Danica Patrick
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Danica Patrick
Danica Patrick
TSM350 - 2015 - Danica Patrick - 3 - Stierch.jpg
Born Danica Sue Patrick
(1982-03-25) March 25, 1982 (age 35)
Beloit, Wisconsin
Height 5 ft 2 in (1.57 m)[1]
Weight 100 lb (45 kg)[1]
Achievements Multiple firsts for women in American auto racing, including first to win an IndyCar Series race, first to clinch a pole position in the Monster Energy NASCAR Cup Series and the most starts, laps led, and top-tens in the Monster Energy NASCAR Cup Series
Awards 2005 Indianapolis 500 Rookie of the Year
2005 IndyCar Series season Rookie of the Year
IndyCar Series Most Popular Driver 2005-2010
2012 NASCAR Nationwide Series Most Popular Driver
Monster Energy NASCAR Cup Series career
190 races run over 5 years
2017 position 28th
Best finish 24th (2015, 2016)
First race 2012 Daytona 500 (Daytona)
Last race 2017 Ford EcoBoost 400 (Homestead)
Wins Top tens Poles
0 7 1
NASCAR Xfinity Series career
61 races run over 5 years
2014 position 108th
Best finish 10th (2012)
First race 2010 DRIVE4COPD 300 (Daytona)
Last race 2014 DRIVE4COPD 300 (Daytona)
Wins Top tens Poles
0 7 1
IndyCar Series career
115 races run over 7 years
Best finish 5th (2009)
First race 2005 Toyota Indy 300 (Homestead)
Last race 2011 IZOD IndyCar World Championship (Las Vegas)
First win 2008 Indy Japan 300 (Motegi)
Wins Podiums Poles
1 7 3
Statistics current as of November 19, 2017.

Danica Sue Patrick (; born March 25, 1982) is an American professional racing driver, model, and advertising spokeswoman. She is the most successful woman in the history of American open-wheel racing--her win in the 2008 Indy Japan 300 is the only female victory in an IndyCar Series race and her third place in the 2009 Indianapolis 500 is the highest finish there by a woman. She competed in the series from 2005 to 2011. In 2012, she competed in the NASCAR Nationwide Series and occasionally in the NASCAR Sprint Cup Series.

Born to a working-class family in Beloit, Wisconsin, Patrick began karting at the age of ten and achieved early success by winning her class in the World Karting Association Grand National Championship three times in the mid-1990s. She dropped out of high school with her parents' permission in 1998, and moved to the United Kingdom to further her career. Patrick competed in Formula Vauxhall and Formula Ford before returning to the United States in 2001 due to a lack of funding. For 2002, she competed in five Barber Dodge Pro Series races for Rahal Letterman Racing. Patrick later raced in the Toyota Atlantic Series for the next two years. Her best effort was third in the championship standings for the 2004 season where she became the first woman to win a pole position in the series.

She first drove in the IndyCar Series with Rahal Letterman Racing in 2005, and took three pole positions, equaling Tomas Scheckter's record of poles in a rookie season. She was named the Rookie of the Year for both the 2005 Indianapolis 500 and the 2005 IndyCar Series. She improved over the next two years with Rahal Letterman Racing in 2006 and later Andretti Green Racing in 2007. In 2008, Patrick followed up her first victory to place sixth overall in the drivers' standings. She improved on this to secure fifth the following season, which saw her finish a career-high third at the Indianapolis 500, the best performance by any woman at the race. Patrick's overall form declined during 2010, but she still managed two second-places at oval tracks before stepping away from IndyCar after the 2011 season to focus full-time on stock car racing.

Patrick began racing stock cars in 2010 in the NASCAR Nationwide Series (now Xfinity Series) with her best result coming in the form of a fourth-place finish at Las Vegas Motor Speedway in 2011. She placed a career-high tenth in the 2012 season standings, and was the second woman to clinch a pole position in the Nationwide Series since Shawna Robinson in 1994. Patrick started in the Sprint Cup Series (now Monster Energy NASCAR Cup Series) in 2012. She became the first woman to win a Cup Series pole position by setting the fastest lap in qualifying for the 2013 Daytona 500, finishing eighth. Patrick bested Janet Guthrie's record for the most top-ten finishes by a woman in the Sprint Cup Series in 2015. She announced her intention to step away from full-time racing after the 2017 season, and plans to compete at the 2018 Daytona 500 and the 2018 Indianapolis 500.

Early life

Beloit, Wisconsin, where Patrick was born in 1982.

Patrick was born on March 25, 1982, in Beloit, Wisconsin.[2] She is the daughter of working-class parents Beverly Ann (née Flaten) and Terry Joseph "T. J." Patrick Jr.[3][4] Her parents met on a blind date at a snowmobile event in the 1970s when Bev was a mechanic for a friend's snowmobile. T. J. raced snowmobiles, motocross, and midget cars.[5] They have owned a Java Hut and a plate glass company.[6] Patrick has a younger sister, Brooke, a pediatric physical therapist.[7] She was raised in nearby Roscoe, Illinois.[8] Patrick was a cheerleader at Hononegah Community High School in Rockton, Illinois in 1996, and spent her off-time babysitting for a family down the road when she was not racing.[9] When the girls were ten and eight respectively, their parents sought a hobby that would bring the family closer together. They saved money to purchase a pontoon boat, but its owner did not respond to their offer.[7] The sisters told their parents of their wish to race go-karts after a friend of Brooke's allowed her to drive one; they both received a go-kart.[5]

Patrick karting at Sugar River Raceway in Brodhead, Wisconsin.[a][10] Her father acted as her crew chief while her mother kept statistics on her racing.[11] Patrick had no role models or idols; she was never "striving to achieve female goals," but aspired to "be the best [she] could be."[12] In her debut race, she crashed into a concentrate wall at 25 mph (40 km/h) due to a brake failure. She emerged from the wreck uninjured.[5][7] Patrick improved to finish second out of twenty drivers at the year's end after a twenty-two race schedule.[13] She gradually improved her eye to foot coordination, allowing her to set numerous age track records at Sugar River Raceway and Michiana Raceway Park.[14] At age 13, Patrick asked her parents about moving to California so she could compete throughout the year; they declined, citing business commitments.[10] Nevertheless, her father flew her to the Midwestern United States, and the rest of the country, to enable her to race. To help defray travel expenses, the family sold merchandise of Patrick, and imposed a rule that prevented her from undertaking activities that would harm her public image.[15]

She won ten regional karting titles, and the World Karting Association Grand National Championship in the Yamaha Sportsman, and later HPV class three times: in 1994, 1996 and 1997.[b][8] Patrick was accepted into the Indianapolis-based Lyn St. James Foundation Driver Development Program in 1996. She was taught auto racing's business ventures, and her driving abilities were further refined.[6] Her father often contacted newspapers weekly to chronicle his daughter's performance. Additionally, ABC and MTV ran television segments on Patrick in 1996.[16] This exposure led to her being hired by John Mecom Jr. (introduced to Patrick by St. James two years earlier) to compete in the United Kingdom racing circuit.[16][14] Patrick and her father visited Mecom's family who agreed to sponsor her on the condition she was sent to a high-quality driving school for further refinement of her racing abilities.[5] She ended up attending three driving schools, including Track Speed School at Sebring International Raceway and the Formula Ford driving school.[13][17] Patrick later competed in a Sports Car Club of America race at Daytona International Speedway in May 1998.[13]

Junior formulae (1998-2004)

Bobby Rahal (pictured in 2004) hired Patrick on a three-year contract to race for his team, Rahal Letterman Racing.

Patrick was granted permission from her parents to drop out of high school midway through her junior year in 1998, and obtained a GED certification.[6][15] She moved by herself to England to advance her racing career, and resided in the Buckinghamshire town of Milton Keynes.[15] Patrick was aided by three-time Formula One world champion Jackie Stewart,[6] and socialized with drivers such as Jenson Button.[18] Being both American and female, she was met with much opposition, but this experience helped her develop a stronger sense of independence and learnt how to overcome adversity.[15] Patrick received some financial backing from the Ford Motor Company,[5] although she later lost Mecom's support after one season following rumors that she was living an extravagant lifestyle. She successfully persuaded her father to underwrite her career.[14]

During the three years Patrick spent in the United Kingdom, she raced in Formula Vauxhall and Formula Ford,[10] coming ninth in points in the 1999 British Formula Vauxhall Championship.[5] She competed for Haywood Racing in Formula Ford, and was the lead test driver for Mygale.[17] Patrick was uncompetitive in Formula Ford, claiming the equipment she received was of poor quality.[14] Nevertheless, she came second in the 2000 Formula Ford Festival at Brands Hatch in an outdated Haywood Racing vehicle, tying Danny Sullivan's best performance by an American in the event.[5] That strong result led to her receiving a Formula Three test with Carlin in 2001. Jaguar Racing team principal Bobby Rahal organized a second test for her with the expectation it would lead to her being put on the Paul Stewart Racing development program, but it was cancelled in the summer of 2001, after Rahal was fired by new owner Niki Lauda.[6][19] That year, she was awarded the Gorsline Scholarship Award as the most aspiring road course competitor, and was recognized as the top female open wheel race car driver with experience on the international scene.[8]

Patrick had a difficult season as the Mgyale cars she drove did not suit her smooth driving style, and was outpaced by her teammates. Ford later terminated her program as they suspected the capital they put forward to her was being misused, and felt she was not getting enough technical support.[19] Thus, Patrick returned to the United States later that year after her funding dried up.[3][16] Patrick began negotiations to drive a BMW M3 for Team PTG in the American Le Mans Series in 2002, which ended when BMW withdrew due of a technological dispute.[19][20] Her 2002 campaign started with the fund-raising Toyota Pro/Celebrity Race, defeating Tommy Kendall to win the professional class, and placed third overall.[21] Patrick and her father travelled to race tracks on weekends with expectations of her being hired by a team owner.[3] She spoke to Rahal about a race seat in June that year; he signed her to a three-year contract at Milwaukee Mile.[14] That month, Patrick tested the ppc Racing Ford Taurus NASCAR Busch Series car in a two-day test session at Greenville-Pickens Speedway.[22]

She took part in five races in the Barber Dodge Pro Series, placing 13th with a best finish of fourth at Molson Indy Vancouver.[23] Patrick switched to the Toyota Atlantic Series in 2003, and was the first woman to race in the championship since 1974. The season saw her secure the first podium for a woman in series history at the season-opening race in Monterey. She improved on this by coming second in Miami at the year's end. Patrick placed sixth in the drivers' standings with five top-five finishes.[23] In June that year, she made her sports car debut at the Grand Prix of Atlanta (part of the American Le Mans Series), partnering Jérôme Policand in the No. 80 GTS-class Prodrive Ferrari 550, finishing fourth in class and tenth overall.[24] In 2004, Patrick competed in the Toyota Atlantic Series for the second consecutive year, becoming the first woman to win a pole position in series history at the Portland International Raceway race. She took the points lead after finishing second, making her the first woman to lead the championship standings.[23] Patrick ended the season third in points with ten top-five finishes in twelve races.[14]

IndyCar Series career

2005-2007 (First years with Rahal Letterman Racing and Andretti Green Racing)

In December 2004, Rahal Letterman Racing named Patrick to their IndyCar Series roster for 2005 after the team found the resources to run a third car.[25] She debuted at the season-opening race at Homestead-Miami Speedway, starting ninth, and heavily crashing out which led to her being hospitalized for a mild concussion.[26] In the season's fourth race, the Indy Japan 300 at Twin Ring Motegi, Patrick started second, and led 32 laps before settling for her best finish of the season, fourth.[27] After setting the fastest overall practice speed at the Indianapolis 500, she started fourth and missed out on winning the race as she was required to conserve fuel. She came fourth after leading 19 laps and achieved multiple firsts for women at the track.[28] Patrick took her first career pole position at the season's eighth race at Kansas Speedway, becoming the second woman in IndyCar Series history to achieve the feat after Sarah Fisher in 2002.[29] She took two more pole positions at Kentucky Speedway and Chicagoland Speedway to match Tomas Scheckter's record for the most pole positions in a rookie season.[30] Patrick ended 2005 with an 18th-place finish at California Speedway after a clash with Jaques Lazier,[31] finishing her rookie season with 325 points (12th in the points' standings) and seven top-ten finishes.[32] She was named Rookie of the Year for both the Indianapolis 500 and the IndyCar Series.[2]

Patrick driving for Rahal Letterman Racing at the 2006 Indianapolis 500

Patrick returned to Rahal Letterman Racing for the 2006 season.[33] In January, she made her endurance racing debut at the 24 Hours of Daytona, co-driving a Howard-Boss Motorsports Daytona Prototype-class Pontiac Crawford shared by Rusty Wallace, Allan McNish and Jan Lammers. The quartet were in contention for the victory but retired from overheating problems.[34] Although she qualified third for the season-opening Toyota Indy 300, her team withdrew after teammate Paul Dana was killed in a heavy practice session accident on the day of the race.[35] Thus, Patrick's 2006 IndyCar campaign began at the first road course round of the season, the Grand Prix of St. Petersburg, finishing sixth,[33] and came eighth at the Indy Japan 300 at Motegi.[36] At the Indianapolis 500, she started tenth. Patrick finished the race in eighth position. The rest of her season was modest with four top-tens which included a season-high placing of consecutive fourth-position finishes: firstly at the Firestone Indy 200 at Nashville Speedway and then the ABC Supply Company A.J. Foyt 225 at Milwaukee Mile. Patrick came ninth in the final standings with 302 points.[36] In November, the March of Dimes awarded her the title of Sportswoman of the Year in celebration of her dedication and success.[37]

Patrick at a post-season test session at Barber Motorsports Park in October 2007

Before the 2007 season, Patrick moved to Andretti Green Racing, in place of Bryan Herta in its No. 7 Dallara-IR05 Honda.[38] She opened her account of the season with two top-ten finishes in the first four races (eighth at St. Petersburg and seventh at Kansas).[39] Patrick started the Indianapolis 500 in eighth position. She raced competitively with the leaders, and finished in the same position he started in, when the race was halted by rain after 166 laps.[40] Patrick clinched her second consecutive eighth-place finish at the ABC Supply Company A.J. Foyt 225 which was overshadowed by a physical confrontation with Dan Wheldon;[41] the two reconciled after privately meeting with IndyCar president Brian Barnhart.[42] She took her then best career finish with a third at the Bombardier Learjet 550,[43] and improved on this result by clinching second at the season's penultimate race, the Detroit Indy Grand Prix at Belle Isle Street Circuit.[44] Patrick closed off the year by coming eleventh at the season-closing the Peak Antifreeze Indy 300 at Chicagoland Speedway, to place seventh in the drivers' standings with 424 points and eleven top-ten finishes.[39]

2008-2009 (First victory and peak performance)

Patrick won her first race at the 2008 Indy Japan 300, and became first woman to win an IndyCar Series event.

To begin the 2008 season, her second with Andretti Green Racing, Patrick scored her then best career Homestead finish of sixth. She followed that up with another top ten by scoring a tenth-place finish at St. Petersburg.[45] At the Indy Japan 300 at Twin Ring Motegi on April 20, Patrick moved to the front of the field with three laps remaining after the previous leaders were forced to make pit stops for fuel and held the first position to secure her maiden IndyCar victory.[46] This triumph made her the first woman to win a top-level sanctioned open wheel car racing event.[47] At the season's fourth round at Kansas Speedway, Patrick finished 19th after a hubcap failure.[45] After qualifying fifth for the Indianapolis 500, she retired from the race early after a collision in the pit lane. As Ryan Briscoe exited his pitbox, the two cars collided, and both were eliminated from the race.[48] Thereafter, Patrick finished within the top ten for five of the next six races in the season.[45] At Mid-Ohio Sports Car Course, she had an incident with Milka Duno in practice. Patrick walked to Duno's pit stall, and confronted her before walking away.[49] She ended the season with three further top-ten finishes with a best of fifth at Infineon Raceway.[45] Patrick finished sixth in the final standings with 379 points, the highest placed American over the course of the season.[50]

Patrick's car at the Indianapolis Motor Speedway in 2009.

In the 2009 off-season, she made her second appearance at the 24 Hours of Daytona and teamed up with Casey Mears, Andy Wallace, and Rob Finlay in the No. 2 Daytona Prototype class Pontiac Crawford DP08 fielded by Childress-Howard Motorsports, finishing eighth in class and overall after overcoming several mechanical issues.[51] Patrick again returned to Andretti Green Racing for the 2009 season.[52] She placed 19th in the first race of the season, the Grand Prix of St. Petersburg, after clashing with Raphael Matos while in ninth place.[52] Patrick recovered to finish fourth and fifth in the next two races of the season, at Long Beach and Kansas.[53] She took her best career finish in five attempts at the Indianapolis 500 by finishing in third position. Patrick set a new record for the highest finish in Indianapolis 500 history.[54] For the rest of the season, she scored seven more top-ten finishes with her best efforts being a pair of fifth positions at the Milwaukee and Richmond races.[55] Patrick finished the season fifth overall in the point standings, her highest finish to date. This fifth-place finish was not only the highest of any of the Andretti drivers, but of any non-Penske or Chip Ganassi Racing driver for the season.[56] In December, she signed a contract extension that would see her through the next two seasons, with the option for a third in 2012.[57]

2010-2011 (Final two full-time IndyCar seasons)

Patrick's racing for Andretti at the 2011 Indy Japan: The Final

The 2010 season saw Patrick return to drive with the newly renamed Andretti Autosport in the IndyCar Series, as well as a limited schedule with JR Motorsports in the NASCAR Nationwide Series (now Xfinity Series).[57] As in the previous year, her season started poorly as she could only muster a 15th-place finish at the inaugural São Paulo Indy 300 after spinning in inclement weather conditions.[58] Nevertheless, at the season's second round, the delayed Honda Grand Prix of St. Petersburg, Patrick made her first appearance in the top ten by placing seventh.[59] At the Indianapolis 500, she qualified a career low 23rd; in the race, Patrick struggled with her car en route to finishing sixth.[60] The Firestone 550 at Texas Motor Speedway one week later saw her best performance of the season which saw her lead one lap and finished in second.[61] Att the Indy Grand Prix of Sonoma, Patrick set a new series record for the most consecutive races running at the finish with her 29th event passing without her failing to finish.[62] She ended her season by equalling her best result of the season in the final IndyCar race at Homestead-Miami Speedway which enabled her to finish tenth in the drivers' standings on 367 points.[63]

In January 2011, Patrick was required per her contract to inform Andretti team owner Michael Andretti of her plans for 2012, and she told him of her intention to leave.[64] The beginning of the 2011 season saw her struggle in comparison with her previous two years at Andretti. Patrick twice suffered car damage at the season-opening Grand Prix of St. Petersburg, after collisions with Justin Wilson and J. R. Hildebrand relegated her to twelfth.[65] She struggled in qualifying for the Indianapolis 500, as she was placed at the back of the qualifying line, due to her car failing a technical inspection, and took 26th despite rain threatening to stop her setting a lap time.[66] In the race, Patrick led ten laps and settled for tenth after conserving fuel.[67] Henceforth, she took a further six top-ten finishes heading into the final race of the season with her best finish coming at the Milwaukee 225 (fifth).[68] At the season-closing IndyCar World Championship at Las Vegas Motor Speedway, Patrick was one of nineteen drivers who avoided a fifteen car pile-up that killed of Dan Wheldon; the race was abandoned and she (and the rest of the field) was not scored.[69] This was her final regular season IndyCar race as she announced in August 2011 of her plans to focus on the NASCAR Sprint Cup Series and Nationwide Series full-time from 2012.[c][71] Patrick placed tenth in the drivers' standings with 314 points.[68]

Stock car career

2010-2011 (ARCA & Nationwide Series)

Patrick began her stock car racing career by entering an ARCA Racing Series race in the No. 7 JR Motorsports Chevrolet at Daytona International Speedway. She finished in sixth place after spinning early in the race.[72][73] At the season-opening Nationwide Series race, the DRIVE4COPD 300, Patrick stated 15th and finished 35th after being caught up in a 12-car crash.[74] In the season's third race, the Sam's Town 300 at Las Vegas Motor Speedway, she finished 36th after colliding with Michael McDowell on the 82nd lap.[75] Although Patrick struggled during her rookie season,[76] she had her best finish of the year at the season-ending Ford 300 at Homestead-Miami Speedway where she came 19th.[77] She finished 43rd in the drivers' standings, with 1,032 points in 13 starts.[78] In September, Patrick entered the K&N Pro Series East race at Dover International Speedway to broaden her stock car racing experience.[76] She finished sixth after briefly leading the race.[79]

Patrick remained at JR Motorsports for the 2011 Nationwide Series, and ran a part-time schedule that consisted of twelve races.[80] She finished 14th and 12th at the season's opening two races of the season at Daytona and Phoenix International Speedway.[81] Patrick became the highest-finishing woman in top-level NASCAR history Las Vegas when she surpassed Sara Christian's 62-year record to place fourth in the Sam's Town 300 race at Las Vegas (the highest in her Nationwide Series career).[82] She took her third top-ten finish of the season when she came tenth in the Subway Jalapeño 250 at Daytona after leading a total of 13 laps before being involved in an multi-car incident coming to the checkered flag on the last lap of the race.[83] Patrick's best performance throughout the remainder of the season was an eleventh-place finish at Texas Motor Speedway; she came 26th in points, with 321 accrued.[81]

2012-2014 (Switch to the Sprint Cup Series)

Patrick driving for JR Motorsports at the 2012 Sargento 200.

In 2012, Patrick raced full-time in the Nationwide Series for JR Motorsports and began competing a limited schedule with ten races in the Sprint Cup Series with Stewart-Haas Racing in an alliance with Tommy Baldwin Racing (TBR) in the No. 10 Chevrolet Impala.[d][85] She was guaranteed a spot at the Daytona 500 because TBR moved its top-35 owner points from the No. 36 driven by Dave Blaney to the new No. 10.[86] Patrick began her season by qualifying on the pole for the DRIVE4COPD 300, making her the second woman to achieve this feat in top-level NASCAR since Shawna Robinson in 1994.[87] Her participation in the Daytona 500 was over after one lap when she was involved in a four-car accident, finishing 38th, 74 laps behind race winner Matt Kenseth.[88] Patrick closed off her first full-time Nationwide Series season with four top-ten finishes and placed tenth in the final points standings.[89] Her season's best result was at Texas Motor Speedway where she came eighth. Patrick's best road course finish in NASCAR career came at Circuit Gilles Villeneuve, coming ninth and led a season-high twenty laps.[76]

Patrick was invited by team owner Tony Stewart to compete in the fund-raising Prelude to the Dream dirt track race at Eldora Speedway in June, finishing three laps down in 15th place after hitting the wall and being off the pace.[90][91] In her fourth Cup start, the Irwin Tools Night Race at Bristol Motor Speedway, she was running strong before she crashed on lap 436 from contact with Regan Smith, which became her first did not finish (DNF) in the series.[92] Patrick had her first lead lap finish at AAA Texas 500 at Texas Motor Speedway, finishing 24th, the last car on the same lap as the leaders.[93] Her final race of the season at Phoenix was embroiled by controversy as her car leaked oil and NASCAR elected not to wave the caution flags, causing an accident between Kurt Busch and Ryan Newman. This decision came under criticism from drivers and team owners.[94] With no top-tens, two DNF's, and an average finish of 28.3 in her ten starts; Patrick was not classified in the final standings since she did not contest the full championship, and thus, was illegible to score points.[95]

Patrick during practice for the 2013 NRA 500.

In the 2013 season, Patrick returned to Stewart-Haas Racing to contest her first full season in the Sprint Cup Series.[96] She was assigned teammate Ryan Newman's former crew chief Tony Gibson and his pit crew.[97] Patrick became the first woman to clinch the pole position for the Daytona 500, and thus, became the first female to achieve the feat in the Sprint Cup Series.[98] She ran strongly in the top ten for most of the race, but fell back from third place in the final three laps to finish eighth, and became the highest placing woman driver in the history of the Daytona 500.[99] In the May exhibition Sprint Showdown at Charlotte Motor Speedway, Patrick finished ninth and advanced to the Sprint All-Star Race by virtue of a fan vote. She started from the 22nd position and finished two spots higher than that.[100]

Patrick struggled after the season opener, failing to finish in the top-fifteen throughout the next 28 races over the next seven months.[101] In 36 races, she had one top-ten, an average finish of 26.1, five DNF's, and was 27th in the standings with 646 points.[102] She was second in the Rookie of the Year standings after a season-long battle with Ricky Stenhouse Jr.[103] In the Nationwide Series, Patrick drove the season-opening DRIVE4COPD 300 and the first of two races at Talladega Superspeedway, the Aaron's 312, in the No. 34 Turner Scott Motorsports car. She finished thirty-sixth and thirty-ninth after an respective engine failure and crash.[104]

Patrick waiting to practice at Las Vegas Motor Speedway at the 2014 Kobalt 400.

Patrick remained with Stewart-Haas Racing for the 2014 Sprint Cup Series.[105] As she won the pole for the 2013 Daytona 500, she was eligible for the Sprint Unlimited,[106] finishing sixteenth after getting involved in a multi-car accident.[107] Patrick started twenty-seventh for the Daytona 500, and led briefly during the pit stop cycle, before she was clipped by Aric Almirola, sending her car into a wall that lacked a SAFER barrier; she finished 40th.[108] She set three records during the season: the first came at the Aaron's 499 where she was the first female to lead at the track, and her finishing position of 22nd was the best for any woman at the circuit.[109] Patrick had the best qualifying performance for any woman at a non-restrictor plate track when she put her car fourth on the grid for the Coca-Cola 600.[110]

She clinched her best finish in the Sprint Cup Series with a sixth at the Oral-B USA 500 at Atlanta Motor Speedway, making her the second woman to take a top ten at the circuit; it beat the record of Janet Guthrie's tenth-place finish in 1978.[111] She was assigned teammate Kurt Busch's crew chief Daniel Knost and his pit crew for the season's final three races, and was later appointed her full-time crew chief for 2015.[112] At the season's end, Patrick finished 28th in points, one position down from the previous year, although she finished with 89 more points than her rookie season. She also had an average finish of 23.7, 2.4 positions better than her rookie year, with three top-tens, and four DNF's.[113] Early in the season, Patrick again drove for Turner Scott Motorsports in its No. 34 car at the season-opening DRIVE4COPD 300, starting third and finishing 19th.[114]

2015-2017 (Final years in NASCAR)

Patrick racing at New Hampshire Motor Speedway in 2015.

For 2015, Patrick again stayed with Stewart-Haas Racing.[115] She began her season in the Sprint Unlimited by finishing tenth after escaping with collateral damage from a multi-car accident.[116] Patrick started at the back of the field for the season-opening Daytona 500, and finished 21st.[117] After scoring two top-tens (seventh at the STP 500 at Martinsville Speedway and ninth at the Food City 500 at Bristol Motor Speedway), she eclipsed Janet Guthrie for the most top tens by a woman in Sprint Cup Series history.[118] Patrick led two laps of the Quicken Loans 400 at Michigan International Speedway during the pit stop cycle, and finished 16th,[119] and at the Quaker State 400, she became the first woman to start a hundred Cup Series races by qualifying for the race.[120] At the Fall Martinsville race, she had twenty-five owner and drivers points deducted, fined $50,000, and was put on probation by NASCAR until the end of 2015 due to David Gilliland hitting her and Patrick retaliating.[121] In 36 races, Patrick scored 716 points, placing her 24th in the drivers' standings, the highest of her career. She had two top-ten finishes, an average finish of 23.5, and failed to finish four times.[122]

On August 18, Stewart-Haas Racing announced in a press conference that Patrick had signed a multi-year contract which allowed her to stay with the team for 2016.[123] She also switched crew chiefs from Daniel Knost to Billy Scott for the upcoming season.[124] At the first race of the season, the Daytona 500, she retired when she made contact with Greg Biffle on the 184th lap, spun into some grass, and heavily damaged her car's front end.[125] Patrick was fined $20,000 for gesturing to Kasey Kahne after he wrecked her at the Auto Club 400.[126] She was involved in a high-speed crash with Matt Kenseth at Talladega which necessitated an x-ray for her chest.[127] Patrick struggled with form during the season, but did improve her average result for the fifth consecutive year to a career-high 22.0 in thirty-six starts. Her best result of the season was eleventh place at the fall Charlotte race, and led a career-high 30 laps.[124] Patrick was again 24th in the final drivers' standings but had less than points than the previous season, at 689 accrued, and did not finish three races she entered.[128]

Patrick remained with Stewart-Haas Racing for the duration of the renamed Monster Energy NASCAR Cup Series in 2017.[123] She began her campaign with her best finish in any NASCAR Cup Series race with a fourth place at the Advance Auto Parts Clash exhibition race at Daytona.[129] Patrick was credited with a 33rd-place finish for the season-opening Daytona 500 after she was forced into retirement from being caught up in a multi-car accident.[130] She later took her first top-ten finish in seventy-seven races when she placed tenth at Dover on June 4.[131] On November 17, Patrick announced that she would step away from full-time racing after the season finale at Homestead-Miami, though she also announced plans to compete in the 2018 Daytona 500 and 2018 Indianapolis 500.[132] She retired halfway through when her right-rear tire blew after glancing the wall and then collided heavily with another barrier.[133] Patrick finished the 2017 season with one top-ten, eleven DNF's, and an average finish of 23.8. She scored 511 points, putting her twenty-eighth in the drivers' standings.[134]

Formula One speculations

Patrick was scheduled to test for Formula One team Honda in November 2008,[135] but this was called off due to the Honda team pulling out of the sport.[136] In late 2009, the American Formula One team US F1 allegedly considered testing Patrick for a potential drive in 2010.[137] However, she stated that she was not contacted by anyone from the team, and that she had no plans to leave the IndyCar Series for Formula One at the time.[138] After the announcement of the return of Formula One to the United States in 2012, Formula One executive Bernie Ecclestone said that "to have someone like Danica Patrick in F1 would be a perfect advert."[139] However, in 2015, Patrick asserted that she had no desire to move into Formula One, due to her being too old to switch racing series; she stated that she felt more comfortable being around her family and friends in NASCAR.[140]

Public image and impact

In an 2017 article for The Guardian, Andrew Lawrence described Patrick as "an anti-Mulan" who infiltrated and thrived in an exclusively male environment while accentuating every part of her womanhood. He also said she is "an instrument of male and female fantasy, the sports pinup who grinds harder for feminism, day-to-day, than the great Billie Jean King ever could."[141] Henry Hutton of the Independent Tribune.noted that when Patrick entered IndyCar in 2005, she rapidly became a pop culture icon largely due to her gender and modelling, and her driver profile depreciated by being affected with car problems, getting involved in accidents, and uncompetitiveness.[142] She is known for being outspoken, and for having a quick-tempered but self-depreciating personality.[143] Nevertheless, Patrick is considered to be one of the most globally recognizable sports athletes, and is often identified solely by a singular name.[144] She has a strong fan base, and has been voted the IndyCar Series Most Popular Driver from 2005 to 2010, and the NASCAR Nationwide Series Most Popular Driver in 2012.[23] Patrick was voted the "Favorite Female Athlete" at the Kids Choice Award in 2008, 2012 and 2013.[145]

Patrick has also featured in various power and popularity listings. She was ranked the 50th and 88th most powerful person in the world of sports by Bloomberg Businessweek in 2008 and 2010, respectively.[146][147]Time magazine named Patrick as a candidate of the 100 most influential people in the world in 2009 and 2010.[148][149] She has been regularly ranked high up the Davie-Brown Index listings for several years,[3][150] and peaked at number eight amongst all female athletes in 2010.[151] Patrick came first in the Harris Poll's favorite female athletes in 2008; she placed second behind tennis player Serena Williams in 2007, and again from 2013 to 2015.[152] Between 2007 and 2013, she appeared on Forbes' annual list of the 100 highest paid celebrities four times, ranking amongst the bottom twenty-five each time.[153] Patrick has been attributed by scholars and the press for increasing attendance figures at auto racing events and television ratings. She has also been influential in helping more people become interested in motorsports. Some have credited her for preventing the dissolution of the IndyCar Series, and for strengthening support for NASCAR.[151]

She has come under constant scrutiny from the media and fans throughout her career.[e][142] Patrick has been compared to former tennis player Anna Kournikova for her lack of on track success and for her apparent tendency to be promoted by looks by several critics, but some of the similarities made between the two have been disputed by others.[154] Prior to her 2008 Indy Japan 300 triumph, she was criticized by some commentators and fans who claimed her low body weight (around 100 pounds (45 kg)) constituted an unfair advantage.[155][156] However, Indy Racing League president Brian Barnhart later said Patrick's weight "had a virtually minimal effect on the competition."[155] In June 2013, former NASCAR driver Kyle Petty called Patrick a "marketing machine" and asserted that she was not a race car driver.[157] In February 2014, during an appearance at the eighth annual Canadian Motorsports Expo, Kyle's father, Richard Petty, also criticized Patrick for not winning races outright often enough.[158]

Patrick has made several appearances on the cover of various magazines, such as FHM and Sports Illustrated, and ranks high in several beauty listings of female athletes.[3] She was named one of the most beautiful people in the world by People magazine in 2006.[159] The following year, Patrick was voted the sexiest athlete in the Victoria's Secret "What is Sexy" list.[160] She also was voted No. 42 in 2006 and No. 85 in 2007 in FHM's 100 sexiest women in the world.[161][162] In an interview with Fox News in 2012, Patrick spoke of her objection of being labelled a "sex symbol": "People don't know how to describe women in a pretty way. Do you call Blake Griffin a sex symbol because he was on the cover of Men's Health with his shirt off? People just don't know what to call women who look attractive."[163] She changed her view five years later, saying she felt "awesome" about her status as a sex symbol: "The exposure that was generated because of being female and using my attributes - it works."[164]

Media appearances

Patrick in 2010

Patrick has hosted several TV shows on Spike, including "Powerblock", and she was featured in the 2005 documentary Girl Racers.[165] She drove a Pagani Zonda Roadster around the streets of Monaco in the music video of Jay-Z's song "Show Me What You Got" in 2006.[166] That year, she published her autobiography, Danica: Crossing the Line.[167] On April 24, 2008, Patrick was a guest on the Late Show with David Letterman after winning her first IndyCar race.[168] During testing at Phoenix International Raceway, GoDaddy.com filmed a commercial with her that aired nationally. At the same test, at GoDaddy's invitation, Patrick met with Paul Teutul Sr., and Mikey Teutul, and subsequently appeared on an episode of American Chopper. She was also in a 2008 "inspirational, feel-good" GoDaddy commercial called "Kart" that features a young girl who aspires to be like Patrick.[169] On February 1, 2009, Patrick appeared in two GoDaddy commercials advertised during Super Bowl XLIII. The Most Watched Super Bowl commercial of 2009, according to TiVo, was Patrick's "Enhancement" ad for GoDaddy.com.[170]

Patrick made her acting debut in the February 10, 2010, episode of CSI: NY where she played a race car driver suspected of murder.[171] She also voiced herself in a cameo role in The Simpsons episode "How Munched Is That Birdie in the Window?".[172] Patrick appeared as a playable guest character in the video game Sonic & All-Stars Racing Transformed, providing her own voice and in addition, she made an appearance in the game's commercial.[173][174] She also appeared in Archie Comics' Sonic Universe #45, which adapted some of the game storyline.[175] On February 21, 2015, Patrick was hired by Fox NASCAR as a booth analyst for Xfinity Series races. She commentated the race at Michigan.[176] Patrick also voices the race car character Rally in Nickelodeon's Blaze and the Monster Machines 2016 animated series.[177] In June 2017, she joined Fox's Cup driver-only broadcast of the Xfinity Series race at Pocono Raceway, working in the studio alongside Denny Hamlin.[178] A documentary entitled Danica which chronicles Patrick's professional and personal life premiered on November 8 on Epix.[179] Her second book, Pretty Intense, was released on December 26.[180]

Endorsements and philanthropy

Patrick is represented by IMG talent agency and Excel Sports Management.[11][181] She has appeared in advertising campaigns for Nationwide Insurance, Tissot, Chevrolet, Coca-Cola, Peak Antifreeze, William Rast, Hot Wheels, GoDaddy.com, Nature's Bakery and Lyft.[182] Patrick is passionate about health and fitness, integrating her passions into her work, partnering with Nature's Bakery,[183] to promote health-conscious lifestyles and teaming up with Williams Sonoma to campaign for No Kid Hungry.[184] She is the celebrity spokeswoman for DRIVE4COPD, an awareness campaign for chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, from which her grandmother died.[185] Patrick also owns her own brand of wine, called Somnium, which means "dream" in Latin,[186] and her own athleisure collection, called "Warrior by Danica Patrick".[187] In 2014, she joined The Players' Tribune as a featured writer, having been immediately attracted to founder Derek Jeter's concept of allowing athletes to write and control their own content.[188]

Personal life

In 2005, Patrick married physical therapist Paul Edward Hospenthal, whom she met at his office in 2002 where she was recovering from a hip injury she sustained during a yoga session.[189][190] They divorced in 2013.[191] From November 2012 to December 2017, Patrick was in a relationship with fellow driver Ricky Stenhouse Jr..[192]

Motorsports career results

Career summary

Season Series Team Car No. Races Wins Poles FLaps Points Position
1998 Formula Vauxhall Winter Series
1999 British Formula Vauxhall Championship 31 9th
2000 British Formula Ford Championship United Kingdom Andy Welch Racing 14 0 0 0 3 19th
Formula Ford Festival United Kingdom Haywood Racing 89 1 0 0 0 N/A 2nd
European Formula Ford Championship United Kingdom Haywood Racing
2001 British Formula Ford Championship United Kingdom Haywood Racing 0 0 0 10 25th
2002 Barber Dodge Pro Series United States Team Rahal 89 5 0 0 0 35 13th
2003 American Le Mans Series GTS class United Kingdom Veloqx Prodrive Racing 80 1 0 0 0 10 23rd
Toyota Atlantic Championship United States Team Rahal 24 12 0 0 0 109 6th
2004 Toyota Atlantic Championship United States Team Rahal 24 12 0 1 1 269 3rd
2005 IndyCar Series United States Rahal Letterman 16 17 0 3 1 325 12th
2006 IndyCar Series United States Rahal Letterman 16 13 0 0 0 302 9th
Rolex Sports Car Series (24 Hours of Daytona) DP class United States Howard-Boss Motorsports 2 1 0 0 0 7 106th
2007 IndyCar Series United States Andretti Green Racing 7 17 0 0 1 424 7th
2008 IndyCar Series United States Andretti Green Racing 7 18 1 0 0 379 6th
2009 IndyCar Series United States Andretti Green Racing 7 17 0 0 0 393 5th
Rolex Sports Car Series (24 Hours of Daytona) DP class United States Childress-Howard Motorsports 2 1 0 0 0 23 43rd
2010 IndyCar Series United States Andretti Autosport 7 17 0 0 0 367 10th
NASCAR Nationwide Series United States JR Motorsports 7 13 0 0 0 1032 43rd
NASCAR K&N Pro Series East United States JR Motorsports 83 1 0 0 0 155 45th
ARCA Racing Series United States Bob Schacht Motorsport 7 1 0 0 0 200 85th
2011 IndyCar Series United States Andretti Autosport 7 17* 0 0 0 314 10th
NASCAR Nationwide Series United States JR Motorsports 7 12 0 0 0 321 26th
2012 NASCAR Nationwide Series United States JR Motorsports 7 33 0 1 0 838 10th
NASCAR Sprint Cup Series United States Stewart-Haas Racing 10 10 0 0 0 0 62nd
2013 NASCAR Sprint Cup Series United States Stewart-Haas Racing 10 36 0 1 0 646 27th
NASCAR Nationwide Series United States Turner Scott Motorsports 34 2 0 0 0 0 128th
2014 NASCAR Sprint Cup Series United States Stewart-Haas Racing 10 36 0 0 0 735 28th
NASCAR Nationwide Series United States Turner Scott Motorsports 30 1 0 0 0 0 108th
2015 NASCAR Sprint Cup Series United States Stewart-Haas Racing 10 36 0 0 0 716 24th
2016 NASCAR Sprint Cup Series United States Stewart-Haas Racing 10 36 0 0 0 689 24th
2017 Monster Energy NASCAR Cup Series United States Stewart-Haas Racing 10 36 0 0 0 511 28th
Source:[193]
* IndyCar Series Race 18 was abandoned due to the death of Dan Wheldon after 13 laps.
** Season still in progress

American open-wheel racing

(key) (Races in bold indicate pole position) (Races in italics indicate fastest lap)

Barber Dodge Pro Series

Barber Pro Series results
Year 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 Rank Points Ref
2002 SEB LIM LAG POR TOR
7
CLE
7
VAN
4
MDO
11
ROA MTL
22
13th 35 [194]

Toyota Atlantic Championship

Toyota Atlantic results
Year Team 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 Rank Points Ref
2003 Team Rahal MTY
3
LBH
14
MIL
6
LS
13
POR
6
CLE
5
TOR
10
TRR
5
MDO
10
MTL
7
DEN
5
MIA
2
6th 109 [195]
2004 LBH
5
MTY
3
MIL
4
POR1
2
POR2
7
CLE
3
TOR
4
VAN
4
ROA
4
DEN
5
MTL
4
LS
8
3rd 269 [195]
Years Teams Races Poles Wins Podiums
(Non-win)**
Top 10s
(Non-podium)***
Championships Ref
2 1 24 1 0 5 17 0 [195]
** Podium (Non-win) indicates 2nd or 3rd place finishes.
*** Top 10s (Non-podium) indicates 4th through 10th place finishes.

IndyCar Series

IndyCar Series results
Year Team Chassis Engine 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 Rank Points Ref
2005 Rahal Letterman Racing Panoz Honda HMS
15
PHX
15
STP
12
MOT
4
INDY
4
TXS
13
RIR
10
KAN
9
NSH
7
MIL
19
MIS
20
KTY
16
PPIR
8
SNM
20
CHI
6
WGL
16
FON
18
12th 325 [32]
2006 HMS1
DNS
STP
6
MOT
8
INDY
8
WGL
8
SNM
8
9th 302 [36]
Dallara TXS
12
RIR
15
KAN
11
NSH
4
MIL
4
MIS
17
KTY
8
CHI
12
2007 Andretti Green Racing HMS
14
STP
8
MOT
11
KAN
7
INDY
8
MIL
8
TXS
3
IOW
13
RIR
6
WGL
11
NSH
3
MDO
5
MIS
7
KTY
16
SNM
6
DET
2
CHI
11
7th 424 [39]
2008 HMS
6
STP
10
MOT2
1
LBH2 KAN
19
INDY
22
MIL
9
TXS
10
IOW
6
RIR
6
WGL
14
NSH
5
MDO
12
EDM
18
KTY
11
SNM
5
DET
16
CHI
10
SRF3
18
6th 379 [45]
2009 STP
19
LBH
4
KAN
5
INDY
3
MIL
5
TXS
6
IOW
9
RIR
5
WGL
11
TOR
6
EDM
11
KTY
8
MDO
19
SNM
16
CHI
12
MOT
6
HMS
19
5th 393 [55]
2010 Andretti Autosport SAO
15
STP
7
ALA
19
LBH
16
KAN
11
INDY
6
TXS
2
IOW
10
WGL
20
TOR
6
EDM
15
MDO
21
SNM
16
CHI
14
KTY
9
MOT
5
HMS
2
10th 367 [196]
2011 STP
12
ALA
17
LBH
7
SAO
23
INDY
10
TXS
16
TXS
8
MIL
5
IOW
10
TOR
19
EDM
9
MDO
21
NHM
6
SNM
21
BAL
6
MOT
11
KTY
10
LVS4
C
10th 314 [68]
1 Rahal-Letterman Racing withdrew both Patrick and Buddy Rice from competition when their teammate Paul Dana was killed in a race-morning practice session accident.
2 Because of Reunification prior to the start of the 2008 IRL season, a compromise was established where teams were permitted to run either the Indy Japan 300 on April 20 with the IRL formula and rules or the Long Beach Grand Prix the same day with the old Champ Car formula and rules. Both races were for full IRL points.
3 Non-points race
4 The Las Vegas Indy 300 was abandoned after Dan Wheldon died from injuries sustained in a 15-car crash on lap 11.
Years Teams Races Poles Wins Podiums
(Non-win)**
Top 10s
(Non-podium)***
Indianapolis 500
Wins
Championships
7 2 114 3 1 6 63 0 0
** Podium (Non-win) indicates 2nd or 3rd place finishes.
*** Top 10s (Non-podium) indicates 4th through 10th place finishes.

Indianapolis 500

Sports car racing

American Le Mans Series

American Le Mans Series results
Year Entrant Class Chassis Engine Tyres 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 Rank Points Ref
2003 Veloqx Prodrive Racing GTS Ferrari 550-GTS Maranello Ferrari 5.9L V12 M SEB ATL
ovr:10
cls:4
SON TRO MOS AME MON MIA PET 23rd 10 [197]

Grand-Am Rolex Sports Car Series

(key) (Races in bold indicate pole position, Results are overall/class)

Rolex Sports Car Series results
Year Team Make Engine Class 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 Rank Points Ref
2006 Howard-Boss Motorsports Crawford DP03 Pontiac DP DAY
50/24
MEX HOM LBH VIR LAG PHX LRP WAT1 DAY2 BAR WAT2 INF MIL 106th 7 [197]
2009 Childress-Howard Motorsports Crawford DP08 Pontiac DP DAY
8/8
VIR NJ LAG WAT MDO DAY2 BAR WAT2 CGV MIL HOM 43rd 23 [197]

24 Hours of Daytona

24 Hours of Daytona results
Year Class No. Team Car Co-drivers Laps Position Class Pos.
2006 DP 2 United States Howard-Boss Motorsports Pontiac Crawford DP03 Netherlands Jan Lammers
United Kingdom Allan McNish
United States Rusty Wallace
273 50 DNF 24 DNF
2009 DP 2 United States Childress-Howard Motorsports Pontiac Crawford DP08 United Kingdom Andy Wallace
United States Rob Finlay
United States Casey Mears
702 8 8
Source:[197]

NASCAR

(key) (Bold - Pole position awarded by qualifying time. Italics - Pole position earned by points standings or practice time. * - Most laps led.)

Monster Energy Cup Series

Monster Energy NASCAR Cup Series results
Year Team No. Make 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 32 33 34 35 36 MENCC Pts Ref
2012 Stewart-Haas Racing 10 Chevy DAY
38
PHO LVS BRI CAL MAR TEX KAN RCH TAL DAR
31
CLT
30
DOV POC MCH SON KEN DAY NHA IND POC GLN MCH BRI
29
ATL
29
RCH CHI
25
NHA DOV
28
TAL CLT KAN
32
MAR TEX
24
PHO
17
HOM 62nd 01 [95]
2013 DAY
8
PHO
39
LVS
33
BRI
28
CAL
26
MAR
12
TEX
28
KAN
25
RCH
29
TAL
33
DAR
28
CLT
29
DOV
24
POC
29
MCH
13
SON
29
KEN
23
DAY
13
NHA
37
IND
30
POC
35
GLN
20
MCH
23
BRI
26
ATL
21
RCH
30
CHI
20
NHA
27
DOV
29
KAN
43
CLT
20
TAL
33
MAR
17
TEX
25
PHO
33
HOM
20
27th 646 [102]
2014 DAY
40
PHO
36
LVS
21
BRI
18
CAL
14
MAR
32
TEX
27
DAR
22
RCH
34
TAL
22
KAN
7
CLT
39
DOV
23
POC
37
MCH
17
SON
18
KEN
21
DAY
8
NHA
22
IND
42
POC
30
GLN
21
MCH
18
BRI
27
ATL
6
RCH
16
CHI
19
NHA
19
DOV
25
KAN
16
CLT
26
TAL
19
MAR
34
TEX
36
PHO
22
HOM
18
28th 735 [113]
2015 DAY
21
ATL
16
LVS
27
PHO
26
CAL
19
MAR
7
TEX
16
BRI
9
RCH
25
TAL
21
KAN
27
CLT
22
DOV
15
POC
37
MCH
16
SON
24
DAY
35
KEN
34
NHA
24
IND
27
POC
16
GLN
17
MCH
25
BRI
27
DAR
42
RCH
19
CHI
26
NHA
40
DOV
21
CLT
19
KAN
22
TAL
27
MAR
40
TEX
16
PHO
16
HOM
24
24th 716 [122]
2016 DAY
35
ATL
20
LVS
21
PHO
19
CAL
38
MAR
16
TEX
21
BRI
27
RCH
24
TAL
24
KAN
20
DOV
13
CLT
21
POC
32
MCH
21
SON
19
DAY
27
KEN
17
NHA
14
IND
22
POC
22
GLN
21
BRI
22
MCH
23
DAR
24
RCH
15
CHI
24
NHA
18
DOV
28
CLT
11
KAN
18
TAL
20
MAR
24
TEX
24
PHO
29
HOM
19
24th 689 [128]
2017 Ford DAY
33
ATL
17
LVS
36
PHO
22
CAL
26
MAR
23
TEX
24
BRI
36
RCH
18
TAL
38
KAN
36
CLT
25
DOV
10
POC
16
MCH
37
SON
17
DAY
25
KEN
15
NHA
13
IND
11
POC
15
GLN
22
MCH
22
BRI
25
DAR
26
RCH
23
CHI
18
NHA
18
DOV
18
CLT
38
TAL
21
KAN
38
MAR
17
TEX
17
PHO
25
HOM
37
28th 511 [134]
Daytona 500
Year Team Manufacturer Start Finish
2012 Stewart-Haas Racing Chevrolet 29 38
2013 1 8
2014 27 40
2015 20 21
2016 16 35
2017 Ford 12 33

Nationwide Series

NASCAR Nationwide Series results
Year Team No. Make 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 32 33 34 35 NNSC Pts Ref
2010 JR Motorsports 7 Chevy DAY
35
CAL
31
LVS
36
BRI NSH PHO TEX TAL RCH DAR DOV CLT NSH KEN ROA NHA
30
DAY CHI
24
GTY IRP IOW GLN MCH
27
BRI CGV ATL RCH DOV
35
KAN CAL
30
CLT
21
GTY
22
TEX
22
PHO
32
HOM
19
43rd 1032 [78]
2011 DAY
14
PHO
17
LVS
4
BRI
33
CAL TEX TAL NSH RCH DAR DOV IOW CLT CHI
10
MCH ROA DAY
10
KEN NHA NSH IRP IOW GLN CGV
24
BRI ATL RCH
18
CHI DOV KAN
15
CLT TEX
11
PHO
21
HOM
32
26th 321 [81]
2012 DAY
38
PHO
21
LVS
12
BRI
19
CAL
35
TEX
8
RCH
21
TAL
13
DAR
12
IOW
30
CLT
13
DOV
30
MCH
18
ROA
12
KEN
12
DAY
31
NHA
14
CHI
14
IND
35
IOW
11
GLN
43
CGV
27
BRI
9
ATL
13
RCH
29
CHI
12
KEN
14
DOV
16
CLT
11
KAN
10
TEX
14
PHO
10
HOM
13
10th 838 [89]
2013 Turner Scott Motorsports 34 Chevy DAY
36
PHO LVS BRI CAL TEX RCH TAL
39
DAR CLT DOV IOW MCH ROA KEN DAY NHA CHI IND IOW GLN MOH BRI ATL RCH CHI KEN DOV KAN CLT TEX PHO HOM 128th 01 [104]
2014 30 DAY
19
PHO LVS BRI CAL TEX DAR RCH TAL IOW CLT DOV MCH ROA KEN DAY NHA CHI IND IOW GLN MOH BRI ATL RCH CHI KEN DOV KAN CLT TEX PHO HOM 108th 01 [198]

K&N Pro Series East

NASCAR K&N Pro Series East results
Year Team No. Make 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 NKNPSEC Pts Ref
2010 JR Motorsports 83 Chevy GRE SBO IOW MAR NHA LRP LEE GRE NHA DOV
6
45th 155 [199]

* Season still in progress
1 Ineligible for series points

ARCA Racing Series

(key) (Bold - Pole position awarded by qualifying time. Italics - Pole position earned by points standings or practice time. * - Most laps led.)

ARCA Racing Series results
Year Team No. Make 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 ARSC Pts Ref
2010 JR Motorsports 7 Chevy DAY
6
PBE SLM TEX TAL TOL POC MCH IOW MFD POC BLN NJE ISF CHI DSF TOL SLM KAN CAR 85th 200 [200]

See also

Notes and references

Notes

  1. ^ Brooke later became dissatisfied with go-karting after crashing several times and stopped.[7]
  2. ^ Patrick won a career-high 39 out of 49 kart races in 1996.[8]
  3. ^ From 2012 to 2014, Patrick's re-numbered No. 27 car was driven by 2011 Rookie of the Year James Hinchcliffe.[70]
  4. ^ The owner of the No. 7 Robby Gordon did not wish to hand the number to Patrick because to him building his operation around it.[84]
  5. ^ Auto racing enthusiasts have termed the phrase "Danicamania" for the heavy press coverage Patrick has received.[11]

References

  1. ^ a b R. Nelson, Murry (May 23, 2013). American Sports: A History of Icons, Idols and Ideas. Santa Barbara, California: ABC-CLIO. p. 1011. ISBN 0-313-39753-8. Archived from the original on January 4, 2018. Retrieved 2018. 
  2. ^ a b J. Fendell, Robert. "Danica Patrick: American Race Car Driver". Encyclopædia Britannica. Archived from the original on June 25, 2016. Retrieved 2018. 
  3. ^ a b c d e J. Boyer, Peter (May 31, 2010). "Changing Lanes - Can Danica Patrick bridge the chasm between IndyCar and NASCAR?". The New Yorker. Archived from the original on January 4, 2018. Retrieved 2018. 
  4. ^ "Danica Patrick ancestry". Ancestry.com. Archived from the original on October 25, 2012. Retrieved 2012. 
  5. ^ a b c d e f g Sirvaitis, Karen (1 July 2010). Danica Patrick: Racing's Trailblazer. Twenty-First Century Books. pp. 12-34. ISBN 978-0-7613-6368-2. Archived from the original on January 3, 2018. Retrieved 2018. 
  6. ^ a b c d e Cavin, Curt (January 22, 2002). "A Tough 110 Pounds: Soon the world might know who exactly who Danica Patrick is". Autoweek. Archived from the original on January 2, 2018. Retrieved 2018. 
  7. ^ a b c d James, Brant (October 17, 2012). "To Brooke Patrick, sister Danica's fame is surreal". ESPNW. Archived from the original on October 12, 2017. Retrieved 2018. 
  8. ^ a b c d Goodman, Doug (May 23, 2008). "Patrick: 'Roscoe will always be home for me'". Rockford Register Star. Archived from the original on January 6, 2018. Retrieved 2018. 
  9. ^ "Patrick, IMS Radio Network Reporter Share Hometown Roots". Indy500.com. May 25, 2005. Archived from the original on September 27, 2007. Retrieved 2008. 
  10. ^ a b c Roberts, MB (February 8, 2014). "Danica Patrick: From Go-Kart Racer to NASCAR Contender". American Profile. Archived from the original on September 8, 2015. Retrieved 2018. 
  11. ^ a b c Medley, Michelle (August 2, 2009). "Danica Patrick is Pushing the Limits". Success. Archived from the original on May 13, 2015. Retrieved 2018. 
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Further reading

External links


  This article uses material from the Wikipedia page available here. It is released under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share-Alike License 3.0.

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