Baltimore Public Markets

The city of Baltimore currently has five public markets across the city. The Baltimore Public Market System is the oldest continuously operating public market system in the United States.[1] Today, the markets are administered by the Baltimore Public Market Corporation, which was established in 1995 as a non-profit organization.[2]

History

In 1751, twenty years after the founding of Baltimore Town, the first public market house was introduced.[3]Twelve years later, the first market was constructed. At the peak of their operation, there were eleven markets across the city.[4] Responsibility for the markets interchanged to the Baltimore Comptroller's Office in 1857, and then transferred again to the Mayor's Office in 1983.[5]

Current Markets

Name Built Address Coordinates Notes
Avenue Market 1871 1700 Pennsylvania Avenue,
Baltimore, Maryland 21217
39°18?13?N 76°38?09?W / 39.3037°N 76.6357°W / 39.3037; -76.6357 (Avenue Market) Serves the Upton neighborhood. Originally named Lafayette Market until it was changed in 1996, following an extensive renovation.[6]
Broadway Market Fells Point-6.jpg 1786 1640-41 Aliceanna Street,
Baltimore, Maryland 21231
39°17?03?N 76°35?36?W / 39.2842°N 76.5934°W / 39.2842; -76.5934 (Broadway Market) One of the first three markets to serve the city. Originally named Fells Point Market but was then relocated to the center of Broadway.[7]
Cross Street Market Cross Street Market (5136597091).jpg 1846 1065 S. Charles Street,
Baltimore, Maryland 21230
39°16?36?N 76°36?48?W / 39.2768°N 76.6133°W / 39.2768; -76.6133 (Cross Street Market) Serves the Federal Hill-SoBo neighborhoods of Baltimore. In 2015, it was announced that the market would be renovated.[8]
Hollins Market Hollins Market.jpg 1838 26 S. Arlington Avenue,
Baltimore, Maryland 21223
39°17?15?N 76°38?10?W / 39.2875°N 76.6360°W / 39.2875; -76.6360 (Hollins Market) Named after the Hollins family of Union Square, who owned the land surrounding the market.[9]
Lexington Market Lexington Market Baltimore LOC 4a10972u.jpg 1782 400 W. Lexington Street,
Baltimore, MD 21201
39°17?29?N 76°37?18?W / 39.2915°N 76.6218°W / 39.2915; -76.6218 (Lexington Market) Built on land provided by John Eager Howard,[10] this is one of the longest-running public markets in the world. The market also features notable Baltimore foods, such as Berger Cookies and Faidley's Crabcakes.
Northeast Market 1885 2101 E. Monument Street,
Baltimore, Maryland 21205
39°17?53?N 76°35?15?W / 39.2981°N 76.5876°W / 39.2981; -76.5876 (Northeast Market) Was constructed nearly 100 years after Broadway Market, during the time of the construction of Johns Hopkins Hospital.[11]

Defunct Markets

Name Built Address Coordinates Notes
Centre Market
Fish Market
1787 35 Market Place,
Baltimore, MD 21202
39°17?20?N 76°36?23?W / 39.2890°N 76.6063°W / 39.2890; -76.6063 (Centre Market) Originally the market for Baltimore's seafood industry, the structure was renovated and repurposed as Port Discovery Children's Museum in 1998.[12]
Belair Market 1871 Forrest and Orleans Streets, Baltimore, MD 21202 39°17?43?N 76°36?16?W / 39.2952°N 76.6044°W / 39.2952; -76.6044 (Belair Market) The site of the market is now part of the Old Town Mall development in East Baltimore.
North Avenue Market 1928 14-34 West North Avenue,
Baltimore, MD 21201
39°18?41?N 76°37?03?W / 39.3114°N 76.6174°W / 39.3114; -76.6174 (North Avenue Market) The private market included 12 stores and a bowling alley.[13] Since its closing in the 1960s, the structure has been converted for retail and entertainment for Station North Arts and Entertainment District.
Richmond Market 1853 301 West Read Street,
Baltimore, MD 21201
39°18?03?N 76°37?14?W / 39.3007°N 76.6205°W / 39.3007; -76.6205 (Richmond Market) The original structure is now part of the University of Maryland Medical Center Midtown Campus.
Waverly Market 1920 33rd Street and Greenmount Avenue,
Baltimore, MD 21218
39°19?41?N 76°36?35?W / 39.3281°N 76.6098°W / 39.3281; -76.6098 (Waverly Market) Another private market, Waverly Market included a variety of shopping options for North Baltimore residents.[14]

References


  This article uses material from the Wikipedia page available here. It is released under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share-Alike License 3.0.


Baltimore_Public_Markets



 

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