Groups of Traditional Buildings
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Groups of Traditional Buildings

Groups of Traditional Buildings (?, Dent?teki Kenz?butsu-gun) is a Japanese category of historic preservation introduced by a 1975 amendment of the law which mandates the protection of groups of traditional buildings which, together with their environment, form a beautiful scene. They can be post towns, castle towns, mining towns, merchant quarters, ports, farming or fishing villages, etc.[1] The Japanese government's Agency for Cultural Affairs recognizes and protects the country's cultural properties under the Law for the Protection of Cultural Properties.

Municipalities can designate items of particular importance as Preservation Districts for Groups of Traditional Buildings (, Dent?teki Kenz?butsu-gun Hozon-chiku) and approve measures to protect them. Items of even higher importance are then designated Important Preservation Districts for Groups of Traditional Buildings (?, J?y? Dent?teki Kenz?butsu-gun Hozon-chiku) by the central government.[1] The Agency for Cultural Affairs then provides guidance, advice, and funds for repairs and other work. Additional support is given in the form of preferential tax treatment.

As of November 28, 2017, 117 districts have been classified as Important Preservation Districts for Groups of Traditional Buildings.

List of Important Preservation Districts

Criteria

Important Preservation Districts for Groups of Traditional Buildings are designated according to three criteria:[2]

  1. Groups of traditional buildings that show excellent design as a whole
  2. Groups of traditional buildings and land distribution that preserve the old state of affairs well
  3. Groups of traditional buildings and their surrounding environment that show remarkable regional characteristics

Statistics

Type Districts[note 1]
brewers town 2
casters town 1
castle town 4
dyeing and weaving town 2
farming village 5
fishing village 2
hot-spring town 1
jinaimachi[note 2] 2temple t
lacquerware town 1
merchant quarter 25
mining town 2
mountain village 15
porcelain-maker town 1
port quarter 13
post town 9
salt works town 1
sericulture community 5
ship-owner quarter 2
shrine quarter 1
tea house quarter 3
temple town 6
textile town 1
samurai quarter 13
wax maker quarter 1
zaig? town[note 3] 10

Usage

The table's columns (except for Remarks and Images) are sortable by table headings. The following gives an overview of what is included in the table and how the sorting works.

  • Name: name of the important preservation district as registered in the Database of National Cultural Properties[3]
  • Type: type of the district (samurai / merchant / tea house /... quarter, post town, mountain village, mine town,...)
  • Criteria: number of criterion under which the district is designated
  • Area: area covered
  • Remarks: general remarks
  • Location: "town-name prefecture-name"; The column entries sort as "prefecture-name town-name".
  • Images: picture of the structure

List

Name Type Criteria Area Remarks Location Images
Motomachi and Suehiro-ch? (, Hakodate-shi Motomachi Suehiro-ch?)[4][5] port quarter 3 14.5 ha
(36 acres)
Old Hakodate port area, which was among the first ports to be opened during the bakumatsu period at the end of the Tokugawa Shogunate. Due to a fire in the Meiji period, the district consists of a mix of western, Japanese, and eclectic style town houses, religious and community buildings from the Meiji to the early Sh?wa period. Hakodate, Hokkaid?
41°45?56.7?N 140°42?45.02?E / 41.765750°N 140.7125056°E / 41.765750; 140.7125056 (Hakodate, Motomachi and Suehiro-ch?)
Two joined red gabled brick houses with black roofs and entrances on the gable ends.
Nakach? (, Hirosaki-shi Nakamachi)[6] samurai quarter 2 10.6 ha
(26 acres)
Former samurai castle town of the Tsugaru Domain dating to the Keich? era (1596-1615) with principal houses, the front gate, sawara hedges and wooden fences. Hirosaki, Aomori
40°36?46.43?N 140°28?1.07?E / 40.6128972°N 140.4669639°E / 40.6128972; 140.4669639 (Hirosaki, Nakach?)
Hirosaki City Nakacho1.jpg
Nakamachi (, Kuroishi-shi Nakamachi)[7] merchant quarter 1 3.1 ha
(7.7 acres)
Merchant town and transportation center along the coastal road that prospered since the establishment of the Kuroishi Tsugaru family by Tsugaru Nobufusa in 1656. Kuroishi, Aomori
40°38?41.43?N 140°35?47.65?E / 40.6448417°N 140.5965694°E / 40.6448417; 140.5965694 (Kuroishi, Nakamachi)
Komise Kuroishi Aomori.jpg
J?nai Suwa-k?ji (?, Kanegasaki-ch? J?nai Suwa-k?ji)[8] samurai quarter 2 34.8 ha
(86 acres)
Samurai town at the order of the Date Domain established in strategic position on the Kitakami River with thatched houses and hedges. Kanegasaki, Iwate
39°11?48.32?N 141°7?19.36?E / 39.1967556°N 141.1220444°E / 39.1967556; 141.1220444 (Kanegasaki, J?nai Suwa-k?ji)
--
Murata (, Murata-machi Murata)[9] merchant quarter 1 7.4 ha
(18 acres)
Trading center in Sennan () dealing in safflower during the Edo and in cocoons starting from the Meiji period. Murata, Miyagi
38°7?7.22?N 140°43?30.67?E / 38.1186722°N 140.7251861°E / 38.1186722; 140.7251861 (Murata)
Kuranomatunami.jpg
Masuda (, Yokote-shi Masuda)[10][11] zaig? town[note 3] 2 10.6 ha
(26 acres)
Edo period town noted for its uchigura, storage and communitiy space that is incorporated into the building itself. Yokote, Akita
39°12?10.75?N 140°32?45.65?E / 39.2029861°N 140.5460139°E / 39.2029861; 140.5460139 (Yokote, Masuda)
Decorated black door to a black structure.
Kakunodate (, Senboku-shi Kakunodate)[12] samurai quarter 2 6.9 ha
(17 acres)
Large number of samurai residences, a front gate and wooden fences of a former castle town created by a branch of the Satake clan. Semboku, Akita
39°35?37.67?N 140°33?55.87?E / 39.5937972°N 140.5655194°E / 39.5937972; 140.5655194 (Senboku, Kakunodate)
A street lined by wooden plank fences and small wooden gates.
?uchi-juku (, Shimog?-machi ?uchi-juku)[13] post town 3 11.3 ha
(28 acres)
Part of the Aizu Nishi Kaid?. Consisting of about 450 m (1,480 ft) road lined by large equally spaced thatched wooden buildings. Shimog?, Fukushima
37°20?1.68?N 139°51?39.91?E / 37.3338000°N 139.8610861°E / 37.3338000; 139.8610861 (Shimog?, ?uchi-juku)
Street lined by similar wooden houses with white walls and thatched roofs.
Maezawa (, Minamiaizu-machi Maezawa)[14] mountain village 3 13.3 ha
(33 acres)
Village built from the late Meiji to the early Sh?wa period with thatched houses in the ch?mon style.[note 4] Minamiaizu, Fukushima
37°6?7.88?N 139°31?11.4?E / 37.1021889°N 139.519833°E / 37.1021889; 139.519833 (Minamiaizu, Maezawa)
Maezewa minamiaidu fukushima japan 01.jpg
Makabe (, Sakuragawa-shi Makabe)[16] zaig? town[note 3] 2 17.6 ha
(43 acres)
Town appeared around Makabe Castle in the Sengoku period and was further developed by the Kasama clan during the Edo period. Japanese and western style town houses from the Edo period from after a Tenp? era (1830-1844) fire remain. Plots are fenced in with a yakuimon[note 5] providing access and some town houses feature a sodegura[note 6]storehouse. Makabe, Sakuragawa, Ibaraki
36°16?38.03?N 140°6?6.86?E / 36.2772306°N 140.1019056°E / 36.2772306; 140.1019056 (Sakuragawa, Makabe)
A traditional Japanese style hotel in Makabe.
Kauemon-ch? (, Tochigi-shi Kauemon-ch?)[19] zaig? town[note 3] 2 9.6 ha
(24 acres)
Residential and storehouses from the end of the Edo period onward, that formed alongside the Nikk? Reiheishi Kaid?. Tochigi, Tochigi
36°23?14.85?N 139°44?3.84?E / 36.3874583°N 139.7344000°E / 36.3874583; 139.7344000 (Tochigi, Kauemon-ch?)
Kauemon-cho.JPG
Kiry? Shin Machi (?, Kiry?-shi Kiry? Shin Machi)[20] weaving town 2 13.4 ha
(33 acres)
Edo period rural market town with machiya and textile related storehouses laid out along a main street. Kiry?, Gunma
36°25?0.39?N 139°20?30.28?E / 36.4167750°N 139.3417444°E / 36.4167750; 139.3417444 (Kiry?, Kiry? Shin Machi)
Nokoyane.jpg
Akaiwa Kuni (, Nakanoj?-machi Kuni Akaiwa)[21][22] mountain village and sericulture community 3 63.0 ha
(156 acres)
Meiji era sericulture farming village noted for its two or three-storied buildings. Component of The Tomioka Silk Mill and Related Industrial Heritage. Nakanoj?, Gunma
36°34?30.8?N 138°37?41.34?E / 36.575222°N 138.6281500°E / 36.575222; 138.6281500 (Nakanoj?, Kuni Akaiwa)
Kuni-Akaiwa settlement02.JPG
Kawagoe (, Kawagoe-shi Kawagoe)[23] merchant quarter 1 7.8 ha
(19 acres)
Machiya and storehouses from after a great fire in 1893 and post Taish? period western style buildings. Kawagoe, Saitama
35°55?23.18?N 139°28?58.57?E / 35.9231056°N 139.4829361°E / 35.9231056; 139.4829361 (Kawagoe)
A black two-storied house with hip-and gable roof and a pent roof on the first storey.
Sawara (, Katori-shi Sawara)[24] merchant quarter 3 7.1 ha
(18 acres)
River port prospering from the Edo to the Taish? period with a variety of town houses, storehouses and western style architecture. Katori, Chiba
35°53?25.11?N 140°29?52.39?E / 35.8903083°N 140.4978861°E / 35.8903083; 140.4978861 (Katori, Sawara)
A small street and wooden houses next to a canal.
Shukunegi (, Sado-shi Shukunegi)[25] port quarter 3 28.5 ha
(70 acres)
Edo period boat builder and ship owner quarter of dense two-story houses that look plain from the outside with luxurious interior. Sado, Niigata
37°48?25.04?N 138°14?36.71?E / 37.8069556°N 138.2435306°E / 37.8069556; 138.2435306 (Sado, Shukunegi)
Sado Shukunegi.jpg
Kanaya-machi (, Takaoka-shi Kanaya-machi)[26] casters town 1 6.4 ha
(16 acres)
Town houses, storehouses and workshops of a metal caster community that formed around Takaoka Castle. Takaoka, Toyama
36°45?2.47?N 137°0?21.18?E / 36.7506861°N 137.0058833°E / 36.7506861; 137.0058833 (Takaoka, Kanaya-machi)
Street with traditional Japanese wooden houses
Yamach?-suji (, Takaoka-shi Yamach?-suji)[27] merchant quarter 1 5.5 ha
(14 acres)
Traditional buildings from the Meiji to the early Sh?wa period, such as: storehouses, town houses, western style buildings and rick structures. Takaoka, Toyama
36°44?49.49?N 137°0?39.22?E / 36.7470806°N 137.0108944°E / 36.7470806; 137.0108944 (Takaoka, Yamach?-suji)
An old bank office built in 1914.
Suganuma (, Nanto-shi Suganuma)[28] mountain village 3 4.4 ha
(11 acres)
Village with 9 gassh?-zukuri houses and itakura () store houses. Part of the World Heritage Site Historic Villages of Shirakawa-g? and Gokayama Nanto, Toyama
36°24?15.74?N 136°53?11.77?E / 36.4043722°N 136.8866028°E / 36.4043722; 136.8866028 (Nanto, Suganuma0)
A thatched wooden house with very steep gable covered by snow.
Ainokura (, Nanto-shi Ainokura)[29] mountain village 3 18 ha
(44 acres)
Village with 20 gassh?-zukuri houses and itakura () store houses. Part of the World Heritage Site Historic Villages of Shirakawa-g? and Gokayama Nanto, Toyama
36°25?34.35?N 136°56?8.78?E / 36.4262083°N 136.9357722°E / 36.4262083; 136.9357722 (Nanto, Ainokura)
Wooden thatched houses and rice field in a mountainous landscape.
Kaga-hashidate (?, Kaga-shi Kaga-hashidate)[30] ship-owner quarter 2 11 ha
(27 acres)
Residences of ship owners and boatsmen of kitamaebune ships which were active from about the late Edo to the mid Meiji perio. Kaga, Ishikawa
36°21?1.49?N 136°18?33.8?E / 36.3504139°N 136.309389°E / 36.3504139; 136.309389 (Kaga, Kaga Hashidate)
A large house beyond a wall.
Kaga-higashitani (?, Kaga-shi Kaga-higashitani)[31] mountain village 3 151.8 ha
(375 acres)
Four charcoal maker villages that prospered from early modern times to the early Sh?wa period. Kaga, Ishikawa
36°14?17.2?N 136°26?34.75?E / 36.238111°N 136.4429861°E / 36.238111; 136.4429861 (Kaga, Kaga Higashitani)
--
Utatsu-sanroku (?, Kanazawa-shi Utatsu-sanroku)[32] temple town 2 22.1 ha
(55 acres)
Neighborhood that developed along the approach roads (sand?) between the Hokkoku Kaid? and temples or shrines. Kanazawa, Ishikawa
36°34?28.1?N 136°40?9.71?E / 36.574472°N 136.6693639°E / 36.574472; 136.6693639 (Kanazawa, Utatsu-sanroku)
Kanazawa-shi Utatsu-sanroku, Ishikawa, temple district.JPG
Teramachi-dai (, Kanazawa-shi Tera-machi-dai)[33] temple town 2 22 ha
(54 acres)
Temple town formed in early modern times along the Noda and Tsurugi roads. My?ry?-ji, popularly known as Ninja-dera ("Ninja temples") is located here. Kanazawa, Ishikawa
36°33?7.44?N 136°39?0.96?E / 36.5520667°N 136.6502667°E / 36.5520667; 136.6502667 (Kanazawa, Teramachi-dai)
Temples along a street.
Kazue-machi (, Kanazawa-shi Kazue-machi)[34] tea house quarter 1 0.6 ha
(1.5 acres)
Tea house neighborhood that developed from the late Edo to the early Sh?wa period with tall two-storied houses to which in recent times a third level has been added. The site is said to have been the residence of a Kaga Domain deputy, giving the district its name. Kanazawa, Ishikawa
36°34?20.23?N 136°39?48.2?E / 36.5722861°N 136.663389°E / 36.5722861; 136.663389 (Kanazawa, Kazue-machi)
Houses along a riverfront.
Higashiyama-higashi (, Kanazawa-shi Higashiyama-higashi)[35] tea house quarter 1 1.8 ha
(4.4 acres)
Tea house neighborhood with tow-storied houses that was created in 1820 by moving buildings from central Kanazawa. Kanazawa, Ishikawa
36°34?21.64?N 136°40?1.33?E / 36.5726778°N 136.6670361°E / 36.5726778; 136.6670361 (Kanazawa, Higashiyama-higashi)
Small street lined by wooden two-storeyed houses.
Kuroshima district (?, Wajima-shi kuroshima-chiku)[36] ship-owner quarter 2 20.5 ha
(51 acres)
Early 16th century settlement that grew with the developeent of the shipping industry in the Sea of Japan during the Edo period. The district contains residences of ship-owners and sailors, temples, shrines, storehouses and gardens. Wajima, Ishikawa
37°16?53.96?N 136°44?4.39?E / 37.2816556°N 136.7345528°E / 37.2816556; 136.7345528 (Wajima, Kuroshima)
Wooden and black tile-roofed ship-owner houses.
Shiramine (, Hakusan-shi Shiramine)[37] sericulture community 3 10.7 ha
(26 acres)
Sericultrue village in a narrow valley location. Hakusan, Ishikawa
36°10?28.88?N 136°37?33.52?E / 36.1746889°N 136.6259778°E / 36.1746889; 136.6259778 (Hakusan, Shiramine)
Street with two-storied wooden houses.
Kumagawa-juku (, Wakasa-ch? Kumagawajuku)[38] post town 3 10.8 ha
(27 acres)
Located on the Saba Kaid?, which connected Wakasa Province with the capital in Kyoto. Wakasa, Fukui
35°26?36.85?N 135°54?5.33?E / 35.4435694°N 135.9014806°E / 35.4435694; 135.9014806 (Wakasa, Kumagawa)
Two-storeyed houses whose ground floor is occupied by shops next to small street and stream.
Obama-nishigumi (?, Obama-shi Obama-nishigumi)[39] merchant and tea house quarter 2 19.1 ha
(47 acres)
Merchant houses and tea houses in an old port town that served as a relay point for goods from the Japan Sea side to Kyoto. Obama, Fukui
35°29?32.05?N 135°44?13.69?E / 35.4922361°N 135.7371361°E / 35.4922361; 135.7371361 (Obama, Obama-nishigumi)
Obama nishigumi.JPG
Kamij? Shimo-odawara Enzan (, K?sh?-shi Enzan Shimo-odawara Kamij?)[40] mountain village and sericulture community 3 15.1 ha
(37 acres)
Dry field farming village during the Edo period that turned into silk farming in the mid Meiji period. To accommodate the silk worm culture, the central part of the roof was raised. K?sh?, Yamanashi
35°44?14.99?N 138°46?14.65?E / 35.7374972°N 138.7707361°E / 35.7374972; 138.7707361 (K?sh?, Kamij? Shimo-odawara Enzan)
Old silk-raising farmer houses with a unique shape roof.
Akazawa (, Hayakawa-ch? Akazawa)[41] mountain village, post town for pilgrims 3 25.6 ha
(63 acres)
Lodgings for pilgrims going to Kuon-ji, head temple of Nichiren-sh?. Located between Mount Shichimen and the temple's sacred mountain, Mount Minobu. Hayakawa, Yamanashi
35°23?50.74?N 138°22?39.08?E / 35.3974278°N 138.3775222°E / 35.3974278; 138.3775222 (Hayakawa, Akazawa)
Old accommodations Osakaya in Akasawa.JPG
Narai (, Shiojiri-shi Narai)[42] post town 3 17.6 ha
(43 acres)
Post station of the Nakasend? and largest of the Kisoji with buildings from the Edo until the Meiji period. Shiojiri, Nagano
35°57?53.84?N 137°48?39.05?E / 35.9649556°N 137.8108472°E / 35.9649556; 137.8108472 (Shiojiri, Narai)
Small street lined by wooden two-storeyed houses.
Kiso-Hirasawa (?, Shiojiri-shi Kiso-hirasawa)[43] lacquerware town 2 12.5 ha
(31 acres)
Town houses and storehouse where Kiso lacquerware continues to be produced by traditional methods. Shiojiri, Nagano
35°58?49.48?N 137°49?55.6?E / 35.9804111°N 137.832111°E / 35.9804111; 137.832111 (Shiojiri, Kiso-hirasawa)
Small street lined by wooden two-storeyed houses.
Inariyama (, Chikuma-shi Inariyama)[44] merchant quarter 2 13 ha
(32 acres)
Originally founded during the Tensh? era as a castle town, Inariyama became a post station after the castle was abandoned in the Keich? era. Commercialization started in the 19th century and it turned into a distribution center for raw silk and textile products at the start of modern Japan. Chikuma, Nagano
36°32?11.62?N 138°6?16.8?E / 36.5365611°N 138.104667°E / 36.5365611; 138.104667 (Chikuma, Inariyama)
Inariyama-juku Kurashikan 1.jpg
Togakushi (, Nagano-shi Togakushi)[45] temple lodging (shukub?), temple town 2 73.3 ha
(181 acres)
Shukub? temple lodgings and houses of lay devotees around the lower and middle shrine of Togakushi Shrine. Togakushi, Nagano
36°44?10.13?N 138°4?55.23?E / 36.7361472°N 138.0820083°E / 36.7361472; 138.0820083 (Nagano, Togakushi)
--
Unno-juku (, T?mi-shi Unno-juku)[46] post town and sericulture community 1 13.2 ha
(33 acres)
Post station on the Hokkoku Kaid? established in 1625. From the Meiji period, the spacious rooms have been reused for silk farming. T?mi, Nagano
36°21?42.97?N 138°18?46.99?E / 36.3619361°N 138.3130528°E / 36.3619361; 138.3130528 (T?mi, Unno-juku)
Small street lined by wooden two-storeyed houses.
Tsumago-juku (?, Nagiso-machi Tsumago-juku)[47] post town 3 1,245.4 ha
(3,077 acres)
One of the 69 Stations of the Nakasend? and part of the Kisoji. In addition to the late Edo early Meiji period inn town, the designation includes part of the rural surroundings and three villages. Nagiso, Nagano
35°34?37.58?N 137°35?42.02?E / 35.5771056°N 137.5950056°E / 35.5771056; 137.5950056 (Nagiso, Tsumago)
Small street lined by wooden two-storeyed houses.
Aoni (, Hakuba-mura Aoni)[48] mountain village 3 59.7 ha
(148 acres)
Small mountain village with thatched houses and storehouses, about 200 rice fields, an irrigation channel from the late Edo, early Meiji period. Hakuba, Nagano
36°43?12.93?N 137°53?48.58?E / 36.7202583°N 137.8968278°E / 36.7202583; 137.8968278 (Hakuba, Aoni)
Aoni.jpg
Guj? Hachiman Kita-machi (, Guj?-shi Guj? Hachiman kitamachi)[49] castle town 3 14.1 ha
(35 acres)
Dense town of two-storied houses below Guj? Hachiman Castle with a water supply system surrounded on all sides by mountains and a river. Guj?, Gifu
35°45?11.11?N 136°57?25.91?E / 35.7530861°N 136.9571972°E / 35.7530861; 136.9571972 (Guj?, Guj? Hachiman Kita-machi)
Gujo-shi Gujo-hachiman kitamachi, Gifu, castle town.JPG
Hond?ri Iwamura-ch? (, Ena-shi Iwamura-ch? hond?ri)[50] merchant quarter 3 14.6 ha
(36 acres)
Merchant district of a former castle town that prospered during the Edo period as a political, cultural and economic center of the T?n? region Ena, Gifu
35°21?58.25?N 137°26?21.35?E / 35.3661806°N 137.4392639°E / 35.3661806; 137.4392639 (Ena, Iwamura-ch? Hond?ri)
Iwamura-cho.jpg
Shimoninomachi and ?shinmachi (?, Takayama-shi Shimoninomachi ?shinmachi)[51] merchant quarter 1 6.6 ha
(16 acres)
Edo and Meiji period merchant houses in a former castle town. Takayama, Gifu
36°8?49.72?N 137°15?31.7?E / 36.1471444°N 137.258806°E / 36.1471444; 137.258806 (Takayama, Shimoninomachi ?shinmachi)
Shimoninomachi Takahaya Gifu pref01s3s3870.jpg
Sanmachi (, Takayama-shi Sanmachi)[52] merchant quarter 1 4.4 ha
(11 acres)
Edo period merchant houses in a former castle town. Takayama, Gifu
36°8?28.13?N 137°15?38.19?E / 36.1411472°N 137.2606083°E / 36.1411472; 137.2606083 (Takayama, Sanmachi)
Small street lined by low two-storied wooden houses.
Ogimachi (, Shirakawa-mura Ogimachi)[53] mountain village 3 45.6 ha
(113 acres)
Farming village with gassh?-zukuri houses, paddy and other fields. Part of the World Heritage Site Historic Villages of Shirakawa-g? and Gokayama Shirakawa, Gifu
36°16?3.71?N 136°54?8.46?E / 36.2676972°N 136.9023500°E / 36.2676972; 136.9023500 (Shirakawa, Ogimachi)
Many wooden houses with steep thatched gabled roofs.
Mino-machi (, Mino-shi Minomachi)[54] merchant quarter 1 9.3 ha
(23 acres)
Former castle town that prospered as a commercial center during the Edo period. Mino, Gifu
35°32?43.75?N 136°54?43.54?E / 35.5454861°N 136.9120944°E / 35.5454861; 136.9120944 (Mino, Mino-machi)
Two storied traditional Japanese houses next to a street.
Hanazawa (, Yaizu-shi hanazawa)[55] mountain village 3 19.5 ha
(48 acres)
Village located in a river valley along a former main transportation road farming citrus fruits, tea and tobacco using seasonally occupied farmwork huts. Yaizu, Shizuoka
34°54?21.89?N 138°19?49.45?E / 34.9060806°N 138.3304028°E / 34.9060806; 138.3304028 (Yaizu, Hanazawa)
Yaizu hanazono area 01.JPG
Asuke (, Toyota-shi Asuke)[14] merchant quarter 1 21.5 ha
(53 acres)
An example of a commercial center in a mountain location that prospered through the circulation of goods. Large number of Edo period town houses . Toyota, Aichi
35°8?13.26?N 137°19?12.17?E / 35.1370167°N 137.3200472°E / 35.1370167; 137.3200472 (Toyota, Asuke)
Asuke toyota aichi japan.jpg
Arimatsu (, Nagoya-shi Arimatsu)[56] dyeing and weaving town 1 7.3 ha
(18 acres)
Founded in 1608 where the T?kaid? crosses the Owari Hills between Chiry?-juku and Narumi-juku, the town prospered through the invention of Arimatsu Shibori (tie-dye) which continues to be produced here. Nagoya, Aichi
35°4?0.12?N 136°58?13.96?E / 35.0667000°N 136.9705444°E / 35.0667000; 136.9705444 (Nagoya, Arimatsu)
Arimatsu1.JPG
Seki-juku (, Kameyama-shi Sekijuku)[57] post town 3 25 ha
(62 acres)
Post station on the T?kaid? extending for 1.8 km (1.1 mi) in east-west direction including two-storied town houses and the military headquarters. Kameyama, Mie
34°51?7.78?N 136°23?27.19?E / 34.8521611°N 136.3908861°E / 34.8521611; 136.3908861 (Kameyama, Seki-juku)
Two storied wooden houses next lining a street.
Hachiman (?, ?mihachiman-shi Hachiman)[58] merchant quarter 1 13.1 ha
(32 acres)
Built on the east side of Lake Biwa at the intersection of the Hokkoku Kaid? with the Nakasend? the town was used as a base by ?mi merchants which is reflected in the large number of elegant town and storehouses. ?mihachiman, Shiga
35°8?18.69?N 136°5?26.65?E / 35.1385250°N 136.0907361°E / 35.1385250; 136.0907361 (?mihachiman)
Two storied wooden houses next lining a street.
Sakamoto (, ?tsu-shi Sakamoto)[59] monks' dwellings and temple town 3 28.7 ha
(71 acres)
Temple town and study place for monks from Hiyoshi Taisha and Enryaku-ji. ?tsu, Shiga
35°4?14.25?N 135°52?16.1?E / 35.0706250°N 135.871139°E / 35.0706250; 135.871139 (?tsu, Sakamoto)
A path through a wooded area next to a wall of unhewn stones.
Kawaramachi and Serimachi district (?, Hikone-shi Kawaramachi Serimachi-chiku)[56] merchant quarter 2 5.0 ha
(12 acres)
Business district south east of the castle town of Hikone Castle that prospered from the Edo to the early Sh?wa period. Hikone, Shiga
35°15?47.71?N 136°15?28.87?E / 35.2632528°N 136.2580194°E / 35.2632528; 136.2580194 (Hikone, Kawaramachi and Serimachi)
Hikone Teishinsha201606.jpg
Gokash?-kond? (, Higashi?mi-shi Gokash?-kond?)[60] farming village 3 32.2 ha
(80 acres)
Farming village with a core of residences of ?mi merchants surrounded by traditional farm houses developed from the late Edo to the early Sh?wa period. Higashi?mi, Shiga
35°9?15.16?N 136°10?50.78?E / 35.1542111°N 136.1807722°E / 35.1542111; 136.1807722 (Higashi?mi, Gokash?-kond?)
Akindo street Kondo-cho Gokasho01nbs4592.jpg
Ine-ura (, Ine-ch? Ine-ura)[61] fishing village 3 310.2 ha
(767 acres)
Fishing village located on an inlet that is surrounded on three sides by mountains. Built from the late Edo to the early Sh?wa period, the residential part of the town houses are built on top of the boat shed. Ine, Kyoto
35°40?16.08?N 135°17?9.25?E / 35.6711333°N 135.2859028°E / 35.6711333; 135.2859028 (Kyoto, Ine)
Wooden houses built on and above water.
Gion-shinbashi (?, Ky?to-shi Gion-shinbashi)[62] tea house quarter 1 1.4 ha
(3.5 acres)
Pleasure quarter centered around Shinbashi-dori with buildings constructed just after a great fire in 1865. Kyoto, Kyoto
35°0?20.09?N 135°46?25.67?E / 35.0055806°N 135.7737972°E / 35.0055806; 135.7737972 (Kyoto, Gion Shinbashi)
Wooden two-storied houses lining a small street. The upper stories' windows are covered.
Saga-Toriimoto (, Ky?to-shi Saga-toriimoto)[63] temple town 3 2.6 ha
(6.4 acres)
Temple town with thatched houses centered around Adashino Nenbutsu-ji along the Atago Highway which leads to the Atago Shrine. Kyoto, Kyoto
35°1?37.01?N 135°39?56.38?E / 35.0269472°N 135.6656611°E / 35.0269472; 135.6656611 (Kyoto, Saga-Toriimoto)
Large red torii next to a wooden thatched house.
Sannei-zaka (, Ky?to-shi Sannei-zaka)[64] temple town 3 8.2 ha
(20 acres)
Former temple town serving among others, Hokan-ji, Kiyomizu-dera and Yasaka Shrine. The stretch from Sannei-zaka towards Ninen-zaka is lined by single-storied shops and tea houses with mushikomado () latticed windows. From Sannei-zaka to K?dai-ji there are two-storied Taish? period buildings in sukiya-zukuri style. Kyoto, Kyoto
34°59?56.81?N 135°46?50.62?E / 34.9991139°N 135.7807278°E / 34.9991139; 135.7807278 (Kyoto, Sannei-zaka)
Stone steps on a slope lined by houses.
Kamigamo (, Ky?to-shi Kamigamo)[65] shrine quarter 3 2.7 ha
(6.7 acres)
Residential neighborhood for the head priests of Kamigamo Shrine including a stone bridge, earthen walls, gates, frot gardens and single storied houses with sangawarabuki tile roofs,[note 7] Kyoto, Kyoto
35°3?28.19?N 135°45?18.73?E / 35.0578306°N 135.7552028°E / 35.0578306; 135.7552028 (Kyoto, Kamigamo)
Kamigamohondori1.JPG
Kita Miyama-ch? (?, Nantan-shi Miyama-ch? Kita)[67] mountain village 3 127.5 ha
(315 acres)
Village with about 50 thatched roof houses and hardened stone walls extending for about 600 m × 300 m (1,970 ft × 980 ft) along the upper stream of the Yura river. Nantan, Kyoto
35°18?48.3?N 135°37?23.58?E / 35.313417°N 135.6232167°E / 35.313417; 135.6232167 (Nantan, Miyama Kita)
Wooden houses with thatched roofs in a mountain setting.
Kaya (, Yosano-ch? Kaya)[68] textile town 2 12 ha
(30 acres)
Former castle town that developed in early modern Japan until the early Sh?wa period as a production center for Tango chirimen silk crêpe. Yosano, Kyoto
35°30?16.13?N 135°5?33.63?E / 35.5044806°N 135.0926750°E / 35.5044806; 135.0926750 (Yosano, Kaya)
Yosano-cho Kaya, Kyoto, historic industrial town.JPG
Tondabayashi (?, Tondabayashi-shi Tondabayashi)[69] jinaimachi town[note 2], zaig? town[note 3] 1 11.2 ha
(28 acres)
Founded as an Ikk? J?do Shinsh? jinaimachi in the late Muromachi period on a terrace of the Ishi river and centered around K?sh?-ji Betsuin temple. In the Edo period it became a zaig? town with large town houses lining the street. Tondabayashi, Osaka
34°30?1.41?N 135°36?4.25?E / 34.5003917°N 135.6011806°E / 34.5003917; 135.6011806 (Osaka, Tondabayashi)
A narrow street lined by houses with a wooden lower part, a white upper storey and tile roofs.
Sasayama (, Sasayama-shi Sasayama)[70] castle town 2 40.2 ha
(99 acres)
Samurai houses, merchant houses and the early Edo period Sasayama Castle founded by Tokugawa Ieyasu. Sasayama, Hy?go
35°4?16.4?N 135°13?18.89?E / 35.071222°N 135.2219139°E / 35.071222; 135.2219139 (Sasayama, Sasayama)
Thatched house beyond a white wall with a small gate which both have a thatched roof.
Fukusumi (, Sasayama-shi Fukusumi)[71] post town, farming village 3 25.2 ha
(62 acres)
Post town and farming community that developed along a major road with two storied tile roofed and single storied thatched houses, with entrances on the gable end. Sasayama, Hy?go
35°4?20.49?N 135°21?27.25?E / 35.0723583°N 135.3575694°E / 35.0723583; 135.3575694 (Sasayama, Fukusumi)
Sasayama fukuzumi001.JPG
?ya-ch? ?sugi (, yabu-shi ?ya-ch? ?sugi)[72][73] mountain village and sericulture community 3 5.8 ha
(14 acres)
Formerly one of the leading silk farming centers in Tajima Province prospering from the late Meiji to the early Sh?wa period. Yabu, Hy?go
35°19?52.46?N 134°39?2.95?E / 35.3312389°N 134.6508194°E / 35.3312389; 134.6508194 (Yabu, ?ya-ch? ?sugi)
Kitano-ch? and Yamamoto-d?ri (, K?be-shi Kitano-ch? Yamamoto-d?ri)[74] port quarter 1 9.3 ha
(23 acres)
District of foreign residences from the late Meiji and early Taish? Period that were established after the opening of the Port of Kobe in 1867. K?be, Hy?go
34°42?1.39?N 135°11?20.94?E / 34.7003861°N 135.1891500°E / 34.7003861; 135.1891500 (K?be, Kitano-ch? and Yamamoto-d?ri)
A row of non-Japanese looking wooden houses along a street.
Izushi (, Toyooka-shi Izushi) castle town 2 23.1 ha
(57 acres)
Town houses, temples, shrines, and samurai residences, that appeared in connection with the construction of Izushi Castle by Koide Yoshihide in 1604. Toyooka, Hy?go
35°27?46.68?N 134°52?26.79?E / 35.4629667°N 134.8741083°E / 35.4629667; 134.8741083 (Toyooka, Izushi)
Wooden houses and a wooden clock tower on a stone base.
Matsuyama (, Uda-shi Matsuyama)[75] merchant quarter 1 17 ha
(42 acres)
Located between Mount Shiroyama and the Uda River, Matsuyama developped from a castle town to a political and economic center of the Uda District. The town houses date from the late Edo to the early Sh?wa period. Uda, Nara
34°28?45.87?N 135°55?58.57?E / 34.4794083°N 135.9329361°E / 34.4794083; 135.9329361 (Uda, Matsuyama)
Wooden houses lining small streets.
Imai-ch? (, Kashihara-shi Imai-ch?)[76] jinaimachi town[note 2], zaig? town[note 3] 1 17.4 ha
(43 acres)
Originating as an autonomous religious community centered around Sh?nen-ji () during the Muromachi Period, the town was formerly surrounded by a moat. Kashihara, Nara
34°30?25.86?N 135°47?10.35?E / 34.5071833°N 135.7862083°E / 34.5071833; 135.7862083 (Kashihara, Imai-ch?)
Wooden houses with a white upper storey lining a small street.
Goj?-shinmachi (?, Goj?-shi Goj?-shinmachi) merchant quarter 1 7 ha
(17 acres)
Large number of Edo period town houses of a flourishing merchant town of south Yamato. Goj?, Nara
34°20?53.94?N 135°41?31.78?E / 34.3483167°N 135.6921611°E / 34.3483167; 135.6921611 (Goj?, Goj?-Shinmachi)
130629 Gojo Shinmachi Gojo Nara pref Japan14s3.jpg
Yuasa (, Yuasa-ch? Yuasa)[77] brewers quarter 2 6.3 ha
(16 acres)
Soy sauce maker district that flourished at the end of the 16th century, with shops and storehouses dating to the Edo period, the oldest are two-storied structures with gabled roof and hongawara tiles[note 8] Yuasa, Wakayama
34°2?11.68?N 135°10?28.56?E / 34.0365778°N 135.1746000°E / 34.0365778; 135.1746000 (Yuasa, Yuasa)
A small street lined by wooden two-storied houses.
Utsubuki-tamagawa (?, Kurayoshi-shi Utsubuki-tamagawa)[79] merchant quarter 1 9.2 ha
(23 acres)
Commercial and industrial city that prospered from the Edo to the Taish? period. The preservation district consists of town house, storehouses with white plaster walls and reddish roofs. Kurayoshi, Tottori
35°25?56.1?N 133°49?23.12?E / 35.432250°N 133.8230889°E / 35.432250; 133.8230889 (Kurayoshi, Utsubuki-tamagawa)
Wooden houses with white upper stories.
Tokorogo (, Daisen-ch? Tokorogo)[80] farming village 3 25.8 ha
(64 acres)
Farming village with river irrigation from the Amida River, consisting of large scale main buildings and affiliated houses from the early modern period until the early Sh?wa period including the Kadowaki Family House (). Daisen, Tottori
35°28?58.99?N 133°28?0.81?E / 35.4830528°N 133.4668917°E / 35.4830528; 133.4668917 (Daisen, Tokorogo)
Large wooden house with thatched roof.
Yunotsu (, ?da-shi Yunotsu)[81] port quarter, hot-spring town 2 36.6 ha
(90 acres)
The hot spring area developed from medieval times as port for the Iwami Ginzan Silver Mine (a World Heritage Site). The current townscape of hot spring ryokan located in a narrow and steep valley date from the late Edo to the early Sh?wa period. ?da, Shimane
35°5?44.3?N 132°20?52.12?E / 35.095639°N 132.3478111°E / 35.095639; 132.3478111 (?da, Yunotsu)
Small street lined by wooden houses.
?mori-ginzan (?, ?da-shi ?mori-ginzan)[82] mining town 3 162.7 ha
(402 acres)
Townscape around the Iwami Ginzan Silver Mine (a World Heritage Site) with a mixture of samurai residences and town houses built from the Edo period onward. ?da, Shimane
35°6?51.31?N 132°26?42.9?E / 35.1142528°N 132.445250°E / 35.1142528; 132.445250 (?da, ?mori-ginzan)
Oomori machinami.jpg
Tsuwano (?, Tsuwano-ch? Tsuwano)[83] samurai quarter, merchant quarter 2 11.1 ha
(27 acres)
Developed in the early Edo period as a castle town of Tsuwano Castle, Tsuwano contains residences of senior vassals and a merchant district centered along the old San'ind?. Tsuwano, Shimane
34°27?59.12?N 131°46?19.02?E / 34.4664222°N 131.7719500°E / 34.4664222; 131.7719500 (Tsuwano, Tsuwano)
Tsuwano street 003.JPG
Fukiya (, Takahashi-shi Fukiya)[84] mining town 3 6.4 ha
(16 acres)
Copper mining town and leading producer of copper in Ch?goku from the Muromachi to the Meiji period. With the decline of copper production in the Edo period, production shifted to Red Iron Oxide (Bengala) which prospered until the Taish? period. The houses feature red clay tile roofs, rouge mud walls and latticework. Takahashi, Okayama
34°51?39.96?N 133°28?13.64?E / 34.8611000°N 133.4704556°E / 34.8611000; 133.4704556 (Takahashi, Fukiya)
Small street lined by wooden houses.
Kurashiki-gawahan (?, Kurashiki-shi Kurashiki-gawahan)[85] merchant quarter 1 15 ha
(37 acres)
Founded by Ukita Hideie, it later became the port of the Bitch?-Matsuyama Domain and served as relay point for goods to Kyoto. The townscape consists of glazed tile roofs and canals. Kurashiki, Okayama
34°35?46.96?N 133°46?17.34?E / 34.5963778°N 133.7714833°E / 34.5963778; 133.7714833 (Kurashiki, Kurashiki-gawahan)
White houses with roof tiling next to a small channel.
J?t? (, Tsuyama-shi J?t?)[86] merchant quarter 1 8.1 ha
(20 acres)
Merchant district that developed from the castle town of Tsuyama Castle, with buildings constructed from the Edo to the Sh?wa period, featuring k?shiirimado (?) and mushikomado () latticed windows, namako walls and sodekabe () side walls. Tsuyama, Okayama
35°3?45.55?N 134°0?51.55?E / 35.0626528°N 134.0143194°E / 35.0626528; 134.0143194 (Tsuyama, J?t?)
Joto Tsuyama Okayama10n3200.jpg
Mitarai Yutaka-machi (?, Kure-shi Yutaka-machi Mitarai)[87] port quarter 2 6.9 ha
(17 acres)
With the development of the Western Circuit (, nishimawari k?ro) shipping route through the Seto Inland Sea in the Edo period, Yutaka-machi Mitarai grew as a port for ships waiting for rising tide or favourable winds. The town includes gabled houses with sangawarabuki roofs[note 7] and is dotted with western style house. The port area retains its historical character with groynes, stepped piers and a lighthouse. Kure, Hiroshima
34°10?45.57?N 132°52?1.7?E / 34.1793250°N 132.867139°E / 34.1793250; 132.867139 (Kure, Yutakamachi Mitarai)
Wooden houses with white walls.
Takehara district (?, Takehara-shi Takehara-chiku)[88] salt works town 1 5 ha
(12 acres)
Market and port town that prospered with the introduction of salt pans in 1650. From the late Edo period and backed by the economic development the town became a center of learning, tea ceremony and other refined cultural activities. The current townscape with hongawarabuki roofs[note 8] and solid plastered fire-resistant wall (?, shikkui nurigome) dates from the Edo to the early Sh?wa period. Takehara, Hiroshima
34°20?48.45?N 132°54?36.08?E / 34.3467917°N 132.9100222°E / 34.3467917; 132.9100222 (Takehara, Takehara)
A row of black houses.
Tomo-ch? (, fukuyama-shi tomo-ch?)[89] port quarter 2 8.6 ha
(21 acres)
Port town along the main shipping routes along the Seto Inland Sea with Edo period town houses, temples, shrines, stone structures and harbour facilities. Fukuyama, Hiroshima
34°23?1.36?N 133°22?54.37?E / 34.3837111°N 133.3817694°E / 34.3837111; 133.3817694 (Fukuyama, Tomo)
Hamasaki (?, Hagi-shi Hamasaki)[90] port quarter 2 10.3 ha
(25 acres)
Port town formed together with a castle town at the mouth of the Abu River. It flourished in early modern Japan in the shipbuilding and fishery industry and prospered from the Taish? to the early Sh?wa period as a trading center for small dried sardines () and Natsumikan. Hagi, Yamaguchi
34°25?10.02?N 131°24?0.24?E / 34.4194500°N 131.4000667°E / 34.4194500; 131.4000667 (Hagi, Hamasaki)
Hamasaki Hagi 01.JPG
Hiyako district (?, Hagi-shi Hiyako-chiku)[91] samurai quarter 2 4 ha
(9.9 acres)
Samurai residences near the Hashimoto River that were created with the development of the castle. In addition to residential architecture the district includes a Nagayamon gate and storehouses. Hagi, Yamaguchi
34°24?14.07?N 131°23?20.85?E / 34.4039083°N 131.3891250°E / 34.4039083; 131.3891250 (Hagi, Hiyako)
Hagi-hiyako yamaguchi japan.JPG
Horiuchi district (, Hagi-shi Horiuchi-chiku)[92] samurai quarter 2 77.4 ha
(191 acres)
This district covers almost the whole area of the third bailey of Hagi Castle founded by M?ri Terumoto in 1608. It contained the domain's offices and residences of M?ri's household and high ranked samurai. Hagi, Yamaguchi
34°24?45.96?N 131°23?13.66?E / 34.4127667°N 131.3871278°E / 34.4127667; 131.3871278 (Hagi, Horiuchi)
Hagi-shi Horiuchi-chiku, Yamaguchi, samurai quarter.JPG
Sasanamiichi (, Hagi-shi Sasanamiichi)[14] post town 2 20.8 ha
(51 acres)
A former post town set among rice fields and situated along the main highway of the Hagi Domain. The town was redeveloped by the appearance of tea houses in early modern times. Houses with thatched and sangawarabuki roofs[note 7] Hagi, Yamaguchi
34°17?13.66?N 131°27?48.2?E / 34.2871278°N 131.463389°E / 34.2871278; 131.463389 (Hagi, Sasanamiichi)
Hagi-shi Sasanamiichi, Yamaguchi, post town.JPG
Furuichi and Kanaya (?, Yanai-shi Furuichi-Kanaya)[93] merchant quarter 1 1.7 ha
(4.2 acres)
Due to its strategic location on the Seto Inland Sea and on Yanai River, Yanai flourished since ancient times as a trading center. Merchant houses with hongawarabuki roofs[note 8] and solid plastered fire-resistant wall (?, shikkui nurigome). Yanai, Yamaguchi
33°58?9.63?N 132°6?29.92?E / 33.9693417°N 132.1083111°E / 33.9693417; 132.1083111 (Yanai, Furuichi and Kanaya)
Yanai City 01.JPG
Ochiai Higashiiyayama-son (?, Miyoshi-shi Higashiiyayamason Ochiai)[94] mountain village 3 32.3 ha
(80 acres)
Village and farmland on a steep mountain slope supported by dry-stone walls with private houses dating to the 18th century. Miyoshi, Tokushima
33°52?56.69?N 133°56?3.65?E / 33.8824139°N 133.9343472°E / 33.8824139; 133.9343472 (Miyoshi, Ochiai Higashiiyayama-son)
Higashi-Iya Ochiai 201303-1.JPG
Minami-machi Wakimachi (?, Wakimachi Minami-machi)[95] merchant quarter 1 5.3 ha
(13 acres)
A district that preserves private houses from each period after the beginning of the 18th century. The houses have a distinctive design with tile roofs, decorative udatsu () posts and the frame cased in a fireproof coat of plaster (, ?kabe-zukuri). Mima, Tokushima
34°4?7.5?N 134°8?47.63?E / 34.068750°N 134.1465639°E / 34.068750; 134.1465639 (Mima, Minami-machi Waki-machi)
Wooden houses with white walls, roof tiles and protruding walls.
Mugi, Teba Island (, Mugi-ch? Teba-jima) fishing village 3 3.7 ha
(9.1 acres)
Fishing village formed around a cove at the northern end of Teba Island from 1800 due to the immigration policy of the Tokushima Domain. From the Meiji to the prewar Sh?wa period it prospered through bonito and tuna fishing. Teba Island, Mugi, Tokushima
33°38?13?N 134°25?25.52?E / 33.63694°N 134.4237556°E / 33.63694; 134.4237556 (Muugi, Teba Island)
Small boats and houses.
Kasajima Shiwakuhonjima-ch? (?, Marugame-shi Shiwakuhonjima-ch? Kasajima)[96] port quarter 3 13.1 ha
(32 acres)
A former castle town with houses from the mid-Edo to the Meiji period, where members of the Shiwaku Suigun lived. Marugame, Kagawa
34°23?40.02?N 133°47?15.28?E / 34.3944500°N 133.7875778°E / 34.3944500; 133.7875778 (Marugama, Shiwakuhonjima-ch? Kasajima)
White two-storied houses.
Unomachi Uwa-ch? (, Seiyo-shi Uwa-ch? Unomachi)[97] zaig? town[note 3] 2 4.9 ha
(12 acres)
Former zaig? hometown of the Uwajima Domain originating from a castle town of Matsuba Castle () that functioned during the Edo period as a trading center for agricultural produce and hinoki cypress as well as a post station on the Uwajima road and gateway to Meiseki-ji on the Shikoku Pilgrimage. The preservation district includes remains of town houses from the Edo to the Sh?wa Period as well as western style churches and schools. Seiyo, Ehime
33°21?50.15?N 132°30?42.83?E / 33.3639306°N 132.5118972°E / 33.3639306; 132.5118972 (Seiyo, Unomachi Uwa-ch?)
Street lined with wooden houses with white walls.
Y?kaichi-gokoku (, Uchiko-ch? Y?kaichi-gokoku)[98] wax maker quarter 3 3.5 ha
(8.6 acres)
Wax maker town with houses from the Edo and Meiji Period that developed along the Konpira road of the Shikoku Pilgrimage. The buildings line a 750 m (2,460 ft) long street and have plastered fireproof walls (). Uchiko, Ehime
33°33?24.37?N 132°39?12.43?E / 33.5567694°N 132.6534528°E / 33.5567694; 132.6534528 (Uchiko, Y?kaichi-gokoku)
Uchiko1,Uchiko-town,Japan.JPG
Doikach? (?, Aki-shi Doikach?)[99] samurai quarter 2 9.2 ha
(23 acres)
Samurai town with narrow ordered streets, hedges, fences and houses from the late Edo to the early Sh?wa period. Aki, K?chi
33°31?10.41?N 133°54?44.78?E / 33.5195583°N 133.9124389°E / 33.5195583; 133.9124389 (Aki, Doikach?)
Noradokei 02.JPG
Kiragawa-ch? (?, Muroto-shi Kiragawa-ch?)[100] zaig? town[note 3] 1 18.3 ha
(45 acres)
Residential town with merchant and store houses on a narrow plot along the road connecting K?chi with Muroto. Buildings have white plastered walls and characteristic water-draining tiles (?). Muroto, K?chi
33°19?52.9?N 134°5?56.3?E / 33.331361°N 134.098972°E / 33.331361; 134.098972 (Muroto, Kiragawa-ch?)
Kiragawacho 03.JPG
Niikawa and Tagomori (, Ukiha-shi Niikawa Tagomori)[101] mountain village 3 71.2 ha
(176 acres)
Villages with irrigation channel rice farming along the Kumanoue River valley in the Min? Mountains. The villages contain houses with thatched yosemune style [note 9] roofs as well as irimoya style tile-roofed houses that gained popularity starting in the Meiji period. In addition the preservation district includes stone walls, main and wayside Shinto shrines. Ukiha, Fukuoka
33°16?36.41?N 130°49?56.04?E / 33.2767806°N 130.8322333°E / 33.2767806; 130.8322333 (Ukiha, Niikawa and Tagomori)
Chikugo-yoshii (, Ukiha-shi Chikugo-yoshii)[103] zaig? town[note 3] 3 20.7 ha
(51 acres)
A former post station along the Bungo Road that, in the second half of the Edo period, developed into a residential town and economic center of the Chikugo district. After a large fire in 1867, houses received plaster fireproofing walls. Ukiha, Fukuoka
33°20?33.56?N 130°45?26.83?E / 33.3426556°N 130.7574528°E / 33.3426556; 130.7574528 (Ukiha, Chikugo-yoshii)
White houses with a characteristic net pattern on the lower part of the outer walls.
Kurogi (, Yame-shi Kurogi)[104] zaig? town[note 3] 3 18.4 ha
(45 acres)
Yame, Fukuoka Yame-kurogi fukuoka japan.JPG
Akizuki (, Asakura-shi Akizuki)[105] castle town 2 58.6 ha
(145 acres)
Asakura, Fukuoka
Yame-fukushima (?, Yame-shi Yame-fukushima)[106] merchant quarter 2 19.8 ha
(49 acres)
Yame, Fukuoka
Shiotatsu (, Ureshino-shi Shiotatsu)[107] merchant quarter 2 12.8 ha
(32 acres)
Ureshino, Saga Wooden houses with white walls.
Hamashozu-machi and Hamakanaya-machi (, Kashima-shi Hamash?zu-machi Hamakanaya-machi)[108] port quarter and zaig? town[note 3] 2 2 ha
(4.9 acres)
Kashima, Saga
Hachihongi-shuku (?, Kashima-shi Hachihongi-shuku)[109] brewers town 1 6.7 ha
(17 acres)
Kashima, Saga
Arita-uchiyama (?, Arita-machi Arita-uchiyama)[110] porcelain-maker town 3 15.9 ha
(39 acres)
Arita, Saga
K?jiro-k?ji (?, Unzen-shi K?jiro-k?ji)[111] samurai quarter 2 9.8 ha
(24 acres)
Unzen, Nagasaki Small street lined by walls.
Higashi-yamate (, Nagasaki-shi Higashi-yamate)[112] port quarter 2 7.5 ha
(19 acres)
Nagasaki, Nagasaki Slope, stone walls and a wooden house.
Minami-yamate (, Nagasaki-shi Minami-yamate)[113] port quarter 2 17 ha
(42 acres)
Nagasaki, Nagasaki The Glover Garden.
K?noura ?shima-mura (, Hirado-shi ?shima-mura K?noura)[114] port quarter 2 21.2 ha
(52 acres)
Hirado, Nagasaki Konoura hirado nagasaki japan.JPG
Mameda-machi (, Hita-shi Mameda-machi)[115] merchant quarter 2 10.7 ha
(26 acres)
Hita, ?ita Wooden houses.
Kita-dai and Minami-dai (?, Kitsuki-shi kita-dai minami-dai)[89] samurai quarter 2 16.1 ha
(40 acres)
Kitsuki, ?ita
Tonegawa (, Shiibason Tonegawa)[116] mountain village 3 39.9 ha
(99 acres)
Shiiba, Miyazaki Shiibamura miyazaki japan.JPG
Mimitsu (, Hyuga-shi Mimitsu)[117] port quarter 2 7.2 ha
(18 acres)
Hyuga, Miyazaki Two-storied wooden houses.
Obi (, Nichinan-shi Obi)[118] samurai quarter 2 19.8 ha
(49 acres)
Nichinan, Miyazaki Obi06.jpg
Iriki-fumoto (, Satsumasendai-shi Iriki-fumoto)[119] samurai quarter 2 19.2 ha
(47 acres)
Satsumasendai, Kagoshima Small street lined with low stone walls.
Izumi-fumoto (, Izumi-shi Izumi-fumoto)[120] samurai quarter 2 43.8 ha
(108 acres)
Izumi, Kagoshima Tatebaba dori Izumi.JPG
Chiran (, Minamiky?sh?-shi Chiran)[121] samurai quarter 2 18.6 ha
(46 acres)
Minamiky?sh?, Kagoshima Small street lined with low stone walls.
Tonaki Island (, Tonaki-son Tonaki-jima)[122] farming village 3 21.4 ha
(53 acres)
Tonaki, Okinawa View of Tonaki Island.jpg
Taketomi (, Taketomi-ch? Taketomi-jima)[123] farming village 3 38.3 ha
(95 acres)
Taketomi, Okinawa Houses surrounded by low stone walls of unhewn stones.

See also

Notes

  1. ^ The total in this column is larger than the number of designated groups, because some of the designated properties belong to more than one type.
  2. ^ a b c A jinai-machi, jinai-ch? () is an autonomous religious community that appeared in the Muromachi Period.
  3. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k During the Edo period, zaig? towns (, zaig?-machi) were areas in the countryside where artisans and merchants lived under the administration of a nearby village's bugy?.
  4. ^ (ch?mon-zukuri, ): a type of minka, vernecular house, with one or more wings projecting at right angles from the main house[15]
  5. ^ (yakuimon, ): a gate with a gabled roof, two square or rectangular main posts and two square or circular secondary posts[17]
  6. ^ (sodegura, ): a type of storehouse flanking the main shop with the roofs at right angles to the main building[18]
  7. ^ a b c (sangawarabuki, ): a roof tile combining a broad concave tile with a semi-cylindrical convex tile into one tile. The tile is square undulating from concave to convex.[66]
  8. ^ a b c (hongawarabuki, ): a tile roof composed of flat broad concave tiles and semi-cylindrical convex tiles covering the seams of the former[78]
  9. ^ (yosemune-zukuri, ): a hipped roof where the front and back are trapezoidal and the sides triangular in shape; in Japan generally used for buildings of less importance[102]

References

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  45. ^ Template:Cite webn
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  47. ^ [Tsumago-juku] (in Japanese). Tsumago Sightseeing Association. Retrieved . 
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  49. ^ [Guj? Hachiman kitamachi] (in Japanese). Guj? city. Retrieved . 
  50. ^ [Hond?ri Iwamura-ch?] (in Japanese). Ena city. Retrieved . 
  51. ^ ? [Shimoninomachi ?shinmachi] (in Japanese). Denken. Retrieved . 
  52. ^ [Sanmachi] (in Japanese). Takayama city. Archived from the original on 2010-07-12. Retrieved . 
  53. ^ [Ogimachi] (in Japanese). Denken. Retrieved . 
  54. ^ [Minomachi] (in Japanese). Denken. Retrieved . 
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  65. ^ [Kamigamo] (in Japanese). Agency for Cultural Affairs. Archived from the original on 2009-04-28. Retrieved . 
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  98. ^ [Y?kaichi-gokoku]. Cultural Heritage Online (in Japanese). Agency for Cultural Affairs. Retrieved . 
  99. ^ ? [Aki-shi Doikach?] (in Japanese). Aki. Retrieved . 
  100. ^ ? [Kiragawa-ch?]. Cultural Heritage Online (in Japanese). Agency for Cultural Affairs. Retrieved . 
  101. ^ [Ukiha-shi Niikawa Tagomori] (in Japanese). Ukiha, Fukuoka. Retrieved . 
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  103. ^ [Chikugo-yoshii]. Cultural Heritage Online (in Japanese). Agency for Cultural Affairs. Retrieved . 
  104. ^ [Kurogi]. Cultural Heritage Online (in Japanese). Agency for Cultural Affairs. Archived from the original on 2011-07-23. Retrieved . 
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  106. ^ ? [Yame-fukushima]. Cultural Heritage Online (in Japanese). Agency for Cultural Affairs. Retrieved . 
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  108. ^ [Hamashozumachi and Hamakanayamachi] (in Japanese). Denken. Retrieved . 
  109. ^ ? [Hachihongi-shuku] (in Japanese). Denken. Retrieved . 
  110. ^ ? [Arita-uchiyama] (in Japanese). Denken. Retrieved . 
  111. ^ ? [K?jiro-k?ji]. Cultural Heritage Online (in Japanese). Agency for Cultural Affairs. Archived from the original on 2011-07-23. Retrieved . 
  112. ^ [Higashi-yamate]. Cultural Heritage Online (in Japanese). Agency for Cultural Affairs. Archived from the original on 2011-07-23. Retrieved . 
  113. ^ [Minami-yamate]. Cultural Heritage Online (in Japanese). Agency for Cultural Affairs. Retrieved . 
  114. ^ [K?noura ?shima-mura] (in Japanese). Hirado city. Archived from the original on 2011-06-12. Retrieved . 
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  116. ^ [Tonegawa]. Cultural Heritage Online (in Japanese). Agency for Cultural Affairs. Retrieved . 
  117. ^ [Mimitsu]. Cultural Heritage Online (in Japanese). Agency for Cultural Affairs. Retrieved . 
  118. ^ [Obi]. Cultural Heritage Online (in Japanese). Agency for Cultural Affairs. Archived from the original on 2011-07-23. Retrieved . 
  119. ^ [Iriki-fumoto]. Cultural Heritage Online (in Japanese). Agency for Cultural Affairs. Retrieved . 
  120. ^ [Izumi-fumoto]. Cultural Heritage Online (in Japanese). Agency for Cultural Affairs. Archived from the original on 2011-07-23. Retrieved . 
  121. ^ [Chiran]. Cultural Heritage Online (in Japanese). Agency for Cultural Affairs. Archived from the original on 2011-07-23. Retrieved . 
  122. ^ [Tonaki]. Cultural Heritage Online (in Japanese). Agency for Cultural Affairs. Retrieved . 
  123. ^ [Taketomi]. Cultural Heritage Online (in Japanese). Agency for Cultural Affairs. Archived from the original on 2011-07-23. Retrieved . 

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