Smelling Screen
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Smelling Screen

A smelling screen is a type of digital scent technology that combines a display screen, similar to a television or computer monitor, with an odor emitting device capable of pinpointing the smell to a specific portion of the displayed image. It is believed to be the first device to incorporate smells into a television screen,[1] though certainly not the first to synchronize smell with a displayed image (see Digital scent technology).

Description

The smelling screen combines a digital display with four small fans, one at each corner of the display. Odor stored in tiny gel packets is emitted and blown parallel to the screen.[2] By varying the speed and strength of each fan, an emitted odor is moved to a specific spot on the screen.[3] The fans operate at a very low speed, making it difficult for the user to perceive airflow; instead he or she perceives the smell as coming directly out of the screen and object displayed at that location.[4] According to the device's inventors, "The user can freely move his/her head to sniff at various locations on the screen, and can experience realistic changes in the odour intensity with respect to the sniffing location."[3]

Development

In 2013, a group of researchers from the Tokyo University of Agriculture and Technology unveiled a prototype smelling screen to the public at the ACM/IEEE Virtual Reality Conference.[3] The prototype device was only capable of dispensing one smell at a time.[3] In the future, the researchers hope to use a cartridge system to create a variety of smells on demand.[3]

Applications

The inventors of the smelling screen suggest that it could be used to enhance advertising displays and museum exhibits.[3] The product is in the early stages of development with no plans for commercial distribution in the near future.[4]

See also

References

  1. ^ Brian Sin (April 2, 2013). "The smell-o-vision TV implements scents with your favorite TV programs". Slash Gear. Retrieved 2013. 
  2. ^ "Smell-o-vision screens let you really smell the coffee". New Scientist. March 29, 2013. Retrieved 2013. 
  3. ^ a b c d e f Damien Gayle (April 2, 2013). "Real smell-o-vision TV unveiled by Japanese team (and it's NOT an April Fool)". Daily Mail. Retrieved 2013. 
  4. ^ a b Amanda Kooser (April 2, 2013). "Japanese scientists create 'Smell-O-Vision' screen". CNET. Retrieved 2013. 

External links


  This article uses material from the Wikipedia page available here. It is released under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share-Alike License 3.0.


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