Sumner County, Kansas
Sumner County, KS Events Directory
 
About Sumner County, KS
Sumner County, Kansas
County
Oxford Mill - front.jpg
Map of Kansas highlighting Sumner County
Location in the U.S. state of Kansas
Map of the United States highlighting Kansas
Kansas's location in the U.S.
Founded December 20, 1870
Named for Charles Sumner
Seat Wellington
Largest city Wellington
Area
 o Total 1,185 sq mi (3,069 km2)
 o Land 1,182 sq mi (3,061 km2)
 o Water 3.0 sq mi (8 km2), 0.3%
Population (est.)
 o (2016) 23,272
 o Density 20/sq mi (8/km²)
Congressional district 4th
Central: UTC-6/-5
Website co.Sumner.KS.us

Sumner County (standard abbreviation: SU) is a county located in the U.S. state of Kansas. As of the 2010 census, the population was 24,132.[1] Its county seat is Wellington.[2]

History

1915 Railroad Map of Sumner County

Early history

For many millennia, the Great Plains of North America was inhabited by nomadic Native Americans. From the 16th century to 18th century, the Kingdom of France claimed ownership of large parts of North America. In 1762, after the French and Indian War, France secretly ceded New France to Spain, per the Treaty of Fontainebleau. In 1802, Spain returned most of the land to France, but keeping title to about 7,500 square miles.

In 1803, most of the land for modern day Kansas was acquired by the United States from France as part of the 828,000 square mile Louisiana Purchase for 2.83 cents per acre. In 1848, after the Mexican-American War, the Treaty of Guadalupe Hidalgo with Spain brought into the United States all or part of land for ten future states, including southwest Kansas. In 1854, the Kansas Territory was organized, then in 1861 Kansas became the 34th U.S. state.

19th century

On February 26, 1867, Sumner County was created from parts of Marion County and Butler County. It was named in honor of Charles Sumner, a U.S. Senator from Massachusetts (1811-74), who was a strong advocate of Kansas becoming a free state.

In 1887, the Chicago, Kansas and Nebraska Railway built a branch line north-south from Herington to Caldwell.[3] This branch line connected Herington, Lost Springs, Lincolnville, Antelope, Marion, Aulne, Peabody, Elbing, Whitewater, Furley, Kechi, Wichita, Peck, Corbin, Wellington, Caldwell. By 1893, this branch line was incrementally built to Fort Worth, Texas. This line is called the "OKT". The Chicago, Kansas and Nebraska Railway was foreclosed in 1891 and was taken over by Chicago, Rock Island and Pacific Railway, which shut down in 1980 and reorganized as Oklahoma, Kansas and Texas Railroad, merged in 1988 with Missouri Pacific Railroad, and finally merged in 1997 with Union Pacific Railroad. Most locals still refer to this railroad as the "Rock Island".

21st century

In December 2011, the Kansas Star Casino opened approximately 4.5 miles (7.2 km) west of the center of Mulvane, adjacent to an exit on the Kansas Turnpike that was added in the mid 1980s. The casino is located a couple blocks west of the turnpike exit.[4]

Geography

According to the U.S. Census Bureau, the county has a total area of 1,185 square miles (3,070 km2), of which 1,182 square miles (3,060 km2) is land and 3.0 square miles (7.8 km2) (0.3%) is water.[5]

Adjacent counties

Demographics

Age pyramid

Sumner County is part of the Wichita, KS Metropolitan Statistical Area.

As of the census[11] of 2000, there were 25,946 people, 9,888 households, and 7,089 families residing in the county. The population density was 22 people per square mile (8/km²). There were 10,877 housing units at an average density of 9 per square mile (4/km²). The racial makeup of the county was 94.62% White, 0.71% Black or African American, 1.05% Native American, 0.22% Asian, 0.05% Pacific Islander, 1.29% from other races, and 2.06% from two or more races. 3.58% of the population were Hispanic or Latino of any race.

There were 9,888 households out of which 34.50% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 59.90% were married couples living together, 8.00% had a female householder with no husband present, and 28.30% were non-families. 25.60% of all households were made up of individuals and 12.40% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.58 and the average family size was 3.10.

In the county, the population was spread out with 28.50% under the age of 18, 7.50% from 18 to 24, 26.20% from 25 to 44, 22.40% from 45 to 64, and 15.50% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 38 years. For every 100 females there were 96.80 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 93.90 males.

The median income for a household in the county was $39,415, and the median income for a family was $46,739. Males had a median income of $36,616 versus $23,020 for females. The per capita income for the county was $18,305. About 7.20% of families and 9.50% of the population were below the poverty line, including 11.20% of those under age 18 and 6.80% of those age 65 or over.

Government

Presidential Elections Results[12]
Year Republican Democratic Third Parties
2016 71.8% 6,984 21.4% 2,076 6.8% 662
2012 68.5% 6,260 29.1% 2,658 2.4% 223
2008 65.2% 6,737 32.4% 3,353 2.4% 247
2004 67.6% 7,092 30.7% 3,217 1.7% 179
2000 60.4% 6,176 34.7% 3,549 5.0% 507
1996 54.2% 5,952 33.1% 3,638 12.6% 1,387
1992 35.3% 4,087 30.8% 3,564 34.0% 3,937
1988 53.7% 5,394 44.0% 4,417 2.3% 231
1984 64.3% 6,942 34.4% 3,708 1.3% 143
1980 57.5% 6,038 35.8% 3,761 6.6% 697
1976 44.9% 4,645 52.1% 5,385 3.0% 310
1972 68.1% 6,941 26.3% 2,685 5.6% 569
1968 54.5% 5,622 34.5% 3,562 11.0% 1,136
1964 45.6% 4,760 53.3% 5,574 1.1% 116
1960 61.5% 7,219 38.0% 4,462 0.5% 55
1956 63.0% 7,024 36.6% 4,088 0.4% 46
1952 69.0% 8,134 30.2% 3,567 0.8% 96
1948 55.4% 5,922 42.8% 4,571 1.8% 192
1944 59.9% 6,343 39.5% 4,187 0.6% 64
1940 51.9% 6,585 47.2% 5,988 1.0% 125
1936 38.2% 4,946 61.6% 7,966 0.2% 27
1932 42.4% 4,926 54.7% 6,353 2.9% 340
1928 79.6% 8,951 18.8% 2,108 1.6% 181
1924 54.9% 5,552 25.3% 2,556 19.8% 2,000
1920 60.5% 5,830 35.8% 3,454 3.7% 354
1916 39.4% 4,079 53.3% 5,519 7.4% 763
1912 12.2% 781 40.0% 2,557 47.8% 3,060[a]
1908 51.3% 3,235 44.0% 2,772 4.8% 299
1904 61.6% 3,264 28.1% 1,489 10.3% 545
1900 50.6% 3,184 47.4% 2,982 2.0% 125
1896 44.8% 2,515 54.2% 3,048 1.0% 56
1892 45.5% 3,503 54.5% 4,192
1888 49.7% 3,499 30.4% 2,139 19.9% 1,400

Following amendment to the Kansas Constitution in 1986, Sumner County remained a prohibition, or "dry", county until 1992, when voters approved the sale of alcoholic liquor by the individual drink with a 30 percent food sales requirement.[13]

Education

Unified school districts

Communities

2005 KDOT Map of Sumner County (map legend)

Cities

Census-designated place

Other unincorporated communities

Ghost towns

  • Adamsville
  • Bushnell
  • Cicero
  • Doster
  • Ewell[14]
  • Metcalf
  • Roland
  • Sumner City
  • Zyba

Townships

Sumner County is divided into thirty townships. The cities of Caldwell and Wellington are considered governmentally independent and are excluded from the census figures for the townships. In the following table, the population center is the largest city (or cities) included in that township's population total, if it is of a significant size.

See also

Notes

  1. ^ This total comprises 2,615 votes (40.87 percent) for Progressive Theodore Roosevelt (who carried the county) and 445 votes (6.96 percent) for Socialist Eugene V. Debs.

Further reading

Sumner County
Kansas

References

  1. ^ a b "State & County QuickFacts". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved 2014. 
  2. ^ "Find a County". National Association of Counties. Retrieved . 
  3. ^ Rock Island Rail History
  4. ^ Kansas Star Casino Plans To Open; The Wichita Eagle; December 7, 2011.
  5. ^ "US Gazetteer files: 2010, 2000, and 1990". United States Census Bureau. 2011-02-12. Retrieved . 
  6. ^ "Population and Housing Unit Estimates". Retrieved 2017. 
  7. ^ "U.S. Decennial Census". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved 2014. 
  8. ^ "Historical Census Browser". University of Virginia Library. Retrieved 2014. 
  9. ^ "Population of Counties by Decennial Census: 1900 to 1990". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved 2014. 
  10. ^ "Census 2000 PHC-T-4. Ranking Tables for Counties: 1990 and 2000" (PDF). United States Census Bureau. Retrieved 2014. 
  11. ^ "American FactFinder". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved . 
  12. ^ http://uselectionatlas.org/RESULTS
  13. ^ "Map of Wet and Dry Counties". Alcoholic Beverage Control, Kansas Department of Revenue. November 2006. Retrieved . 
  14. ^ Blackmar, Frank Wilson (1912). Kansas: A Cyclopedia of State History, Embracing Events, Institutions, Industries, Counties, Cities, Towns, Prominent Persons, Etc. Standard Publishing Company. p. 601. 

External links

County
Historical
Maps

Coordinates: 37°14?N 97°29?W / 37.233°N 97.483°W / 37.233; -97.483


  This article uses material from the Wikipedia page available here. It is released under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share-Alike License 3.0.


Sumner_County,_Kansas
 



 

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