Talk:Disruptive Innovation
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Disruption = "Creative Destruction"

I propose adding at the beginning a section on the concept of Creative Destruction. Christenson does not add or modify this well established term to be credited with the first to observe it. (He may, however, been the one to popularize the term "Disruption" for creative destruction) http://www.like2do.com/learn?s=Creative_destruction

VoIP

Why is VoIP listed as a disruptive technology that has displaced analog and fixed digital telephones? That battle is in its early phases and is nowhere near complete. I'm loathe to delete it without mentioning it here first. Comments? --Chairboy 01:36, 18 Aug 2004 (UTC)

I'll second the motion to remove Talk over IP; that seemed strange to me at first too.
Also, how does anyone feel about adding DVD as disrupting VHS? It seems like a good everyday example. It might not the best example of the theory, though, since DVDs have pretty much always been higher quality than VHS, they just happen to also be cheaper. Digitally compressed video replacing analog video is a definite example, but then less homespun. But anyway, I'm rambleing; any thoughts?Zombiejesus 02:28, 29 Aug 2004 (UTC)
VoIP is a good example of a disruptive tech yet to come, like it is mentioned how open source software *may* displace proprietary software. The fight is still taking place, although it does appear VoIP will come out on top.

DVD over VHS isn't too bad of an example, although larger business forces were at work; the media conglomerates overnight anointed the DVD as VHS's successor. All things being equal, the progression should have gone from VHS to Laserdisc to DVD to online video...it goes to show, the best guy doesn't always win. - quanta, Sep 17

In my view DVD over VHS is not a disruptive technology, since it´s neither cheaper nor lower in performance than the DVD. But, whatever --Preceding unsigned comment added by 62.220.4.218 (talk) 09:42, 4 July 2008 (UTC)

Cutting more items

Here's a few more I'm cutting. These are a little more borderline, so I'm saving the original text. If you disagree, find a source and drop it back in. ---- CharlesGillingham (talk) 20:20, 16 September 2010 (UTC)

Disruptive Innovation Displaced or Marginalized technology Notes WHY I CUT IT
Mobile VoIP GSM and Roaming VoIP technology over a Wi-Fi network can cost next to nothing for the user and the network used in data traffic on a unit basis; compared to the standard GSM network, especially for roaming calls. Where GSM providers would charge what is widely considered ludicrous pricing for services such as calling international countries, installing a small application on compatible mobile phones, can cost the user nothing.[]

However, this service cannot replace GSM fully, since it relies on the expansion of Wi-Fi enabled areas.[]

No citation. Does not argue that the market has been disrupted, but rather that the market will be or should be disrupted.

Solid state drive Hard disk drive The solid state drive has many benefits towards the hard disk drive[1]. SSDs have begun to appear in laptops, although as of 2009 they are substantially more expensive per unit of capacity than hard drives ($580 for a 256 GB SSD, vs. $50 for a similar size external USB HDD[2]). The price of SSD are dropping[3]. The SSD has replaced the Hard disk drive as the boot disk in the high end market. Again, this is a market that will be or should be disrupted. Also, it's not clear from the text that this is a disruptive innovation. To be disruptive, hard disk manufacturers would have to routinely assume that SSD drives will fail replace the hard disk. It has to be unexpected. The text doesn't say this. (If they are expecting it, then it is a "sustaining" innovation, not a "disruptive" innovation.)
Electric stove Gas stove Gas stoves for household use appeared in the 1880s. Electric stoves, independent of a gas source, came decades later. Though in many countries electric stoves became standard as a home substitute to the more expensive and bulky gas stoves, many professionals still prefer a steady, powerful gas flame.[] It doesn't seem to me that the market for gas stoves was ever seriously disrupted by the electrics. (See comments below)
Web Search Engine Directory based listing with improvements in document indexing techniques the digital media has taken a flat structure and relies on search capabilities to find a document. Earlier in late 90s the norm was to classify each item in directories or categories. In 2003 Google Inc, developed a high speed reliable search engine that provided easy way to search documents in digital media. By 2010 nearly 90% of internet applications rely on search rather than indexing. It has changed the way documents/files were organized.[] Not clear what market was disrupted, or that these technologies were directed at different markets in the first place.

Storage section is overpopulated by floppy drive technologies

Firstly, perhaps there is no need to list all the floppy iterations. This is redundant, and a whole lot of industries had an evolution chain where specific technologies superceded each other. In this case the improvement was mostly incremental and, in cases such as 3.5" vs 5.25", coexisted for years.

Another thing is that Bernoully/Zip/Jazz thing shouldn't be on the list: it wasn't even remotely as popular as floppies which it allegely disrupted, couldn't compete with them economically in lower-budget segments, and had fallen way behind very quickly once affordable CD-writers entered the market. This is incredibly similar to Sony's MiniDisc which was intended as a high-quality, high-performance replacement for audio cassette recording but failed to really disrupt anything: cassettes were cheap, easy to work with, and they played everywhere--and then CDs came and solved the dispute. There are other examples for this this kind of "failed disruptions", too. -- Preceding unsigned comment added by 87.238.97.38 (talk) 10:44, 24 September 2014 (UTC)

I agree about the the Bernoulli/Zip/Jazz. Disagree about the other drives, however -- these are Christensen's main example. It's normal for disruptive innovations to coexist with the product they will eventually replace. Two different companies are selling different products to different markets for some time, and then the disruption occurs when the low end market unexpectedly starts taking bites out of the high end market. ---- CharlesGillingham (talk) 00:09, 26 September 2014 (UTC)

Tags on article

Hi folks, nice work on this article but it has some significant flaws and I've tagged it for these reasons:

  1. It gives undue weight to Christiansen and cites his writings far too often
  2. The lead is too detailed and meandering it needs to be cut in half and say only what the topic is, not what the topic is not
  3. There is a lot of text that is unsourced. It my need to be removed if it is not sourced within a reasonable about of time.

Thanks for all your good work! Best, -- -- Keithbob o Talk o 13:41, 29 June 2015 (UTC)

Christensen identified the phenomenon, coined the term and defined it. This this is an article about his ideas.
I agree the lede is too long, however it does have to make clear "what it is not"; the term is so often misused, so getting the definition right is important. ---- CharlesGillingham (talk) 00:45, 5 July 2015 (UTC)

Cut Electric cars out, the whole 'Disruptive technology' section seems outdated

In 2009 electric cars were maybe considered by some to be a disruptive technology/innovation. Fast forward to the end of 2015 and they are anything but. We are still waiting for the actual disruption: new battery technology, new business model, anything. The whole section reads antiquated, like a remnant of a time past when e-cars seemed to be a sure thing. I would do it myself but I don't even have an english wikipedia account... 217.254.59.197 (talk) 15:41, 10 October 2015 (UTC)

2016 Update

I propose a few things to be added to the list:

  • Uber & Lyft disrupting the taxi cab industry
    • AirBnB disrupting the hotel industry
  • Blockchains disrupting currency?

Houdinipeter (talk) 02:12, 25 April 2016 (UTC)

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Pls add a "Digital disruption" section

From what I can see most current disruptive innovations are in the field of digital technologies (Internet-services etc). So could a "Digital disruption" section be added to the article that informs about this type of disruption and instances of it? It could be based upon on this section of the Digital Revolution article.

--Fixuture (talk) 15:57, 2 January 2017 (UTC)

Disruptive innovations are common outside of software. ---- CharlesGillingham (talk) 01:52, 6 May 2017 (UTC)

"create" versus "set" new markets

The first sentence mentions 'create new markets' which is partially true. But they more accurately 'set new markets' right? Like the automobile example. Or even the iPad, which wasn't the first tablet.

Food for thought. -- Preceding unsigned comment added by 216.183.156.151 (talk) 03:27, 12 January 2017 (UTC)

You're confusing new products with new markets. Disruptive innovations often take an existing product and sell it to a completely different set of consumers, using a different price point, different sales/distribution techniques, different advertising. ---- CharlesGillingham (talk) 01:50, 6 May 2017 (UTC)


Software development disruption

Domain driven design is now coming to be mature enough to disrupt the whole software industry, the programmers job may be automated and the business may evolve and refine the software solution independent of developers, MDriven and Capable objects are showing improvements in the magnitude of thousands in improvement and quality.

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