Heights Of State Capitols

State capitols of states in the United States of America have often been among the tallest buildings in their states or capital cities at the time of their construction and remain significant landmarks. The height of state capitol buildings is often also a source of pride in states, in particular for those that have capitols that exceed in height the 288-foot United States Capitol in Washington, D.C.[1]

In addition to the US capitol and state capitols, city halls are often of significance as landmarks and exceed the height of state capitols. City halls of notable stature include Philadelphia City Hall (548 feet),[2]Los Angeles City Hall (454 feet),[3]Kansas City City Hall (443 feet),[4]Buffalo City Hall (398 feet)[5] and Milwaukee City Hall (393 feet).[6]

State Height of capitol building in feet
Alabama State Capitol 119 [7]
Alaska State Capitol 118 [8]
Arizona State Capitol 092 [9]
Arkansas State Capitol 230 [10]
California State Capitol 247 [11]
Colorado State Capitol 272 [12]
Connecticut State Capitol 257 [13]
Delaware Legislative Hall - Estimate: 070 [14]
Florida State Capitol 322 [15]
Georgia State Capitol 272 [16]
Hawaii State Capitol - Estimate: 100 [17]
Idaho State Capitol 208 [18]
Illinois State Capitol 361 [19]
Indiana Statehouse 256 [20]
Iowa State Capitol 275 [21]
Kansas State Capitol 326 [22]
Kentucky State Capitol 210 [23]
Louisiana State Capitol 450 [24]
Maine State House 185 [25]
Maryland State House 181 [26]
Massachusetts State House - Estimate: 200 [27]
Michigan State Capitol 270 [28]
Minnesota State Capitol 223 [29]
Mississippi State Capitol 180 [30]
Missouri State Capitol 238 [31]
Montana State Capitol 165 [32]
Nebraska State Capitol 400 [33]
Nevada State Capitol 112 [34]
New Hampshire State House 150 [35]
New Jersey State House 145 [36]
New Mexico State Capitol - Estimate: 035 [37]
New York State Capitol 220 [38]
North Carolina State Capitol 098 [39]
North Dakota State Capitol 242 [40]
Ohio Statehouse 158 [41]
Oklahoma State Capitol 255 [42]
Oregon State Capitol 162 [43]
Pennsylvania State Capitol 272 [44]
Rhode Island State Capitol 223 [45]
South Carolina State House 180 [46]
South Dakota State Capitol 161 [47]
Tennessee State Capitol 206 [48]
Texas State Capitol 311 [49]
Utah State Capitol 286 [50]
Vermont State House 136 [51]
Virginia State Capitol 083 [52]
Washington State Capitol 287 [53]
West Virginia State Capitol 292 [54]
Wisconsin State Capitol 284 [55]
Wyoming State Capitol 146 [56]

References

  1. ^ For U.S. capitol height: "About the U.S. Capitol Building". Architect of the Capitol. Retrieved .  Examples of states that take pride in their capitol's height include West Virginia ("State Capitol Comples". West Virginia Division of Culture and History. Retrieved . ) and Texas ("The Texas Capitol". Texas State Preservation Board. Retrieved . )
  2. ^ "City Hall Virtual Tour". City of Philadelphia. Retrieved . 
  3. ^ "Los Angeles City Hall, Los Angeles". SkyscraperPage.com. Retrieved . 
  4. ^ "City Hall History". City of Kansas City. Retrieved . 
  5. ^ "City Hall History". City of Buffalo. Archived from the original on 2013-09-03. Retrieved . 
  6. ^ "Milwaukee History". City of Milwaukee. Retrieved . 
  7. ^ Daniel, Jean Houston; Daniel, Price (1969). Executive Mansions and Capitols of America. Waukesha, Wisconsin: Country Beautiful. p. 145. ; "Alabama State Capitol, Montgomery". Retrieved . 
  8. ^ "Alaska State Capitol, Juneau". SkyscraperPage.com. Retrieved . 
  9. ^ "Original Arizona State Capitol, Phoenix". SkyscraperPage.com. Retrieved . ; The branches of the state government have relocated from the original capitol to adjacent buildings and additions.
  10. ^ "Arkansas State Capitol, Little Rock". SkyscraperPage.com. Retrieved . 
  11. ^ "California State Capitol, Sacramento". SkyscraperPage.com. Retrieved . 
  12. ^ "Review of Colorado State Capitol". Frommers. Retrieved . 
  13. ^ "Connecticut State Capitol and Legislative Office Building" (PDF). Government of Connecticut. Retrieved . 
  14. ^ Estimate of 70 based on photograph
  15. ^ "New Florida State Capitol, Tallahassee". SkyscraperPage.com. Retrieved . 
  16. ^ Edwin L. Jackson, Carl Vinson Institute of Government, The University of Georgia. "The Story of Georgia's Capitol and Capital Cities". Digital Library of Georgia. Retrieved . 
  17. ^ This appears to be an estimate that is used in Hawaii. "Cupolas of Capitalism". Cupola Consulting. Retrieved . 
  18. ^ "Idaho Capitol Building". Idaho Public Television. Retrieved . 
  19. ^ "IL State Capitol". Historic Sites Commission of Springfield, Illinois. Archived from the original on 2012-05-12. Retrieved . 
  20. ^ "Indiana's Third State Capitol Building Design Released to the Hoosier Public". Indiana Historic Newspaper Digitization Project. Archived from the original on 2013-11-15. Retrieved . 
  21. ^ "Capitol Facts". The Iowa Legislature. Archived from the original on 2013-08-14. Retrieved . 
  22. ^ "Kansas State Capitol, Topeka". SkyscraperPage.com. Retrieved . 
  23. ^ "Capitol, Frankfort". SkyscraperPage.com. Retrieved . 
  24. ^ "The Louisiana State Capitol Building". State of Louisiana. Archived from the original on 2013-09-08. Retrieved . 
  25. ^ "The State House". State of Maine. Retrieved . 
  26. ^ "The Maryland State House". State of Maryland. Retrieved . 
  27. ^ Estimate based on photograph
  28. ^ Kerry Chartkoff (February 28, 1992). "National Historic Landmark Nomination--Michigan State Capitol" (pdf). National Park Service. 
  29. ^ "Facts About the State Capitol". Minnesota Historical Society. Retrieved . 
  30. ^ "Mississippi State Capitol". Mississippi State Legislature. Retrieved . 
  31. ^ "Missouri's State Capitol". Missouri Secretary of State. Retrieved . 
  32. ^ "Montana State Capitol, Helena". SkyscraperPage.com. Retrieved . 
  33. ^ "Nebraska State Capitol". Nebraska State Government. Retrieved . 
  34. ^ "Nevada State Capitol, Carson City". SkyscraperPage.com. Retrieved . 
  35. ^ Norma Love (14 July 2013). "N.H. Statehouse Dome Getting a Golden Makeover". Concord Monitor. Archived from the original on 6 December 2015. Retrieved . 
  36. ^ "New Jersey State House, Trenton". SkyscraperPage.com. Retrieved . 
  37. ^ Estimate based on photograph.
  38. ^ "New York State Capitol, Albany". SkyscraperPage.com. Retrieved . 
  39. ^ "Capitol". North Carolina Department of Public Instruction. Archived from the original on 2012-08-31. Retrieved . 
  40. ^ "History of the State Capitol Complex". North Dakota State Department. Retrieved . 
  41. ^ "Ohio Statehouse". State of Ohio. Retrieved . 
  42. ^ "Capitol, Oklahoma City". SkyscraperPage.com. Retrieved . 
  43. ^ "Oregon State Capitol". Oregon Encyclopedia. Retrieved . 
  44. ^ Caffin, Charles Henry (1906). Handbook of the New Capitol of Pennsylvania. Harrisburg: Mount Pleasant Press. p. 13. Retrieved . 
  45. ^ Parker, J. Fred (1914). State of Rhode Island Manual. Providence: State of Rhode Island. p. iii. Retrieved . 
  46. ^ "Tour Outside the State House (The State House)". State of South Carolina. Archived from the original on 2014-04-26. Retrieved . 
  47. ^ "The South Dakota State Capitol Building". State of South Dakota. Retrieved . 
  48. ^ "Not-so-ordinary State Capitol is 150". Associated Press. Retrieved . 
  49. ^ Green, William Elton (December 2, 2015) [June 12, 2010]. "Capitol". Handbook of Texas (online ed.). Texas State Historical Association. ; "Texas State Capitol, Austin". SkyscraperPage.com. Retrieved . ; "Capitol Views". City of Austin Library. Retrieved . 
  50. ^ "Utah State Capitol Building". Utah Travel Industry. Archived from the original on 2013-10-11. Retrieved . 
  51. ^ "Vermont State House, Montpellier". SkyscraperPage.com. Retrieved . 
  52. ^ "Cupolas of Capitalism". Cupola Consulting. Retrieved . 
  53. ^ "Capitol Facts & History". Washington State Department of Enterprise Services. Retrieved . 
  54. ^ James E. Harding (April 11, 1974). "National Register of Historic Places Inventory-Nomination: West Virginia Capitol Complex / West Virginia State Capitol, West Virginia Executive Mansion" (PDF). West Virginia Capitol Complex. State of West Virginia, West Virginia Division of Culture and History, Historic Preservation. Retrieved . 
  55. ^ "State Capitol Building". Wisconsin Department of Administration. Retrieved . 
  56. ^ "Wyoming State Capitol Field Trip". Wyoming State Historical Society. Retrieved . 

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