Haitinger Prize
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Haitinger Prize

The Haitinger Prize of the Austrian Academy of Sciences was founded in 1904 by the chemist and factory director, Ludwig Camillo Haitinger (1860-1945), who created the award in honor of his father,[1] Karl Ludwig Haitinger. From 1905 to 1943 it was awarded every year,[2] for "studies in chemistry and physics that proved to be of great practical use for industrial applications".[3] The prize was awarded for the last time in the year 1954.[]

Winners

Rudolf Scheuble for candles which burn in color[6]
F. Wenzel[5]
Wilhelm Schmidt[5] for research on microclimatology[11]
Otto Hönigschmid for measurement of atomic mass[13]
Julius Zellner[5]
Hans Thirring[5] for studies on general relativity[18]
Anton Kailan for research on radium and ultraviolet radiation[21]
Gerhard Kirsch for research on nuclear physics and geologic time measurement[24]
Ludwig Moser for quantitative rules for metals[26]
J. Lindner for organic chemistry[5]
L. Schmid for organic chemistry[5]
Berta Karlik[28] for her work on luminescence[29]

References

  1. ^ Ronge, Grete (1966). "Haitinger, Ludwig Camillo" (in German). Neue Deutsche Biographie. Retrieved 2016. 
  2. ^ a b c d e Reif-Acherman 2008, p. 1907.
  3. ^ a b Reif-Acherman 2008, p. 1902.
  4. ^ Volk 2012, p. 533.
  5. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m n o p Dazinger, Walter (27 January 2014). "Preisträger des Haitinger-Preises 1905-1936" (PDF) (in German). Institut für Angewandte Synthesechemie, Vienna, Austria: Die Ignaz-Lieben-Gesellschaft Verein zur Förderung der Wissenschaftsgeschichte. p. 5. Archived from the original (PDF) on 5 March 2016. Retrieved 2016. 
  6. ^ Scheuble, Rudolf (21 March 1908). "Candle Emitting a Colored Light" (PDF). Washington, DC: US Patent Office. Retrieved 2016. 
  7. ^ "Scientific Notes and News". Science. Washington, DC: American Association for the Advancement of Science. 26 (654): 60. 12 July 1907. JSTOR 1632366. 
  8. ^ O'Connor, J J; Robertson, E F (November 2006). "Marian Smoluchowski". School of Mathematics and Statistics University of St Andrews, Scotland. Retrieved 2016. 
  9. ^ Tanner & Walters 1998, p. 37.
  10. ^ "Defant, Albert Joseph Maria". Charles Scribner's Sons: Encyclopedia. 2008. Retrieved 2016. 
  11. ^ "Schmidt, Wilhelm, *1883" (in German). Österreich-Lexikon. Retrieved 2016. 
  12. ^ "National Institutes of Health Bulletin, September 1920". Mocavo. Retrieved 2016. 
  13. ^ Birckenbach, Lothar (1949). "Otto Hönigschmid 1878-1945". Chemische Berichte (in German). Vienna, Austria: Wiley-VCH Verlag. 82 (4-5): XI-LXV. doi:10.1002/cber.19490820423. 
  14. ^ Pohl 2004, p. 264.
  15. ^ "Hall of Fame: Heinrich Mache" (in German). Vienna, Austria: Technische Universität Wien. 18 December 2015. Retrieved 2016. 
  16. ^ Angetter & Martischnig 2005, p. 22.
  17. ^ Moore 1992, p. 122.
  18. ^ Thirring, H. (1918). "Über die Wirkung rotierender ferner Massen in der Einsteinschen Gravitationstheorie". Physikalische Zeitschrift (in German). 19: 33-39. 
  19. ^ Blumesberger, Doppelhofer & Mauthe 2002, p. 690.
  20. ^ Killy 2006, p. 710.
  21. ^ "Kailan, Anton (1879-1939), Chemiker" (in German). Vienna, Austria: Österreichischen Akademie der Wissenschaften. 2003. Retrieved 2016. 
  22. ^ Höflechner, Walter (2010). "Smekal, Adolf Gustav Stephan" (in German). Neue Deutsche Biographie. Retrieved 2016. 
  23. ^ Angetter & Martischnig 2005, p. 1.
  24. ^ Angetter & Martischnig 2005, p. 64.
  25. ^ "Kremann, Robert (1879-1937), Chemiker" (in German). Vienna, Austria: Österreichischen Akademie der Wissenschaften. 2003. Retrieved 2016. 
  26. ^ "Moser, Ludwig (1879-1930), Chemiker" (in German). Vienna, Austria: Österreichischen Akademie der Wissenschaften. 2003. Retrieved 2016. 
  27. ^ Angetter & Martischnig 2005, p. 140.
  28. ^ a b Rentetzi 2008, p. 223.
  29. ^ a b Rosner 2003, p. 32.
  30. ^ "Kratky, Otto" (in German). Austria-Forum. Retrieved 2016. 
  31. ^ Angetter & Martischnig 2005, p. 9.
  32. ^ "Vienna Academy of Sciences: Prize Awards". Nature. London, England: Nature Publishing Group. 143. 18 February 1939. doi:10.1038/143298b0. 
  33. ^ "Berta Karlik" (in German). Vienna, Austria: Universität Wien Projekt Lise. 2010. Retrieved 2016. 

Sources


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