Tamas (philosophy)
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Tamas Philosophy

Tamas (Sanskrit tamas "darkness") is one of the three Gunas (tendencies, qualities, attributes), a philosophical and psychological concept developed by the Samkhya school of Hindu philosophy.[1] The other two qualities are rajas (passion and activity) and sattva (purity, goodness). Tamas is the quality of inertia, inactivity, dullness, or lethargy.

Etymology

The Vedic word támas refers to "darkness" and it is related to the Indo-European root *temH-, meaning "dark". It is related to Latin temere ("blindly"), Lithuanian tamsa ("darkness") and Russian t'ma ("darkness").

Hinduism

In Samkhya philosophy, a gu?a is one of three "tendencies, qualities": sattva, rajas and tamas. This category of qualities have been widely adopted by various schools of Hinduism for categorizing behavior and natural phenomena. The three qualities are:

  • Sattva is the quality of balance, harmony, goodness, purity, universalizing, holistic, positive, peaceful, virtuous.[2]
  • Rajas is the quality of passion, activity, being driven, moving, dynamic.[3][4]
  • Tamas is the quality of dullness or inactivelity, apathy, inertia or lethargy.[5][3]

In Indian philosophy, these qualities are not considered as present in either-or fashion. Rather, everyone and everything has all three, only in different proportions and in different contexts.[1] The living being or substance is viewed as the net result of the joint effect of these three qualities.[1][4]

According to the Samkya school, no one and nothing is either purely Sattvic, Rajasic or Tamasic.[4] One's nature and behavior is a complex interplay of all of these, with each guna in varying degrees. In some, the conduct is Rajasic with significant influence of Sattvic guna, in some it is Rajasic with significant influence of Tamasic guna, and so on.[4]

Sikhism

The Sikh scripture refers to Tamas in its verses:

  • "The Fourteenth Day: One who enters into the fourth state, overcomes time, and the three qualities of raajas, taamas, and satva"(SGGS [1])
  • "Those who embody the energies of sattva-white light, raajas-red passion, and taamas-black darkness, abide in the Fear of God, along with the many created forms." (SGGS [2])
  • "Your Power is diffused through the three gunas: raajas, taamas and satva" (SGGS [3])
  • "Raajas, the quality of energy and activity; Taamas, the quality of darkness and inertia; and Satvas, the quality of purity and light, are all called the creations of Maya, Your illusion. That man who realizes the fourth state - he alone obtains the supreme state" (SGGS [4])

See also

References

  1. ^ a b c James G. Lochtefeld, Guna, in The Illustrated Encyclopedia of Hinduism: A-M, Vol. 1, Rosen Publishing, ISBN 9780823931798, page 265
  2. ^ Alter, Joseph S., Yoga in modern India, 2004 Princeton University Press, p 55
  3. ^ a b Feuerstein, Georg The Shambhala Encyclopedia of Yoga, Shambhala Publications, 1997
  4. ^ a b c d Alban Widgery (1930), The principles of Hindu Ethics, International Journal of Ethics, Vol. 40, No. 2, pages 234-237
  5. ^ Whicher, Ian The Integrity of the Yoga Dar?ana, 1998 SUNY Press, 110

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Tamas_(philosophy)
 



 

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