Chicago Maroons Men's Basketball
Chicago Maroons men's basketball
2017-18 Chicago Maroons men's basketball team
Chicago Maroons logo.svg
University University of Chicago
Head coach Mike McGrath (17th season)
Conference University Athletic Association (UAA)
Arena Ratner Athletics Center
(Capacity: 1,658)
Nickname Maroons
Colors Maroon and White[1]
         
Pre-tournament Premo-Porretta champions
1909
Pre-tournament Helms champions
1907, 1908, 1909
NCAA Tournament appearances
'Division III' 1997, 1998, 2000, 2001, 2007, 2008
Conference regular season champions
'Big Ten' 1907, 1908, 1909, 1910, 1920, 1924
'UAA' 1997, 1998, 2000, 2001, 2007, 2008

The Chicago Maroons men's basketball team is an NCAA Division III college basketball team competing in the University Athletic Association. Home games are played at the Gerald Ratner Athletics Center, located on the University of Chicago's campus in Chicago.[2]

The team's head coach is currently Mike McGrath.

Team history

The Maroons history in basketball dates to the 1893-94 season in which an organized team representing the university played a schedule of games primarily against YMCA opponents.[3] They continued this type of schedule into the following season, both without a head coach. However, during the 1895-96 season the team added a head coach by the name of Horace Butterworth. Butterworth led the Maroons through two winning seasons and finish his tenure with 10 wins and only 4 losses before leaving Chicago to take on the role of athletic director and head baseball coach at Northwestern. The most notable event during the 1895-96 season for the Maroons was being a part of the first five-on-five college basketball game played in United States history.[4] The game was played at Iowa City with the Maroons finishing victorious by a score of 15 to 12.

After the 1896-97 season, based on a lack of material and disinterest by participants, the University suspended it's men's basketball program and promoted the women's program instead. Finally, in 1903 the program was reinstated and, with the Western Conference backing a conference champion, a varsity schedule was developed by athletic director Stagg. Wilfred Childs became the head coach of the Maroons for this newly developed team that finished the season with seven wins and zero losses, beating teams by an average score of 45 to 11.[5] Childs would coach the Maroons through the 1905-06 season, turning the position over to Joseph Raycroft who would guide the team to four Big Ten Conference championships (then known as the Western Conference), and the 1907, 1908, and 1909 teams were all retroactively named national champions by the Helms Athletic Foundation;[6] his 1909 team was also retroactively named the national champion by the Premo-Porretta Power Poll.[7]

Championships

National Championships

Year Coach Awarding body Record
1907 Joseph Raycroft Helms Athletic Foundation 21-2
1908 Joseph Raycroft Helms Athletic Foundation 23-2
1909 Joseph Raycroft Helms Athletic Foundation, Premo-Porretta Power Poll 12-0
National Championships 3

University Athletic Association Championships[8]

Year Coach Overall Record UAA Record
1997 Pat Cunningham 23-5 13-1
1998 Pat Cunningham 24-3 14-0
2000 Mike McGrath 23-4 15-0
2001 Mike McGrath 24-4 14-1
2007 Mike McGrath 20-6 11-3
2008 Mike McGrath 18-8 11-3
UAA Regular Season Championships 6

[9]

Big Ten Regular Season Championships

Year Coach Overall Record Big Ten Record
1907 § Joseph Raycroft 21-2 6-2
1908 § Joseph Raycroft 23-2 7-1
1909 Joseph Raycroft 12-0 12-0
1910 Joseph Raycroft 10-3 9-3
1920 Pat Page 27-8 10-2
1924 § Nelson Norgren 10-7 8-4
Big Ten Regular Season Championships 6

[10]

§ - Conference Co-champions

Individual honors

Naismith Memorial Basketball Hall of Fame

The following 4 Maroons have been inducted into the Basketball Hall of Fame:

Year Player Inducted as a
1959 John Schommer Player
1959 Amos Alonzo Stagg Contributor
1961 Harlan "Pat" Page Player
1965 Paul "Tony" Hinkle Contributor

Consensus All-American

Player Year(s)
James Ozanne 1905
John Schommer 1906, 1907, 1908, & 1909
James McKeag 1906
Albert Houghton 1907
Pat Page 1908, 1909, & 1910
Nelson Norgren 1914
Tony Hinkle 1919 & 1920
R. D. Birkhoff 1921

[11]

Rhodes Scholars

Player Year(s)
Edwin Hubble 1910
John McDonough 1928
Sean Mahoney 1984
Brad Henderson 2001

[12]

Coaching history

Coach Years Record Conference
Record
Conference
Titles
National
Championships
Horace Butterworth 1895-1897 10-4 0-0 0 0
Wilfred Childs 1903-1906 21-8 3-5 0 0
Joseph Raycroft 1906-1910 66-7 34-5 4 3
John Schommer 1910-1911 13-5 7-5 0 0
Harlan "Pat" Page 1911-1920 161-76 66-42 1 0
Amos Alonzo Stagg 1920-1921 14-6 6-6 0 0
Nelson Norgren 1921-1942
1944-1957
120-272
65-147
52-203
0-12
0 0
J. Kyle Anderson 1942-1944 1-40 0-17 0 0
Joseph Stampf 1957-1975 208-118 * * 0
John Angelus 1975-1991 146-177 65-117 0 0
Pat Cunningham 1991-1999 115-91 62-50 2 0
Mike McGrath 1999- 237-170 142-84 4 0
Totals 1,166-1,128 437-546 11 3

[13]

Maroons home courts

University of Chicago Gymnasium
Bartlett Gymnasium
Henry Crown Field House
Ratner Athletic Center
  • Men's Gymnasium was located on the campus of the University of Chicago, a temporary structure built in 1891 and demolished in 1904.
  • Bartlett Gymnasium (1903-1932) is located on the campus of the University of Chicago, the building is named after Frank Dickinson Bartlett. Bartlett's father, Adolphus Clay Bartlett, erected the gym as a memorial to his son who died of appendicitis in Munich, Bavaria, July 15, 1900, at the age of twenty years.[14]
  • Henry Crown Field House (1933-2003) erected in 1932 as a single-story building. It originally served as an indoor practice facility with a dirt infield that was utilized for football and baseball practices. A track encircled the infield and a raised wood floor was used for basketball. It is named after Chicago philanthropist Henry Crown.
  • Gerald Ratner Athletics Center (2003-present) opened on September 29, 2003 and continues to attract attention for its design and construction. The building was named after University of Chicago alumnus, Gerald Ratner.[15] It has earned numerous awards for its engineering and material usage. The architect of this suspension structure that is supported by masts, cables and counterweights was César Pelli, who is best known as the architect of the Petronas Towers.

References

  1. ^ "Color Palette | University Communications". Retrieved 2016. 
  2. ^ University of Chicago Record Book
  3. ^ [1], The Cap and Gown
  4. ^ "The Game That Developed". Big Ten Men's Basketball History. Big Ten Conference. Retrieved 2014. 
  5. ^ The Cap and Gown, published 1904, p. 240
  6. ^ "NCAA Division I Men's Basketball - NCAA Division I Champions". Rauzulu's Street. 2004. Retrieved 2014. 
  7. ^ ESPN, ed. (2009). ESPN College Basketball Encyclopedia: The Complete History of the Men's Game. New York, NY: ESPN Books. p. 531. ISBN 978-0-345-51392-2. 
  8. ^ http://athletics.uchicago.edu/sports/mbkb/record-book-mbk.pdf
  9. ^ http://grfx.cstv.com/photos/schools/big10/genrel/auto_pdf/2012-13/misc_non_event/b1gupdatedrecordsbookfront.pdf
  10. ^ http://grfx.cstv.com/photos/schools/big10/genrel/auto_pdf/2012-13/misc_non_event/b1gupdatedrecordsbookfront.pdf
  11. ^ [2], Sports-Reference.com
  12. ^ [3], University of Chicago Athletics
  13. ^ [4], 2015-16 University of Chicago Media Guide page 17
  14. ^ The University of Chicago Magazine, Volume 12 By The Alumni Council, November, 1919 pg.138
  15. ^ "Crain's Chicago Business : Subscription Center". Chicagobusiness.com. Retrieved . 

External links


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