United States Men's National Ice Hockey Team
United States
USA Hockey.svg
Nickname(s) Team U.S.A., Ice Yanks
Association USA Hockey
General Manager Jim Johannson
Head coach Tony Granato
Assistants Keith Allain
Chris Chelios
Ron Rolston
Scott Young
Captain Connor Murphy
Most games Mark Johnson (151)
Most points Mark Johnson (146)
Team colors               
IIHF code USA
US national team jerseys 2016 (WCH).png
Ranking
Current IIHF 5 Decrease1
Highest IIHF 4 (2016)
Lowest IIHF 7 (first in 2003)
First international
 United States 29-0 Switzerland  
(Antwerp, Belgium; April 23, 1920)
Biggest win
 United States 31-1 Italy 
(St. Moritz, Switzerland; February 1, 1948)
Biggest defeat
 Sweden 17-2 United States 
(Stockholm, Sweden; March 12, 1963)
 Soviet Union 17-2 United States 
(Stockholm, Sweden; March 15, 1969)
IIHF World Championships
Appearances 70 (first in 1930)
Best result Gold medal world centered-2.svg Gold: 2 (1933, 1960)
Canada Cup / World Cup
Appearances 8 (first in 1976)
Best result Gold medal world centered-2.svg Winner: 1 (1996)
Olympics
Appearances 21 (first in 1920)
Medals Gold medal.svg Gold (1960, 1980)
Silver medal.svg Silver (1920, 1924, 1932, 1952, 1956, 1972, 2002, 2010)
Bronze medal.svg Bronze: (1936)
International record (W-L-T)
473-428-81
Medal record
Gold medal - first place Team
Gold medal - first place Team
Silver medal - second place Team
Silver medal - second place Team
Silver medal - second place Team
Silver medal - second place Team
Silver medal - second place Team
Silver medal - second place Team
Silver medal - second place Team
Silver medal - second place Team
Bronze medal - third place Team
Gold medal - first place
Silver medal - second place
Silver medal - second place
Silver medal - second place
Silver medal - second place
Bronze medal - third place
Bronze medal - third place
Bronze medal - third place
Bronze medal - third place
Bronze medal - third place
Bronze medal - third place

The United States men's national ice hockey team is based in Colorado Springs, Colorado, with its U18 and U17 development program in Plymouth, Michigan. The team is controlled by USA Hockey, the governing body for amateur and Olympic ice hockey in the United States. The US team is ranked 4th in the IIHF World Rankings.[1] The current head coach is Jeff Blashill.[2]

The United States won gold medals at the 1960 and 1980 Winter Olympics and more recently, silver medals at the 2002 and 2010 Winter Olympics. The United States won the 1996 World Cup of Hockey but was unable to defend its title at the 2004 World Cup of Hockey, losing to Finland in the semifinals, and was ousted before group play finished in the 2016 Cup. The team's most recent medal at the World Championships came with a bronze in 2015. They won the tournament in 1933.

United States is a member of the so-called "Big Six", the unofficial group of the six strongest men's ice hockey nations, along with Canada, the Czech Republic, Finland, Russia, and Sweden.[3]

As of 2014, the US has a registered ice hockey population of 611,926 with USA Hockey.[4]USA Hockey is the largest governing body for ice hockey in the United States and is considered the best representation of the number of players playing ice hockey in the US.[5]

History

The American ice hockey team's greatest success was the "Miracle on Ice" at the 1980 Winter Olympics in Lake Placid, New York when they defeated the heavily favored Soviet Union on the way to a gold medal. Though hockey is not a major sport in most areas of the United States, the "Miracle" is often listed as one of the all-time greatest American sporting achievements. The United States also won the gold medal in the 1960 Games at Squaw Valley, California, defeating the Soviet Union, Canada, Czechoslovakia, and Sweden along the way. However, since this victory is not as well known as the 1980 win, it has come to be known as the "Forgotten Miracle".[6][7]

U.S. hockey experienced a spike in talent in the 1980s and 1990s, with future National Hockey League (NHL) stars including Tony Amonte, Chris Chelios, Derian Hatcher, Brett Hull, Pat LaFontaine, John LeClair, Brian Leetch, Mike Modano, Mike Richter, Jeremy Roenick, Kevin Stevens, Keith Tkachuk, and Doug Weight. Although the United States finished no higher than fourth in any World or Olympic event from 1981 through 1994, the Americans did win the 1996 World Cup with a squad of NHL players. Six years later, after the International Olympic Committee (IOC) and NHL arranged to allow NHL players to participate in the Olympic Games, the United States earned a silver medal at the 2002 Winter Olympics with a roster that included NHL stars Adam Deadmarsh, Chris Drury, Brian Rafalski, and Brian Rolston. But by 2006, many of these NHL All-Stars had retired or had declined with age. Though the 2006 Olympic team finished a disappointing 8th, it was more of a transitional team, featuring young NHL players like Rick DiPietro, John-Michael Liles, and Jordan Leopold.

The 2010 U.S. Olympic team was composed of much younger and faster players than teams of previous years, including David Backes, Dustin Brown, Jack Johnson, Patrick Kane, Phil Kessel, Zach Parise, Joe Pavelski, Bobby Ryan, Paul Stastny, and Ryan Suter. The team also had a solid group of veterans that included top NHL goalie Ryan Miller top defenseman Brian Rafalski and U.S. Olympic Team Captain Jamie Langenbrunner. The U.S. team upset team Canada 5-3 in the round-robin phase of the tournament and went into the single elimination phase of the tournament as the number-one seeded team. After beating Finland 6-1 the United States advanced to the gold medal game, where they lost in overtime 3-2 to Canada to claim the silver medal. The gold medal game between Canada and the United States was watched by an estimated 27.6 million U.S. households. This was the most watched hockey game in America since the 1980 "Miracle on Ice" game, including any Stanley Cup Final or NHL Winter Classic broadcast.[8]

However, several months later at the IIHF World Championship, the U.S. team posted the worst record in its history by losing all three of its games in the preliminary round. The losses eliminated the United States from medal contention and dropped them below 12th place. Only three wins in the relegation round, including a shootout win over Italy, prevented the United States from being relegated to Division I and gave Team USA a chance to play for the IIHF World Championship in 2011.

Tournament record

Olympic Games

Year Result
1920 Silver
1924 Silver
1932 Silver
1936 Bronze
1948 disqualified
1952 Silver
1956 Silver
1960 Gold
1964 5th place
1968 6th place
1972 Silver
1976 5th place
1980 Gold
1984 7th place
1988 7th place
1992 4th place
1994 8th place
1998 6th place
2002 Silver
2006 8th place
2010 Silver
2014 4th place
Totals
Games Gold Silver Bronze Total
21 2 8 1 11

World Championship

See: Ice Hockey World Championships and List of IIHF World Championship medalists
Note: Between 1920 and 1968, the Olympic hockey tournament was also considered the World Championship for that year.[9]
  • 1920 - Won Silver medal
  • 1924 - Won Silver medal
  • 1931 - Won Silver medal
  • 1932 - Won Silver medal
  • 1933 - Won Gold medal
  • 1934 - Won Silver medal
  • 1936 - Won Bronze medal
  • 1938 - Finished in 7th place
  • 1939 - Won Silver medal
  • 1940-46 - Not held[10]
  • 1947 - Finished in 5th place
  • 1948 - Finished in 4th place
  • 1949 - Won Bronze medal
  • 1950 - Won Silver medal
  • 1951 - Finished in 6th place
  • 1952 - Won Silver medal
  • 1955 - Finished in 4th place
  • 1956 - Won Silver medal
  • 1958 - Finished in 5th place
  • 1959 - Finished in 4th place
  • 1960 - Won Gold medal
  • 1961 - Finished in 6th place
  • 1962 - Won Bronze medal
  • 1963 - Finished in 8th place
  • 1964 - Finished in 5th place
  • 1965 - Finished in 6th place
  • 1966 - Finished in 6th place
  • 1967 - Finished in 5th place
  • 1968 - Finished in 6th place
  • 1969 - Finished in 6th place
  • 1970 - Finished in 7th place (Won "Pool B")
  • 1971 - Finished in 6th place
  • 1972 - Finished in 8th place (2nd in "Pool B")[11]
  • 1973 - Finished in 8th place (2nd in "Pool B")
  • 1974 - Finished in 7th place (Won "Pool B")
  • 1975 - Finished in 6th place
  • 1976 - Finished in 4th place
  • 1977 - Finished in 6th place
  • 1978 - Finished in 6th place
  • 1979 - Finished in 7th place
  • 1980 - Not held[12]
  • 1981 - Finished in 5th place
  • 1982 - Finished in 8th place
  • 1983 - Finished in 9th place (Won "Pool B")
  • 1984 - Not held[12]
  • 1985 - Finished in 4th place
  • 1986 - Finished in 6th place
  • 1987 - Finished in 7th place
  • 1988 - Not held[12]
  • 1989 - Finished in 6th place
  • 1990 - Finished in 5th place
  • 1991 - Finished in 4th place
  • 1992 - Finished in 7th place
  • 1993 - Finished in 6th place
  • 1994 - Finished in 4th place
  • 1995 - Finished in 6th place
  • 1996 - Won Bronze medal
  • 1997 - Finished in 6th place
  • 1998 - Finished in 12th place
  • 1999 - Finished in 6th place
  • 2000 - Finished in 5th place
  • 2001 - Finished in 4th place
  • 2002 - Finished in 7th place
  • 2003 - Finished in 13th place
  • 2004 - Won Bronze medal
  • 2005 - Finished in 6th place
  • 2006 - Finished in 7th place
  • 2007 - Finished in 5th place
  • 2008 - Finished in 6th place
  • 2009 - Finished in 4th place
  • 2010 - Finished in 13th place
  • 2011 - Finished in 8th place
  • 2012 - Finished in 7th place
  • 2013 - Won Bronze medal
  • 2014 - Finished in 6th place
  • 2015 - Won Bronze medal
  • 2016 - Finished in 4th place
  • 2017 - Finished in 5th place

Canada Cup

  • 1976 - Finished in 5th place
  • 1981 - Finished in 4th place, lost semi-final
  • 1984 - Finished in 4th place, lost semi-final
  • 1987 - Finished in 5th place
  • 1991 - Finished in 2nd place, lost final

World Cup

Others

Team

Current roster

Roster for the 2017 IIHF World Championship.[17]

Head coach: Jeff Blashill

No. Pos. Name Height Weight Birthdate Team
5 D Murphy, ConnorConnor Murphy - C 1.93 m (6 ft 4 in) 96 kg (212 lb) (1993-03-26) March 26, 1993 (age 24) United States Arizona Coyotes
6 D Brickley, DanielDaniel Brickley 1.91 m (6 ft 3 in) 93 kg (205 lb) (1995-03-30) March 30, 1995 (age 22) United States Minnesota State Univ.
7 F Compher, J. T.J. T. Compher 1.82 m (6 ft 0 in) 87 kg (192 lb) (1995-04-08) April 8, 1995 (age 22) United States Colorado Avalanche
8 D Trouba, JacobJacob Trouba 1.91 m (6 ft 3 in) 92 kg (203 lb) (1994-02-26) February 26, 1994 (age 23) Canada Winnipeg Jets
9 F Copp, AndrewAndrew Copp 1.85 m (6 ft 1 in) 93 kg (205 lb) (1994-07-08) July 8, 1994 (age 23) Canada Winnipeg Jets
10 F Bjork, AndersAnders Bjork 1.82 m (6 ft 0 in) 82 kg (181 lb) (1996-08-05) August 5, 1996 (age 21) United States Univ. of Notre Dame
12 F Greenway, JordanJordan Greenway 1.98 m (6 ft 6 in) 104 kg (229 lb) (1997-02-16) February 16, 1997 (age 20) United States Boston Univ.
13 F Gaudreau, JohnnyJohnny Gaudreau 1.73 m (5 ft 8 in) 72 kg (159 lb) (1993-08-13) August 13, 1993 (age 24) Canada Calgary Flames
14 F Bjugstad, NickNick Bjugstad 1.98 m (6 ft 6 in) 99 kg (218 lb) (1992-07-17) July 17, 1992 (age 25) United States Florida Panthers
15 F Eichel, JackJack Eichel 1.88 m (6 ft 2 in) 89 kg (196 lb) (1996-10-28) October 28, 1996 (age 20) United States Buffalo Sabres
17 F Schmaltz, NickNick Schmaltz 1.82 m (6 ft 0 in) 80 kg (180 lb) (1996-02-23) February 23, 1996 (age 21) United States Chicago Blackhawks
18 F Dvorak, ChristianChristian Dvorak 1.82 m (6 ft 0 in) 85 kg (187 lb) (1996-02-02) February 2, 1996 (age 21) United States Arizona Coyotes
19 F Keller, ClaytonClayton Keller 1.79 m (5 ft 10 in) 76 kg (168 lb) (1998-07-29) July 29, 1998 (age 19) United States Arizona Coyotes
21 F Larkin, DylanDylan Larkin - A 1.85 m (6 ft 1 in) 86 kg (190 lb) (1996-07-30) July 30, 1996 (age 21) United States Detroit Red Wings
25 D McAvoy, CharlieCharlie McAvoy 1.85 m (6 ft 1 in) 96 kg (212 lb) (1997-12-21) December 21, 1997 (age 19) United States Boston Bruins
26 F Hayes, KevinKevin Hayes 1.96 m (6 ft 5 in) 100 kg (220 lb) (1992-05-08) May 8, 1992 (age 25) United States New York Rangers
27 F Lee, AndersAnders Lee 1.91 m (6 ft 3 in) 103 kg (227 lb) (1990-07-03) July 3, 1990 (age 27) United States New York Islanders
29 F Nelson, BrockBrock Nelson - A 1.91 m (6 ft 3 in) 93 kg (205 lb) (1991-10-15) October 15, 1991 (age 25) United States New York Islanders
35 G Howard, JimmyJimmy Howard 1.85 m (6 ft 1 in) 99 kg (218 lb) (1984-03-26) March 26, 1984 (age 33) United States Detroit Red Wings
37 G Hellebuyck, ConnorConnor Hellebuyck 1.93 m (6 ft 4 in) 94 kg (207 lb) (1993-05-19) May 19, 1993 (age 24) Canada Winnipeg Jets
40 G Petersen, CalCal Petersen 1.91 m (6 ft 3 in) 86 kg (190 lb) (1994-10-19) October 19, 1994 (age 22) United States Univ. of Notre Dame
55 D Hanifin, NoahNoah Hanifin 1.91 m (6 ft 3 in) 93 kg (205 lb) (1997-01-25) January 25, 1997 (age 20) United States Carolina Hurricanes
57 D van Riemsdyk, TrevorTrevor van Riemsdyk 1.88 m (6 ft 2 in) 85 kg (187 lb) (1991-07-24) July 24, 1991 (age 26) United States Chicago Blackhawks
65 D DeKeyser, DannyDanny DeKeyser 1.91 m (6 ft 3 in) 87 kg (192 lb) (1990-03-07) March 7, 1990 (age 27) United States Detroit Red Wings
76 D Skjei, BradyBrady Skjei 1.91 m (6 ft 3 in) 93 kg (205 lb) (1994-03-26) March 26, 1994 (age 23) United States New York Rangers

IIHF World Championship directorate awards

The IIHF has given awards for each year's championship tournament to the top goalie, defenseman, and forward (all since 1954), and most valuable player (since 2004). The following USA team members have won awards.

See also

References

  1. ^ World Ranking
  2. ^ [1]
  3. ^ "NHL announces World Cup of Hockey for 2016". The Canadian Press. 2015-01-24. Retrieved 2015. 
  4. ^ http://www.usahockey.com/page/show/839306-membership-statistics
  5. ^ http://unitedstatesofhockey.com/2014/06/17/u-s-hockey-participation-numbers-for-2013-14/
  6. ^ Burnside, Scott (2010-02-08). "Hockey's miracle before the 'Miracle'". ESPN. Retrieved . 
  7. ^ "The Morning Skate: The Forgotten Miracle of 1960". New York Times. 2009-12-11. Retrieved . 
  8. ^ "Hockey Game Seen by 27.6 Million" New York Times, 1 March 2010. Retrieved 1 March 2010
  9. ^ See: Ice Hockey World Championships.
  10. ^ See Ice Hockey World Championships#1930-1953: Canadian dominance. World War II forced the cancellation of the 1940 and 1944 Winter Olympics and the world championships from 1941 to 1946. "International hockey timeline". International Ice Hockey Federation. Retrieved .  (ed.) Carl Diem (January 1940). "The Fifth Olympic Winter Games Will Not Be Held" (PDF). Olympic Review. Berlin: International Olympic Institute (8): 8-10. Retrieved . 
  11. ^ See: 1972 World Ice Hockey Championships. For the first time, a separate tournament is held for both the World Championships and the Winter Olympics. Previously, the Winter Olympics tournament was held in lieu of a world championships, with the winner being declared world champion for that year. It also marked the first time in international ice hockey that all goaltenders were required to wear face masks.
  12. ^ a b c No championships were held during the Olympic years 1980, 1984, and 1988. See: Ice Hockey World Championships#1976-1987: First years of open competition and List of IIHF World Championship medalists.
  13. ^ USA Hockey Deutschland Cup Archives Archived October 4, 2006, at the Wayback Machine.
  14. ^ 2003&2004 Deutschland Cup
  15. ^ 2005 Deutschland Cup
  16. ^ USA Hockey Deutschland/TUI Cup results Archived October 4, 2006, at the Wayback Machine.
  17. ^ 2017 IIHF World Championship roster

External links


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United_States_men's_national_ice_hockey_team