Australia Women's National Basketball Team
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Australia Women's National Basketball Team
 Australia
Opals logo.png
FIBA ranking 4 Decrease 2[1]
FIBA zone FIBA Oceania
National federation Basketball Australia
Coach Cheryl Chambers
Nickname(s) Opals
Olympic Games
Appearances 8
Medals Silver medal.svg Silver: (2000, 2004, 2008)
Bronze medal.svg Bronze: (1996, 2012)
Women's World Cup
Appearances 15
Medals Gold medal world centered-2.svg Gold: (2006)
Bronze medal world centered-2.svg Bronze: (1998, 2002, 2014)
Oceania Championship
Appearances 15
Medals Gold medal australia.svg Gold: (1974, 1978, 1982, 1985, 1989, 1995, 1997, 2001, 2003, 2005, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2013, 2015)
Asia Cup
Appearances 1
Medals SilverSilver: (2017)
Uniforms
Kit body lithuaniabasides2.png
Home jersey
Kit shorts.png
Team colours
Home
Kit body lithuaniabasides2.png
Away jersey
Kit shorts.png
Team colours
Away


The Australian women's national basketball team[2] is nicknamed the Opals, after the brightly coloured gemstone common to the country.[3] From 1994 onwards, the Opals have been consistently competitive and successful having won nine medals at official FIBA international tournaments (Olympics and World Cups), highlighted by a gold medal winning performance at the 2006 World Championship in Brazil.[4] At the regional Oceania Championship for Women, the Opals have won 15 titles.[5][6]

History

1950-60s: A new beginning

Basketball arrived in Melbourne in 1905, but the first major international women's tournament was the 1953 FIBA World Championships held in Chile.[7][8][9] Although the Opals did not qualify for the first tournament, they did, however, qualify for the 1957 Championships held in Brazil. Captained by Lorraine Eiler, the Opals defeated Cuba and Peru.[10] Sixteen year-old Bronte Cockburn led the scoring for Australia with an average of 9.5 points per game, but the inexperienced team ultimately finished in 10th place.[11] Since then, the Opals have helped increase the popularity of the sport in Australia.[12] Australia would not get the opportunity to participate at the 1959 World Championship held in Moscow because at the time, the Australian Government would not allow the team to travel to the USSR. The Opals would not qualify for a World Championship again until the 1967 contest in Czechoslovakia. With an entirely new team and a single victory over Italy, Australia finished in 10th position for the second time.[13] Team captain, Jean Forster, led the scoring for Australia with an average of 21.2 points per game, with a tournament high of 36 against Brazil.[14]

1970s: Early development

In 1971, the Opals travelled once again to Brazil. Led by new head coach Merv Harris, and featuring Jill Hammond, the team made several improvements with only three players from the 1967 squad selected.[12] Although the Opals finished in ninth place, they had victories over Madagascar (twice), Argentina, Ecuador and Canada.[15] In 1975, the team headed to Colombia with another new head coach, Jim Madigan. Despite a 74-25 confidence building win over Senegal, as well as victories over Japan, Brazil and Hungary, the team finished in 10th place.[16]

The 1976 Olympics held in Montreal marked the first Olympic medals awarded for women's basketball, but Opals did not qualify for the tournament.[17] Their next major competition would be the 1979 World Championships in South Korea, which would prove to be their first taste of success. The coach again was Jim Madigan, and the squad featured some of the faces of the Opals for the next decade such as Jenny Cheesman, Robyn Maher, Julie Nykiel, Karin Maar and Patricia Mickan.[12] The team would have early success defeating Italy and France, as well as thrashing Malaysia 119-14.[18] Australia would lose their next three games, but bounced back winning their final game over Japan to finish in fourth place, their best international result to that time.[19]

1980s: Into the Olympics

In the early days of women's Olympic basketball, only six countries competed in the tournament, and the host country received an automatic entry.[20] Therefore, there were 22 countries competing for the remaining five spots in 1980 Olympics held in Moscow. In the preliminary tournament, the Opals fell to the USA and Hungary, and did not qualify for the Olympics.[21] Three years later, the team traveled to Brazil for the 1983 World Championships, looking to demonstrate that their 1979 success was no accident. Despite an early victory over Japan, Australia failed to advance and finished in 11th place.[22] The Opals were not expected to participate at the 1984 Olympic Games held in Los Angeles. However, following the decision by Cuba to boycott the games, the door was opened for the Opals to compete in their first ever Olympics.[23] Led by head coach Brendan Flynn, and team captain Jenny Cheesman, the Opals played competitively in every game, but finished fifth out of the six teams.[24]

The next tournament for the Opals was the 1986 World Championships in Moscow. The first game against Hungary was a two overtime thriller that the Opals lost 79-77.[25] The game set the tone for the tournament, and despite some close finishes against the top rated teams, Australia finished in ninth place.[26] The Opals then headed into the 1988 Seoul Olympics with a medal hope, but they lost the first game to host nation Korea.[27] The Opals bounced back and defeated Bulgaria, meaning that only the powerful Soviet Union stood between them and a semi-finals berth. In a major upset, the Opals defeated the USSR 60-48, setting up a meeting against Yugoslavia. In a memorable game, the Opals lost a closely contested game at the buzzer 57-56, sending them to a rematch with the USSR for the bronze medal. Motivated by the previous loss, the USSR came out determined and outplayed the Opals 68-53.[28] Despite the loss, the fourth-place finish equalled the Opals' previous best international placing.[29]

1990s: Rise as an International force

Lauren Jackson in August 2012, Australia's most decorated basketball player

Building from their success at Seoul, the Opals headed to Malaysia for the 1990 World Championships with high hopes. The team won their first two games against Malaysia and Italy, before suffering a string of losses to Bulgaria, the Soviet Union, Yugoslavia and Czechoslovakia.[12] In their final game, the Opals came back from seven point halftime deficit to beat Bulgaria 73-71 and finish in sixth place.[30] Fifteen teams competed for the five open spots at the 1992 Barcelona Olympics, and despite a respectable 4-2 record at the preliminary tournament, the Opals did not qualify.[31]

Two years later, Australia played host to the 1994 FIBA World Championships.[32] Led by guard Shelley Sandie's 11.9 points per game, the team scored victories over Japan, Italy, Slovakia and Canada to set up a semi-finals match against China. The Opals held an early lead, but China mounted a second half comeback led by Haixia Zheng's 36 points, and Australia just lost by a single point 66-65.[33] In the bronze medal game, Australia played the United States, and despite a small halftime lead, the Opals lost a close game 100-95.[34] The loss however, resulted in a respectable fourth-place finish.[35] The young 1994 team featured the backbone of Australian teams over the next decade; Rachael Sporn, Trisha Fallon, Michelle Brogan, Allison Tranquilli, Sandy Brondello, Annie La Fleur and Jenny Whittle.[36]

At the 1996 Summer Olympics held in Atlanta, the Olympic tournament was expanded to twelve teams, making an easier path for Australia to qualify.[12] Captained by Robyn Maher, the Opals started off with strong wins over South Korea, Zaire, and Cuba before losing to eventual gold medalist USA and Ukraine. Australia then persevered through an overtime game against Russia to set up a semi-finals match against the United States. The US won the game 93-71, sending the Opals to a rematch against the Ukraine for the bronze medal. Australia held back a second half comeback by the Ukraine to win the game 66-56, earning Australia its first ever international basketball medal for either men or women.[37][38]

In 1998, the Opals looked to build off the bronze medal at the World Championships in Germany. The team featured 17-year-old future star Lauren Jackson, and was led by Michelle Brogan's average of 13.1 points per game.[39][40] Australia put together a dominant performance, winning their first seven games before losing to Russia 82-76 in a close semi-final match.[41] In the bronze medal game, Carla Boyd's 26 points proved too much for Brazil, and the Opals won 72-67 to earn their second bronze medal in international play.[42][43]

2000s: World Champions

With Sydney hosting the 2000 Olympic Games, the Opals gained automatic entry into the tournament.[44] Captained by Michele Timms, the team started out with dominating performances winning all of their first seven games, sending them to their first ever gold medal match, against the USA. The American team proved too strong for the Opals however, as they won 76-54.[45] Australia won the Silver Medal, their best result in international competition at the time.[46] In 2002, the Opals looked to continue their success in China at the World Championships. Coached by Jan Stirling, captained by Kristi Harrower, and powered by Lauren Jackson's 23.1 points per game (which led the tournament), Australia won its first five games all by double figures.[47] In the second round the Opals lost to Brazil, but bounced back with a 78-52 victory over France in the quarterfinal. In the semi-finals, the Opals lost to eventual gold medalist USA, but recovered the next day to capture the bronze medal with a convincing 91-63 win over South Korea.[48]

A photograph of the Australian National women's basketball team which won the 2006 FIBA World Championship for Women in basketball
The National team celebrating after being awarded the gold medals for winning the 2006 FIBA World Championship for Women in basketball

At the 2004 Olympics held in Athens, Greece, the Opals were led by Lauren Jackson's tournament best 22.9 points and 10 rebounds per game. With Penny Taylor contributing with 14.8 points per game, Australia dominated early winning their first seven games, all by double digits. The Opals set up a rematch of the 2000 Olympic gold medal match against the USA. The United States outlasted the Opals in the fourth quarter to win 74-63, giving the Opals their second straight Olympic silver medal.[49]

The Opals headed to Brazil for the 2006 World Championships looking to win their sixth straight medal in international competitions. Led by Lauren Jackson's 21.3 points per game and Penny Taylor's 18 points per game, first and third best in the tournament respectively, the Opals played their best tournament to date.[12] Australia began the tournament with a forfeit victory over Lithuania.[50] They continued the trend by winning their next seven games decisively, with only one contest being decided by less than 10 points. In the gold medal game against Russia, the Opals led throughout, paced by Penny Taylor's 28 points and Lauren Jackson's 11 rebounds. At the final buzzer, the scoreboard read Australia 91, Russia 74; a convincing victory that delivered Australia's first ever basketball gold medal.[4][51] Penny Taylor was named the Most Valuable Player of the tournament.[32]

At the 2008 Beijing Olympics, the Opals looked to reaffirm their title as World Champions. In the lead up, Australia went underfeated against Belarus, Brazil, South Korea, Latvia, Russia, Czech Republic and host China to set up a third straight gold medal match against the United States.[52] The Opals had trouble hitting the basket and shot just 24% en route to a 92-65 defeat.[53] The team earned their third straight Olympic silver medal, and their seventh straight international medal finish.[54] The 2000s was a golden era for the Opals, winning at least a bronze medal at every official FIBA tournament.

2010s: Ushering a new era

In 2010, the 16th edition of the World Championship was held in the Czech Republic. Pre-tournament favourites Australia, USA, and Russia, dominated play in the first two rounds. In the quarterfinals, however, Australia suffered a shock 79-68 loss to the Czech Republic.[55] The loss meant that the Opals could not finish any higher than 5th place, its worst international result since the early 1990s.[56]

Liz Cambage, the first woman in Olympic history to slam dunk a basketball

Looking to rebound from their disappointing 2010 result, the Opals qualified for the 2012 Olympic Games in London by beating New Zealand three games to nil in the 2011 FIBA Oceania Championship.[57][58] They finished the Olympic preliminary series with a 4 - 1 record, losing to France in game 2, but after Belinda Snell sank a well beyond the half-court line 3 point shot with less than one second on the clock to send the game into overtime.[59][60] Against Russia, Liz Cambage became the first woman in Olympic history to successfully slam dunk a basketball.[61][62] In the quarterfinal against China, Lauren Jackson became the Olympic Games record holder for points scored, overtaking Brazilian legend Janeth Arcain's tally of 535 points.[63] The Opals accounted for China 75-60 to set up a semifinal game with their long-time rivals USA.[64] Despite holding a half-time lead, the Opals again fell short losing 86-73.[65] The Opals would however, win their 5th consecutive Olympic medal with an 83-74 win over Russia to claim the bronze.[66]

Leading up to the 2014 World Championship in Turkey, a number of long-serving players announced their retirements or declared themselves unavailable. Those players included Kristi Harrower, Jenni Screen, Kristen Veal, Abby Bishop, Kathleen MacLeod, Samantha Richards, Suzy Batkovic and Jenna O'Hea.[67][68][69][70][71][72] Three weeks before the start of the tournament, Lauren Jackson withdrew from the team because of a knee injury.[73] Two weeks later Liz Cambage ruptured her achilles tendon during a pre-tournament game and was ruled-out because of the injury.[74] This resulted in the selection of seven debutants into the squad of 12, a move seen as ushering in a new era of Opals basketball.[75] Despite the loss of veteran players, the Opals went through the preliminary rounds and quarter-final undefeated, setting up a semi-final clash with USA. In a hard-fought game, the Opals cut the lead from 16 points to just six early in the final quarter, before losing 82-70. The Opals would however claim their third bronze medal at world championships with a comfortable 74-44 win against host nation Turkey.[76]Penny Taylor was named to the tournament All-Star Five.[77]

The Opals qualified for the 2016 Olympics in Rio de Janeiro following a series win against New Zealand in August 2015.[78] On 31 March 2016, Lauren Jackson announced her retirement from basketball, citing a chronic knee injury as the reason for her decision.[79] The Olympic squad was announced on 12 July 2016 and included seven Olympic debutants and only three players from the 2012 squad.[80] Notable exclusions included three-time Olympic medallist Suzy Batkovic, reigning WNBL MVP Abby Bishop and Rebecca Allen.[81] Despite slow starts which had plagued Australia throughout the tournament, the Opals finished on top of their group with a 5-0 record, outscoring Japan 33-15 in the final quarter to win by 6 points. In the Quarter-final, the Opals suffered a shock 73-71 loss to Serbia, conceding 26 turnovers and eliminating them from medal contention.[82] This ended a run of five successive Olympic medals dating back 20 years.[83] One highlight was Liz Cambage breaking Lauren Jackson's Australian Olympic record of points scored in a single game with 37 against Japan.[84] It was the third-highest haul by a woman in Olympic history and the highest in 28 years.[85]

Following the early exit from the Rio Olympics, Brendan Joyce was replaced by former Opals player and Phoenix Mercury head coach, Sandy Brondello, in April 2017.[86] Unlike previous years, the Opals qualified for the 2018 World Cup through the FIBA Women's Asia Cup held in India where they won a silver medal.[87][88]Kelsey Griffin was named tournament most valuable player.[89]

Tournament record

World Cup

The first official Women's World Cup, known as the Women's World Championship through its 2014 edition, was held in Chile in 1953.[8] The tournament was expanded to 16 countries (teams) in 1990. Since 2017, Australia qualifies for the World Cup through competing in the FIBA Women's Asia Cup, held each four years in the year preceding the Women's World Cup. Before then, Australia qualified through the FIBA Oceania Championship.[32] Typically, this tournament featured either a two or three-game series between Australia and New Zealand.[6][90] FIBA discontinued the Oceania championships for both women and men after their respective 2015 editions, combining FIBA Asia and FIBA Oceania into a single zone for purposes of World Cup and Olympic qualification.

Olympic Games

Women's basketball was introduced as an Olympic sport at Montreal in 1976.[91] From 1976 to 1992, only six countries (teams) participated in the Olympic tournament. However, in 1996 at Atlanta the tournament was expanded to twelve teams.[92] Australia qualifies for the Olympic Games through competing in the FIBA Oceania Basketball Championship held each four years in the year preceding the games.[32] Typically, this tournament featured either a two or three-game series between Australia and New Zealand.[6][93]

Asia Cup

Commencing in 2017, teams from Oceania and Asia zones competed together for the first time ever with the top four finishing teams qualifying for the 2018 World Cup.

Statistics

Australia statistical leaders
Event PPG RPG APG SPG BPG
Brazil 1957 B. Cockburn (9.5) - - - -
Czechoslovakia 1967 J. Forster (21.2) - - - -
Brazil 1971 R. Hannett (8.6) - - - -
Colombia 1975 M. Jackson (13.3) - - - -
South Korea 1979 M. Jackson (17.7) - - - -
Brazil 1983 R. Maher (11.6) - - - -
United States 1984 J. Nykiel (11.6) - - - -
Soviet Union 1986 K. Foster (10.3) - - - -
South Korea 1988 R. Maher (15.4) - - - -
Malaysia 1990 M. Timms (12.6) - - - -
Australia 1994 S. Sandie (11.9) R. Sporn (4.6) R. Maher (3.6) R. Maher (2.3) -
United States 1996 M. Timms (15.0) R. Sporn (7.4) M. Timms (3.5) M. Timms (2.1) -
Germany 1998 M. Brogan (13.1) M. Brogan (5.7) M. Timms (4.0) K. Harrower (1.7) -
Australia 2000 L. Jackson (15.9) L. Jackson (8.4) K. Harrower (3.8) C. Boyd (1.5) L. Jackson (2.3)
China 2002 L. Jackson (23.1) M. Brogan (5.6) K. Harrower (3.1) P. Taylor (2.4) L. Jackson (0.5)
Greece 2004 L. Jackson (22.9) L. Jackson (10.0) K. Harrower (2.8) P. Taylor (1.6) L. Jackson (1.6)
Brazil 2006 L. Jackson (21.3) L. Jackson (8.9) K. Harrower (3.9) P. Taylor (1.6) L. Jackson (1.3)
China 2008 L. Jackson (17.3) S. Batkovic (8.9) K. Harrower (4.4) P. Taylor (2.1) L. Jackson (0.7)
Czech Republic 2010 E. Cambage (13.6) L. Jackson (7.9) K. Harrower (2.6) K. Harrower (1.6) E. Cambage (1.0)
United Kingdom 2012 L. Jackson (15.9) L. Jackson (7.9) J. O'Hea (3.5) S. Batkovic (1.2) E. Cambage (1.6)
Turkey 2014 M. Tolo (12.2) M. Tolo (5.2) P. Taylor (4.8) E. Phillips (1.6) C. George (1.0)
Brazil 2016 E. Cambage (23.5) E. Cambage (10.3) P. Taylor (5.5) P. Taylor (2.0) M. Tolo (1.0)

Team

Current squad

Roster for the 2017 FIBA Women's Asia Cup.[94]

Past World Cup squads

Past Olympics squads

International caps

The following is a chronological list of Australian players who have played at official senior FIBA international tournaments (Olympic Games and World Cups). The list includes both past and present players. Active players are shown in bold. Where two or more players debuted in the same series, their cap number is determined by their official uniform number (and not alphabetically). As at October 2017, 106 players had represented Australia at Olympic Games and World Cups. There were no debutants at the 2000 Olympic Games in Sydney.

+ Deceased

Individual achievements

Opals all-time games played

Legend

  • Games played is current as at the completion of the London Olympic Games in August 2012.
  • (*) denotes the player is a member of the Australian Basketball Hall of Fame.
  • Italic denotes the player is still active.

Opals Team Captains

Legend

  • Tournaments are those officially sanctioned by FIBA.

See also

References

  1. ^ FIBA (2008). FIBA World ranking for women. Retrieved on 26 August 2008.
  2. ^ FIBA. Profile Australia (AUS). Retrieved 16 August 2012.
  3. ^ Greenwood. W.A. (2007, p.44). Australian identity - A sense of belonging. Published by R.I.C. Publications, Australia. OCLC 277177825. ISBN 9781741266726.
  4. ^ a b FIBA Archive. 2006 World Championship: Tournament for Women. Event Standings. Retrieved 2012-08-12.
  5. ^ The Landon Trophy for competition between Australian and New Zealand Archived 20 May 2013 at the Wayback Machine.. FIBA Oceania. Retrieved 2012-09-07.
  6. ^ a b c FIBA Archive. 2011 FIBA Oceania Championship for Women. History. Retrieved 7 September 2012.
  7. ^ Nauright, John & Parrish, Charles (2012, p. 361). Sports Around the World: History, Culture, and Practice. Published by Santa Barbara, California. OCLC 729344518. ISBN 9781598843002.
  8. ^ a b USA Basketball. First World Championship for Women - 1953. Retrieved 2012-08-21.
  9. ^ FIBA Archive. 1953 World Championship for Women. Event Standings. Retrieved 14 August 2012.
  10. ^ Lorraine Eiler. Basketball Australia: Hall of Fame. Retrieved 14 August 2012.
  11. ^ FIBA Archive. 1957 World Championship for Women. Event Standings. Retrieved 2012-08-14.
  12. ^ a b c d e f Basketball Australia. Opals History. Retrieved 28 July 2012.
  13. ^ FIBA Archive. 1967 World Championship for Women. Event Standings. Retrieved 14 August 2012.
  14. ^ FIBA Archive. 1967 World Championship for Women. Statistics. Retrieved 2017-11-16.
  15. ^ FIBA Archive. 1971 World Championship for Women. Event Standings. Retrieved 14 August 2012.
  16. ^ FIBA Archive. 1975 World Championship for Women. Event Standings. Retrieved 14 August 2012.
  17. ^ FIBA Archive. 1976 Olympic Games: Tournament for Women. Event Standings. Retrieved 2012-08-13.
  18. ^ FIBA Archive. 1979 World Championship for Women. Box Score: Malaysia v Australia. Retrieved 14 August 2012.
  19. ^ FIBA Archive. 1979 World Championship: Tournament for Women. Event Standings. Retrieved 2012-08-13.
  20. ^ Olympic basketball qualification. NBC Universal: London 2012 Basketball. Retrieved 16 August 2012.
  21. ^ FIBA Archive. 1980 Olympic Games: Tournament for Women. Event Standings. Retrieved 2012-08-13.
  22. ^ FIBA Archive. 1983 World Championship: Tournament for Women. Event Standings. Retrieved 2012-08-13.
  23. ^ Williamson, Andrea (25 July 2008). SA Olympians Past and Present - Pat Mickan. ABC Adelaide. Retrieved 16 August 2012.
  24. ^ FIBA Archive. 1984 Olympic Games: Tournament for Women. Event Standings. Retrieved 2012-07-22.
  25. ^ FIBA Archive. 1986 World Championship for Women. Box Score: Australia v Hungary. Retrieved 16 August 2012.
  26. ^ FIBA Archive. 1986 World Championship: Tournament for Women. Event Standings. Retrieved 2012-08-13.
  27. ^ FIBA Archive. 1988 Olympic Games: Tournament for Women. Box Score: Australia v Korea. Retrieved 14 August 2012.
  28. ^ FIBA Archive. 1988 Olympic Games: Tournament for Women. Box Score: Australia v Soviet Union. Retrieved 16 August 2012.
  29. ^ FIBA Archive. 1988 Olympic Games: Tournament for Women. Event Standings. Retrieved 2012-07-22.
  30. ^ FIBA Archive. 1990 World Championship: Tournament for Women. Event Standings. Retrieved 2012-08-13.
  31. ^ FIBA Archive. 1992 Olympic Games: Tournament for Women. Event Standings. Retrieved 2012-08-13.
  32. ^ a b c d FIBA Women's World Championships. Basketball Australia: WNBL. Retrieved 18 August 2012.
  33. ^ FIBA Archive. 1994 World Championship for Women. Box Score: Australia v China. Retrieved 14 August 2012.
  34. ^ FIBA Archive. 1994 World Championship for Women. Box Score: USA v Australia. Retrieved 2012-08-14.
  35. ^ FIBA Archive. 1994 World Championship: Tournament for Women. Event Standings. Retrieved 2012-08-13.
  36. ^ FIBA Archive. 1994 World Championship for Women. Australia. Retrieved 13 January 2013.
  37. ^ FIBA Archive. 1996 Olympic Games: Tournament for Women. Event Standings. Retrieved 2012-07-22.
  38. ^ FIBA Archive. 1996 Olympic Games: Tournament for Women. Box Score: Ukraine v Australia. Retrieved 17 August 2012.
  39. ^ WNBA star Lauren Jackson to carry Australian flag at opening ceremony. Mercury News Media Center (26 July 2012). Retrieved 18 August 2012.
  40. ^ FIBA Archive. 1998 World Championship for Women. Player Profile: Michelle Brogan. Retrieved 2012-08-18.
  41. ^ FIBA Archive. 1998 World Championship for Women. Box Score: Russia v Australia. Retrieved 2012-08-18.
  42. ^ FIBA Archive. 1998 World Championship: Tournament for Women. Event Standings. Retrieved 2012-08-12.
  43. ^ FIBA Archive. 1998 World Championship for Women. Player Profile: Carla Boyd. Retrieved 18 August 2012.
  44. ^ The Landon Trophy for competition between Australian and New Zealand (page 7) Archived 20 May 2013 at the Wayback Machine.. FIBA Oceanic History. Retrieved 2012-11-03.
  45. ^ FIBA Archive. 2000 Olympic Games: Tournament for Women. Box Score: USA v Australia. Retrieved 2012-08-18.
  46. ^ FIBA Archive. 2000 Olympic Games: Tournament for Women. Event Standings. Retrieved 2012-07-22.
  47. ^ FIBA Archive. 2002 World Championship for Women. Player Leaders. Retrieved 2016-02-03.
  48. ^ FIBA Archive. 2002 World Championship: Tournament for Women. Event Standings. Retrieved 2012-08-12.
  49. ^ FIBA Archive. 2004 Olympic Games: Tournament for Women. Event Standings. Retrieved 2012-08-13.
  50. ^ Dampney, James (14 September 2006). Lithuania forfeit a letdown for Opals. The Age. Retrieved 2012-07-28.
  51. ^ Opals savour golden moment in history (25 September 2006). The Sydney Morning Herald. Retrieved 2012-07-28.
  52. ^ Murphy, Mitchell (24 August 2008). Opals settle for silver. The Sydney Morning Herald. Retrieved 2012-08-14.
  53. ^ Das, Andrew (23 August 2008). FINAL U.S. Defeats Australia, 92-65, for Gold Medal in Women's Basketball. The New York Times. Retrieved 2012-07-28.
  54. ^ FIBA Archive. 2008 Olympic Games: Tournament for Women. Event Standings. Retrieved 2012-08-13.
  55. ^ Czech hosts shock Australia as Russia lose to Belarus. BBC Sport: Basketball. Retrieved 2012-07-28.
  56. ^ FIBA Archive. 2010 World Championship: Tournament for Women. Event Standings. Retrieved 2012-08-13.
  57. ^ Opals ready to turn to gold. Australian Olympic Team (22 June 2012). Retrieved 2012-08-12.
  58. ^ The Landon Trophy for competition between Australian and New Zealand (page 11) Archived 20 May 2013 at the Wayback Machine.. FIBA Oceanic History. Retrieved 2013-01-07.
  59. ^ Lewis, Ross (31 July 2012). Greatest shot in Olympic women's basketball? The West Australian. Retrieved 2012-08-14.
  60. ^ Dutton, Chris (21 July 2012). 'Hail Mary' heroine's rollercoaster ride as overtime god forsakes Opals. Brisbane Time. Retrieved 2012-08-12.
  61. ^ Kent, Paul (4 August 2012). Opals on a roll, fend off Russians 70-66. Herald Sun. Retrieved 2012-08-12.
  62. ^ Dutton, Chris (3 August 2012). Slambage signals her arrival as Opals dispose of Russia. The Sydney Morning Herald. Retrieved 2012-08-12.
  63. ^ Lauren Jackson breaks Olympic scoring record. Basketball Australia (8 August 2012). Retrieved 2016-02-18.
  64. ^ Hand, Guy (8 August 2012). Opals face US nemesis a match early. Ninemsn Sport. Retrieved 2012-08-12.
  65. ^ Opals beaten by USA in women's basketball semi-final. Herald Sun (10 August 2012). Retrieved 2012-08-12.
  66. ^ Dutton, Chris (12 August 2012). Opals stand tall after gutsy bronze. Brisbane Times. Retrieved 2012-08-12.
  67. ^ Ward, Roy (9 March 2014). Home win might be the end for basketballer Kristi Harrower. The Age. Retrieved 2014-08-03.
  68. ^ Ward, Roy (29 July 2014). Australian veteran Jenni Screen retires from Opals. The Sydney Morning Herald. Retrieved 2014-08-03.
  69. ^ Tuxworth, Jon (7 May 2014). Lauren Jackson, Kristen Veal could reunite at Canberra Capitals. The Canberra Times. Retrieved 2014-08-03.
  70. ^ Dutton, Chris (8 April 2014). Parenting rules force Abby Bishop to miss basketball world championships. The Sydney Morning Herald. Retrieved 2014-08-03.
  71. ^ Ward, Roy (6 October 2013). Keeping it in the family. The Sydney Morning Herald. Retrieved 2014-08-03.
  72. ^ Basketball Australia (20 March 2014). Batkovic and O'Hea withdraw from Opals 2014 campaign. Retrieved 2014-008-03
  73. ^ Lauren Jackson pulls out of basketball worlds due to knee injury (1 September 2014). Fox News. Retrieved 2014-09-02.
  74. ^ Opals not fazed by loss of Lauren Jackson and Liz Cambage (26 September 2014). The Sydney Morning Herald. Retrieved 2014-10-06.
  75. ^ Basketball Australia (10 September 2014). Jayco Opals Team Named for FIBA World Championship for Women. Retrieved 2014-09-11.
  76. ^ Opals overrun Turkey to take third place (5 October 2014) FIBA.com Retrieved 2014-10-06.
  77. ^ Basketball Australia (6 October 2014). Jayco Opals captain Penny Taylor named in All-Star Five. Retrieved 2014-10-06.
  78. ^ Ward, Roy (August 17, 2015). Australian Opals make the Rio Olympics with series win over New Zealand. The Sydney Morning Herald. Retrieved 2015-08-29.
  79. ^ Tuxworth, Jon (March 31, 2016). Australian basketball champion Lauren Jackson retires as game's greatest. The Sydney Morning Herald. Retrieved 2016-03-31.
  80. ^ Rio 2016: Suzy Batkovic left out of Opals' Olympic team (July 12, 2016). ABC News. Retrieved 2016-07-13.
  81. ^ Rio Olympics 2016: Suzy Batkovic cut from Opals Games team (July 12, 2016). The Sydney Morning Herald. Retrieved 2016-07-13.
  82. ^ Devastating End to Australian Women's RIO 2016 Campaign. Basketball Australia. Retrieved 2016-08-17.
  83. ^ Turnovers haunt Opals as Serbia knocks Australia out of Olympic tournament. Australian Broadcasting Corporation. Retrieved 2016-08-17.
  84. ^ http://www.basketball.net.au/future-bright-for-australian-basketball-after-rio-2016-campaign/ Future Bright for Australian Basketball after 2016 Rio Campaign. Basketball Australia. Retrieved 2016-08-29.
  85. ^ Adaimy, Roje (August 12, 2016). Liz Cambage leads Opals to win over Japan in Rio Olympics basketball. The Sydney Morning Herald. Retrieved 2016-08-29.
  86. ^ Ward, Roy (April 18, 2017). Sandy Brondello named Australian Opals coach on road to 2020 Tokyo Olympics. The Sydney Morning Herald. Retrieved 2017-04-30.
  87. ^ "FIBA Women's Basketball World Cup 2018". fiba.com. 
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External links


  This article uses material from the Wikipedia page available here. It is released under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share-Alike License 3.0.


Australia_women's_national_basketball_team
 



 

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