Collin County, Texas
Collin County, TX Events Directory
 
About Collin County, TX
Collin County, Texas
County
Collin County
Collin county tx courthouse.jpg
The Collin County Courthouse in McKinney
Flag of Collin County, Texas
Flag
Seal of Collin County, Texas
Seal
Map of Texas highlighting Collin County
Location in the U.S. state of Texas
Map of the United States highlighting Texas
Texas's location in the U.S.
Founded 1846
Named for Collin McKinney
Seat McKinney
Largest city Plano
Area
 o Total 886 sq mi (2,295 km2)
 o Land 841 sq mi (2,178 km2)
 o Water 45 sq mi (117 km2), 5.1%
Population (est.)
 o (2015) 914,127
 o Density 1,053/sq mi (407/km²)
Congressional districts 3rd, 4th, 32nd
Central: UTC-6/-5
Website www.co.collin.tx.us

Collin County is a county in the U.S. state of Texas. As of the 2010 United States Census, the county's population was 782,341,[1] making it the seventh-most populous county in Texas and the 63rd-largest county by population in the United States. The 2016 Census Bureau estimate for Collin County's population is 939,585.[2] Its county seat is McKinney.[3]

Collin County is part of the Dallas-Fort Worth-Arlington, Texas Metropolitan Statistical Area. A small portion of the city of Dallas is in the county.

History

Both the county and the county seat were named after Collin McKinney[4] (1766-1861), one of the five men who drafted the Texas Declaration of Independence and the oldest of the 59 men who signed it.

Geography

According to the U.S. Census Bureau, the county has an area of 886 square miles (2,290 km2), of which 841 square miles (2,180 km2) is land and 45 square miles (120 km2) (5.1%) is covered by water.[5]

Lakes

Major highways

Neighbouring counties

Demographics

2015 Texas Population Estimate Program

As of the 2015 Texas Population Estimate Program, the population of the county was 923,201, non-Hispanic whites 535,165 (57.9%). Black Americans 84,858 (9.2%). Other non-Hispanic 146,109 (15.8%). Hispanics and Latinos (of any race) 157,069 (17.0%).[8]

2010 Census

As of the census of 2010, there were 782,341 people.

According to U.S. Census figures released in 2006, the racial makeup of the county was as follows: 77.21% White, 7.26% African American, 10.02% Asian, 0.45% Native American, 5.06% of other or mixed race. 12.8% Hispanic of any race.

2000 Census

As of the census[9] of 2000, there were 491,675 people, 181,970 households, and 132,292 families residing in the county. The population density was 580 people per square mile (224/km²). There were 194,892 housing units at an average density of 230 per square mile (89/km²). The racial makeup of the county was 81.39% White, 4.79% Black or African American, 0.47% Native American, 6.92% Asian, 0.05% Pacific Islander, 4.26% from other races, and 2.11% from two or more races. 10.27% of the population were Hispanic or Latino of any race.

There were 181,970 households out of which 40.60% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 62.10% were married couples living together, 7.50% had a female householder with no husband present, and 27.30% were non-families. 22.10% of all households were made up of individuals and 3.10% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.68 and the average family size was 3.18. As of the 2010 census, there were about 4.4 same-sex couples per 1,000 households in the county.[10]

In the county, the population was spread out with 28.70% under the age of 18, 7.40% from 18 to 24, 37.90% from 25 to 44, 20.70% from 45 to 64, and 5.30% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 33 years. For every 100 females there were 99.80 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 97.80 males.

The median income for a household in the county was $70,835, and the median income for a family was $81,856 (these figures had risen to $77,671 and $91,881 respectively as of a 2007 estimate).[11] Males had a median income of $57,392 versus $36,604 for females. The per capita income for the county was $33,345. About 3.30% of families and 4.90% of the population were below the poverty line, including 5.10% of those under age 18 and 7.10% of those age 65 or over. Based on median household income, as of 2006, Collin County is the second richest county in Texas after Fort Bend, and is considered one of the wealthiest counties in the United States.

However, Collin - like other Texas counties - has one of the nation's highest property tax rates. In 2007, it was #21 for property taxes as percentage of the homes value on owner occupied housing.[12] It also ranked in the Top 100 for amount of property taxes paid and for percentage of taxes of income. Part of this is due to the Robin Hood plan school financing system in Texas.[13]

Government, Courts, and Politics

Government

Collin County, like all counties in Texas, is governed by a Commissioners Court. The court consists of the county judge (the chairperson of the Court), who is elected county-wide, and four commissioners who are elected by the voters in each of four precincts.[14]

County Commissioners[15]

Office Name Party
  County Judge Keith Self Republican
  Commissioner, Precinct 1 Susan Fletcher Republican
  Commissioner, Precinct 2 Cheryl Williams Republican
  Commissioner, Precinct 3 John Thomas Republican
  Commissioner, Precinct 4 Duncan Webb Republican

County Officials[15]

Office Name Party
  County Clerk Stacey Kemp Republican
  Criminal District Attorney Greg Willis Republican
  District Clerk Lynne Finley Republican
  Sheriff Jim Skinner Republican
  Tax Assessor-Collector Kenneth Maun Republican

Constables[15]

Office Name Party
  Constable, Precinct 1 Shane Williams Republican
  Constable, Precinct 2 Gary Edwards Republican
  Constable, Precinct 3 Sammy Knapp Republican
  Constable, Precinct 4 Joe Wright Republican

Justices of the Peace[15]

Office Name Party
  Justice of the Peace, Precinct 1 Paul Raleeh Republican
  Justice of the Peace, Precinct 2 Jerry Shaffer Republican
  Justice of the Peace, Precinct 3, Place 1 Chuck Ruckel Republican
  Justice of the Peace, Precinct 3, Place 2 John Payton Republican
  Justice of the Peace, Precinct 4 Mike Yarbrough Republican

Courts

County Courts at Law[15]

Office Name Party
  County Court at Law 1 Corrine Mason Republican
  County Court at Law 2 Barnett Walker Republican
  County Court at Law 3 Lance S. Baxter Republican
  County Court at Law 4 David Rippel Republican
  County Court at Law 5 Dan Wilson Republican
  County Court at Law 6 Jay A. Bender Republican
  County Court at Law 7 David Waddill Republican

County Probate Court[15]

Office Name Party
  County Probate Court 1 Weldon Copeland Republican

District Courts[15]

Office Name Party
  199th District Court Angela Tucker Republican
  219th District Court Scott Becker Republican
  296th District Court John Roach, Jr. Republican
  366th District Court Ray Wheless Republican
  380th District Court Benjamin N. Smith Republican
  401st District Court Andrea Thompson Republican
  417th District Court Cynthia Wheless Republican
  429th District Court Jill Willis Republican
  469th District Court Piper McCraw Republican
  470th District Court Emily Miskel Republican

Politics

Presidential Elections Results[16]
Year Republican Democratic Third Parties
2016 55.2% 201,014 38.6% 140,624 6.3% 22,792
2012 64.9% 196,888 33.4% 101,415 1.7% 5,264
2008 62.2% 184,897 36.7% 109,047 1.2% 3,513
2004 71.2% 174,435 28.1% 68,935 0.7% 1,784
2000 73.1% 128,179 24.5% 42,884 2.5% 4,357
1996 63.0% 83,750 28.5% 37,854 8.5% 11,321
1992 47.0% 60,514 19.0% 24,508 34.0% 43,811
1988 74.3% 67,776 25.1% 22,934 0.6% 520
1984 81.6% 61,095 18.2% 13,604 0.2% 139
1980 67.9% 36,559 28.2% 15,187 3.9% 2,115
1976 60.0% 21,608 39.0% 14,039 1.0% 353
1972 78.0% 17,667 21.1% 4,783 0.8% 187
1968 39.9% 6,494 36.4% 5,918 23.7% 3,850
1964 29.9% 3,341 70.0% 7,833 0.2% 19
1960 42.2% 3,865 57.1% 5,229 0.7% 64
1956 41.8% 3,823 57.8% 5,280 0.4% 34
1952 40.6% 4,037 59.4% 5,906 0.1% 7
1948 15.9% 1,155 76.1% 5,516 8.0% 579
1944 11.7% 974 78.8% 6,574 9.5% 796
1940 12.2% 1,028 87.7% 7,373 0.1% 11
1936 8.6% 531 91.3% 5,669 0.2% 10
1932 8.8% 589 90.5% 6,059 0.8% 50
1928 50.6% 3,476 49.1% 3,377 0.3% 23
1924 21.2% 1,981 77.0% 7,215 1.8% 169
1920 23.2% 1,338 70.0% 4,045 6.8% 395
1916 12.0% 594 83.9% 4,141 4.0% 198
1912 9.1% 342 84.6% 3,187 6.3% 239

Collin County is a Republican stronghold in presidential and congressional elections. The last Democrat to win the county was Lyndon Johnson in 1964. As the northern Dallas suburbs spilled into Collin County in the late 1960s and early 1970s, its politics immediately swung to the Republican Party.

State Board of Education member[17]

District Name Party
  District 12 Geraldine "Tincy" Miller Republican

Texas State Representatives[18]

District Name Party Residence
  District 33 Justin Holland Republican Heath
  District 66 Matt Shaheen Republican Plano
  District 67 Jeff Leach Republican Plano
  District 70 Scott Sanford Republican McKinney
  District 89 Jodie Anne Laudenburg Republican Parker

Texas State Senators[19]

District Name Party Residence
  District 8 Van Taylor Republican Plano
  District 30 Craig Estes Republican Wichita Falls

United States Representatives[20]

District Name Party Residence
  Texas's 3rd congressional district Sam Johnson Republican Plano
  Texas's 4th congressional district John Ratcliffe Republican Heath
  Texas's 32nd congressional district Pete Sessions Republican Dallas

Education

The following school districts lie entirely within Collin County:

The following districts lie partly within the county:

Colleges and universities

Collin College [21] opened its first campus on Highway 380 in McKinney in 1985. The college has grown to seven campuses/locations--two in McKinney and two in Plano and as well as Frisco, Allen and Rockwall. Dallas Baptist University [22] also has an extension site in Frisco, DBU Frisco. The majority of the University of Texas at Dallas campus in Richardson, Texas lies within Collin County.[23]

Parks

Collin County Parks and Open Spaces

Media

Collin County is part of the Dallas/Fort Worth DMA. Local media outlets are: KDFW-TV, KXAS-TV, WFAA-TV, KTVT-TV, KERA-TV, KTXA-TV, KDFI-TV, KDAF-TV, and KFWD-TV. Other nearby stations that provide coverage for Collin County come from the Sherman/Denison market and they include: KTEN-TV and KXII-TV.

Newspapers in the Collin County area include the Allen American, Celina Record, Frisco Enterprise, McKinney Courier-Gazette, and the Plano Star-Courier. Nearby publications The Dallas Morning News and the Fort Worth Star-Telegram also provide news coverage of cities in the county.

Communities

Cities (multiple counties)

Cities

Towns

Census-designated place

Other unincorporated communities

Historical communities

Ghost towns

Notable people

See also

References

  1. ^ a b "State & County QuickFacts". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved 2013. 
  2. ^ a b "Population and Housing Unit Estimates". Retrieved 2017. 
  3. ^ "Find a County". National Association of Counties. Archived from the original on 2011-05-31. Retrieved . 
  4. ^ Gannett, Henry (1905). The Origin of Certain Place Names in the United States. Govt. Print. Off. p. 87. 
  5. ^ "2010 Census Gazetteer Files". United States Census Bureau. August 22, 2012. Retrieved 2015. 
  6. ^ "U.S. Decennial Census". United States Census Bureau. Archived from the original on May 12, 2015. Retrieved 2015. 
  7. ^ "Texas Almanac: Population History of Counties from 1850-2010" (PDF). Texas Almanac. Retrieved 2015. 
  8. ^ Estimates of the Population by Age, Sex, and Race/Ethnicity for July 1, 2015 for State of Texas (PDF), July 15, 2015, retrieved 2017 
  9. ^ "American FactFinder". United States Census Bureau. Archived from the original on 2013-09-11. Retrieved . 
  10. ^ Where Same-Sex Couples Live, June 26, 2015, retrieved 2015 
  11. ^ Collin County, Texas - Fact Sheet - American FactFinder. Retrieved on 2009-05-21.
  12. ^ http://www.taxfoundation.org/research/show/1888.html Archived 2010-04-29 at the Wayback Machine. Taxfoundation.org
  13. ^ https://query.nytimes.com/gst/fullpage.html?res=9F04E5DB173BF934A35753C1A9629C8B63 Query.nytimes.com
  14. ^ "Commissioners Court". www.collincountytx.gov. Retrieved . 
  15. ^ a b c d e f g "Government". www.collincountytx.gov. Retrieved . 
  16. ^ http://uselectionatlas.org/RESULTS
  17. ^ "Texas Redistricting". www.tlc.state.tx.us. Retrieved . 
  18. ^ "Texas Redistricting". www.tlc.state.tx.us. Retrieved . 
  19. ^ "Texas Redistricting". www.tlc.state.tx.us. Retrieved . 
  20. ^ "Texas Redistricting". www.tlc.state.tx.us. Retrieved . 
  21. ^ Collin College website
  22. ^ DBU website
  23. ^ http://www.cor.net/modules/showdocument.aspx?documentid=426

External links

Coordinates: 33°11?N 96°35?W / 33.18°N 96.58°W / 33.18; -96.58


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