Band-Aid
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Band-Aid
Band-Aid
Band-Aid brand logo.
A Band-Aid brand bandage
Product type Adhesive bandage/dressing
Owner Johnson & Johnson
Country U.S.
Introduced June 1920 (invention)
Markets Worldwide
Tagline "I am stuck on Band-Aid (brand) 'cause Band-Aid's stuck on me!"
Website www.band-aid.com
Microscopic image of a bloodied Band-Aid

Band-Aid is a brand name of American pharmaceutical and medical devices giant Johnson & Johnson's line of adhesive bandages.

History

The Band-Aid was invented in 1920 by Thomas Anderson and Johnson & Johnson employee Earle Dickson in Escondido, California for his wife Josephine, who frequently cut and burned herself while cooking.[1] The prototype allowed her to dress her wounds without assistance. Dickson passed the idea on to his employer, which went on to produce and market the product as the Band-Aid. Dickson had a successful career at Johnson & Johnson, rising to vice president before his retirement in 1957. Perhaps a curiosity, the word "Band" in German means tape.

The original Band-Aids were handmade and not very popular. By 1924, Johnson & Johnson introduced a machine that produced sterilized Band-Aids.

In 1951, the first decorative Band-Aids were introduced. They continue to be a commercial success, with such themes as Mickey Mouse, Donald Duck, Oliver & Jenny, Superman, Spider-Man, Hello Kitty, Rocket Power, Rugrats, smiley faces, Barbie, Dora the Explorer, Batman and Duck Dynasty. In addition to white toned and brown toned adhesive bandages, Band-Aid sells sheer strips for any color skin tone that can be purchased in stores or online.[2]

In World War II, millions were shipped overseas, helping popularize the product. Since then, Johnson & Johnson currently has estimated a sale of over 100 billion Band-Aids worldwide.

Johnson & Johnson continues to defend the Band-Aid trademark against it being genericized.[3]

Possible generic term

Band-Aid arguably has, over time, become a generic term in the United States, and a generic term cannot function as a trademark; but Johnson & Johnson has registered Band-Aid as a trademark on the Principal Register of the United States Patent and Trademark Office, and the registration is valid and legal.[4] A registration on the Principal Register does not create ownership rights under the laws of the United States, and a registration may be challenged and removed if the challenger proves as a matter of fact that the alleged trademark has become generic.

Related products

Johnson & Johnson also manufactures liquid bandages, Scar Healing bandages, and Burn-Aid, burn gel-impregnated bandages. Their newest products include Active Flex bandages and waterproof Tough Strips.

To protect the name, their trademark, Johnson & Johnson always refers to its products as "Band-Aid brand", not just Band-Aids.

Manufacturing facilities are located in Brazil, China and Denmark.

See also

References

  1. ^ "BAND-AID® Brand Heritage". Johnson & Johnson. April 2015. Retrieved 2015. 
  2. ^ "Basic Care". BAND-AID® Brand Adhesive Bandages. Retrieved . 
  3. ^ http://www.inta.org/INTABulletin/Pages/PracticalTipsonAvoidingGenericide.aspx
  4. ^ "Trademark Status & Document Retrieval: BAND-AID". USPTO. May 15, 2012. Retrieved 2015. 

External links


  This article uses material from the Wikipedia page available here. It is released under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share-Alike License 3.0.

Band-Aid
 



 

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