative Richard S. Hester, Sr. 335 0.5 Decrease 0.7
(Decrease 1.3)
Total votes 71,435 100.0
New Jersey general election, 1995[60][61]
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Democratic Wilfredo Caraballo 10,939 35.1 Decrease 3.4
Democratic Craig A. Stanley 10,613 34.1 Decrease 1.4
Republican Eugene L. Brenycz 3,756 12.1 Steady
Republican Charles R. Olszewski 3,743 12.0 Decrease 1.9
Pro-Life Conservative Mary Ann E. Gaffney 688 2.2 N/A
Pro-Life Conservative Richard S. Hester, Sr. 553 1.8 N/A
Conservative Tammy Camastra 459 1.5 N/A
Conservative Christopher Camastra 377 1.2 N/A
Total votes 31,128 100.0
New Jersey general election, 1993[40]
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Democratic Harry McEnroe 23,128 38.5 Increase 5.2
Democratic James Zangari 21,357 35.5 Increase 3.1
Republican Phyllis C. Cedola 8,354 13.9 Decrease 1.6
Republican Eugene L. Brenycz 7,282 12.1 Decrease 3.4
Total votes 60,121 100.0
New Jersey general election, 1991[41]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Harry McEnroe 14,892 33.3
Democratic James Zangari 14,470 32.4
Republican Phyllis C. Cedola 6,933 15.5
Republican Consiglia Amato-DeMeo 6,903 15.5
Socialist Workers Al Duncan 762 1.7
Socialist Workers Marlene Karen Kopperud 694 1.6
Total votes 44,654 100.0
New Jersey general election, 1989[62]
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Democratic Michael F. Adubato 17,518 41.5 Increase 4.7
Democratic James Zangari 16,895 40.0 Increase 4.4
Republican Michael J. Grier 3,859 9.1 Decrease 1.6
Republican Michael Volk 3,699 8.8 Decrease 1.1
Socialist Workers Ernest M. Mailhot 281 0.7 N/A
Total votes 42,252 100.0
New Jersey general election, 1987[42]
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Democratic Michael F. Adubato 9,680 36.8 Increase 6.4
Democratic James Zangari 9,375 35.6 Increase 6.2
Republican Howard E. Berkeley 2,810 10.7 Decrease 10.2
Republican William P. Rutan 2,599 9.9 Decrease 9.3
People's Needs First Lawrence Hamm 1,850 7.0 N/A
Total votes 26,314 100.0
New Jersey general election, 1985[63]
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Democratic Michael F. Adubato 12,495 30.4 Decrease 4.1
Democratic James Zangari 12,092 29.4 Decrease 3.0
Republican Joe Imperiale 8,604 20.9 Increase 8.3
Republican Jose Linares 7,896 19.2 Increase 8.5
Total votes 41,087 100.0
New Jersey general election, 1983[44]
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Democratic Michael F. Adubato 10,816 34.5 Decrease 3.2
Democratic Jimmy Zangari 10,171 32.4 Decrease 3.6
Republican Anthony J. Carpiniello 3,948 12.6 Decrease 1.2
Republican Michael J. Volk 3,347 10.7 Decrease 1.9
Independent Frank G. Megaro 3,098 9.9 N/A
Total votes 31,380 100.0
New Jersey general election, 1981[45]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Michael F. Adubato 20,171 37.7
Democratic Jimmy Zangari 19,273 36.0
Republican Joseph N. Mastrangelo 7,379 13.8
Republican Alan D. Valdez 6,738 12.6
Total votes 53,561 100.0
New Jersey general election, 1979[46]
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Democratic Harry McEnroe 10,679 29.9 Decrease 5.7
Democratic James Zangari 9,989 28.0 Decrease 3.8
Republican William Conway 5,284 14.8 Decrease 1.3
Republican Marian E. Jackson 4,461 12.5 Decrease 3.0
My Experience Counts Mary M. Scanlon 2,705 7.6 Decrease 24.2
Strengthen Your Government Anthony De Franco 1,571 4.4 N/A
Law And Order Charles P. O'Boyle 1,006 2.8 N/A
Total votes 35,695 100.0
Special election, November 6, 1979[46]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Remay Pearce 9,684 60.6
Republican Joseph S. Soriano 6,303 39.4
Total votes 15,987 100.0
New Jersey general election, 1977[47]
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Democratic Peter Shapiro 20,659 35.6 Increase 1.3
Democratic Mary M. Scanlon 18,470 31.8 Increase 0.5
Republican William I. Conway 9,372 16.1 Decrease 0.7
Republican Oleh Myskiw 8,979 15.5 Increase 0.5
Independent Patrick Yorke 618 1.1 N/A
Total votes 58,098 100.0
Special election, November 8, 1977[47]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Joseph Papasidero 17,813 66.0
Republican Larry A. Raymond 9,193 34.0
Total votes 27,006 100.0
New Jersey general election, 1975[64]
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Democratic Peter Shapiro 19,257 34.3 Decrease 0.2
Democratic Patrick J. Scanlon 17,569 31.3 Decrease 2.5
Republican Paul R. Daniels 9,438 16.8 Increase 1.6
Republican Ruth L. Margules 8,408 15.0 Increase 1.5
Independents in Government Clementine H. Kasprowicz 628 1.1 N/A
Independents in Government George R. Schumarty 431 0.8 N/A
Libertarian William E. Schetlick 346 0.6 N/A
Total votes 56,077 100.0
New Jersey general election, 1973[48]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Philip M. Keegan 24,013 34.5
Democratic Rocco Neri 23,574 33.8
Republican Joseph T. DeVizio 10,566 15.2
Republican Charles C. Deubel, Jr. 9,436 13.5
American Melville T. Bowers 2,076 3.0
Total votes 69,665 100.0

References

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  3. ^ DP-1: Profile of General Population and Housing Characteristics: 2010 from the 2010 Demographic Profile Data for the General Assembly District 28 (2010), New Jersey, United States Census Bureau. Accessed February 24, 2014.
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28th_Legislative_District_(New_Jersey)



 

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