Historic Oakwood
Get Historic Oakwood essential facts below. View Videos or join the Historic Oakwood discussion. Add Historic Oakwood to your Like2do.com topic list for future reference or share this resource on social media.
Historic Oakwood
Oakwood Historic District
Oakwood Confederate Cemetery in Raleigh, North Carolina.jpg
Oakwood Confederate Cemetery
Historic Oakwood is located in North Carolina
Historic Oakwood
Historic Oakwood is located in the US
Historic Oakwood
Location Roughly bounded by N. Boundary, Person, Jones, and Linden Sts., and Oakwood Cemetery, Raleigh, North Carolina
Coordinates 35°47?14?N 78°38?20?W / 35.78722°N 78.63889°W / 35.78722; -78.63889Coordinates: 35°47?14?N 78°38?20?W / 35.78722°N 78.63889°W / 35.78722; -78.63889
Area 190 acres (77 ha)
Architect Briggs, T.H; Et al.
Architectural style Second Empire, Queen Anne, Classical Revival
NRHP reference # 74001380[1] (original)
87001787 (increase 1)
87002235 (increase 2)
88003044 (increase 3)
Significant dates
Added to NRHP June 25, 1974
Boundary increases October 21, 1987
January 6, 1988
January 9, 1989

Historic Oakwood is a neighborhood in downtown Raleigh, North Carolina, United States, on the National Register of Historic Places, and known for its Historic Oakwood Cemetery, its many Victorian houses and its location close to the Mordecai Plantation Manor. Located near the Governor's Mansion and the State Capitol, during the 19th century Historic Oakwood was home to prominent members of Raleigh's society. It is Raleigh's earliest white middle-class suburb, and unlike later suburbs, it developed lot-by-lot over time, instead of by platted sections. Its Victorian-era architectural styles include Second Empire, Queen Anne, and Italianate. Later infill brought the bungalow, the American Foursquare, American Craftsman style, and the Minimal Traditional house to the area.[2][3][4][5]

Oakwood is also known for its Christmas Candlelight Tour, which opens private historic residences to the public, and the Garden Tour, which allows the public to see the vast gardens worked on by the Oakwood Gardening Club.[6]

Oakwood was listed on the National Register of Historic Places in 1974, with additions made in 1987, 1988, and 1989.[1] It is also one of six local historic overlay districts (HOD). Several Oakwood residences are also individually recognized as Local Historic Landmarks.

Gallery

See also

References

  1. ^ a b National Park Service (2010-07-09). "National Register Information System". National Register of Historic Places. National Park Service. 
  2. ^ Survey and Planning Unit Staff (May 1974). "Oakwood Historic District" (pdf). National Register of Historic Places - Nomination and Inventory. North Carolina State Historic Preservation Office. Retrieved . 
  3. ^ David R. Black (June 1987). "Linden Avenue Amendment to Oakwood Historic District" (pdf). National Register of Historic Places - Nomination and Inventory. North Carolina State Historic Preservation Office. Retrieved . 
  4. ^ Allison H. and David R. Black (May 1988). "Oakwood North Amendment to Oakwood Historic District" (pdf). National Register of Historic Places - Nomination and Inventory. North Carolina State Historic Preservation Office. Retrieved . 
  5. ^ David R. Black (August 1987). "Oakwood South Amendment to Oakwood Historic District" (pdf). National Register of Historic Places - Nomination and Inventory. North Carolina State Historic Preservation Office. Retrieved . 
  6. ^ "Welcome". The Society for the Preservation of Historic Oakwood. 

[1]

External links


  This article uses material from the Wikipedia page available here. It is released under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share-Alike License 3.0.


Historic_Oakwood
 



 

Top US Cities