Cleveland, Columbus, Cincinnati and Indianapolis Railway
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Cleveland, Columbus, Cincinnati and Indianapolis Railway
Cleveland, Columbus, Cincinnati and Indianapolis Railway
Locale Indiana and Ohio
Dates of operation 1868–1889
Successor Cleveland, Cincinnati, Chicago and St. Louis Railroad
Track gauge
Headquarters Cleveland, Ohio

The Cleveland, Columbus, Cincinnati and Indianapolis Railway was formed from the merger of the Cleveland, Columbus and Cincinnati Railroad with the Bellefontaine Railway in 1868. The Bellefontaine had been formed by a merger of the Bellefontaine and Indiana Railroad and the Indianapolis, Pittsburgh and Cleveland Railroad in 1864.

Genealogy[1]

  • Cleveland, Columbus, Cincinnati and Indianapolis Railway
    • Bellefontaine Railroad 1868
      • Bellefontaine and Indiana Railroad 1864
      • Indianapolis, Pittsburgh and Cleveland Railroad 1864
        • Indianapolis and Bellefontaine Railroad 1855
    • Cleveland, Columbus and Cincinnati Railroad 1868
      • Springfield, Mt. Vernon and Pittsburgh Railroad 1862

History

The CCC&I, after its formation in 1868, sought to make a connection to Cincinnati. This connection was never realized by its predecessor line the Cleveland Columbus and Cincinnati Railroad which only ran trains between Cleveland and Columbus. By 1872, the CCC&I made agreements to operate the Cincinnati and Springfield Railroad between Cincinnati and Dayton and the Cincinnati, Sandusky and Cleveland Railroad between Dayton and Springfield, finally providing a through route from Cleveland to Columbus to Cincinnati. In 1889, the CCC&I merged with lines in Indiana and Illinois to form the Cleveland, Cincinnati, Chicago and St. Louis Railway, known as the Big Four Route. It eventually became a part of the New York Central Railroad.

See also

References

  1. ^ RAILROADS IN NORTH AMERICA; Some Historical Facts and An Introduction to an Electronic Database of North American Railroads and Their Evolution by M. C. Hallberg (April 24, 2006) [1]

Resources

  • Steiner, Rowlee. "A Review of Columbus Railroads", 1952, unpublished 125 page manuscript available from the library of the Ohio Historical Society, 1982 Velma Drive, Columbus, Ohio 43211

  This article uses material from the Wikipedia page available here. It is released under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share-Alike License 3.0.

Cleveland,_Columbus,_Cincinnati_and_Indianapolis_Railway
 



 

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