Warren County, Virginia
Warren County, VA Events Directory
 
About Warren County, VA
Warren County, Virginia
Warren County Courthouse cropped.JPG
Warren County Courthouse in Front Royal, Virginia
Seal of Warren County, Virginia
Seal
Map of Virginia highlighting Warren County
Location in the U.S. state of Virginia
Map of the United States highlighting Virginia
Virginia's location in the U.S.
Founded 1836
Named for Joseph Warren
Seat Front Royal
Largest town Front Royal
Area
 o Total 217 sq mi (562 km2)
 o Land 213 sq mi (552 km2)
 o Water 3.3 sq mi (9 km2), 1.5%
Population (est.)
 o (2016) 39,181
 o Density 184/sq mi (71/km²)
Congressional district 6th
Eastern: UTC-5/-4
Website www.warrencountyva.net

Warren County is a U.S. county located in the Commonwealth of Virginia. The 2010 census places Warren County within the Washington-Arlington-Alexandria, DC-VA-MD-WV Metropolitan Statistical Area with a population of 37,575.[1] The county seat is Front Royal.[2]

History

By 1672 the entire Shenandoah Valley was claimed for hunting by the Iroquois Confederation following the Beaver Wars. Some bands of the Shawnee settled in the area as client groups to the Iroquois and alternately to the Cherokee after 1721. The Iroquois formally sold their entire claim east of the Alleghenies to the Virginia Colony at the Treaty of Lancaster in 1744.[3] Warren County was established in 1836 from Frederick and Shenandoah counties.[4]:33 At that time the county had a population of 7,000 people, a quarter of which were enslaved.[4]:289 Wedding records show marriages of people born in the 1770s marrying in the 1800s who head households of four to eight "free colored" so the early demographics of the population are unclear.[5]:823-824 Joist Hite lead the Sixteen Families into the Lower Shenandoah Valley.[6] Some consider that group the first European settlers of the area, others believe different claims.[6]:ix Either way, Presbyterians of Scotch-Irish lineage and Quakers followed.[7]

Rail service was established in 1854 with the construction of the Alexandria, Orange and Manassas Gap Railroad between Manassas and Riverton. This line was soon extended to Strasburg in time to become a factor in the Battle of Front Royal on May 23, 1862 and throughout the Civil War. Lumber, agriculture, manufacturing and grain mills provided employment in the region for decades after the Civil War. The county is named for Joseph Warren. During the Civil War the Battle of Front Royal took place in the county on May 23, 1862.[8]:368 On September 23, 1864 William Thomas Overby and five others of then Lt. Col. John S. Mosby's 43rd Virginia Battalion of Partisan Rangers were captured by cavalry troops under the command of then Brig. Gen. George A. Custer in Front Royal out of uniform and were executed as spies.[9]

Geography

Warren and adjacent counties

According to the U.S. Census Bureau, the county has a total area of 217 square miles (560 km2), of which 213 square miles (550 km2) is land and 3.3 square miles (8.5 km2) (1.5%) is water.[10] The highest point is Hogback Mountain in Shenandoah National Park, along the border with Rappahannock County.

Adjacent counties

National protected areas

Demographics

As of the census[16] of 2000, there were 31,584 people, 12,087 households, and 8,521 families residing in the county. The population density was 148 people per square mile (57/km²). There were 13,299 housing units at an average density of 62 per square mile (24/km²). The demographics of the county is (2000) 92.71% White, 4.83% Black or African American, 0.27% Native American, 0.43% Asian, 0.02% Pacific Islander, 0.46% from other races, and 1.29% from two or more races. 1.56% of the population were Hispanic or Latino of any race.

There were 12,087 households out of which 32.80% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 55.60% were married couples living together, 10.00% had a female householder with no husband present, and 29.50% were non-families. 24.00% of all households were made up of individuals and 8.80% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.57 and the average family size was 3.04.

In the county, the population was spread out with 25.60% under the age of 18, 7.60% from 18 to 24, 30.60% from 25 to 44, 23.90% from 45 to 64, and 12.30% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 37 years. For every 100 females there were 96.70 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 94.90 males.

The median income for a household in the county was $42,422, and the median income for a family was $50,487. Males had a median income of $37,182 versus $25,506 for females. The per capita income for the county was $19,841. About 6.00% of families and 8.50% of the population were below the poverty line, including 8.70% of those under age 18 and 10.40% of those age 65 or over.

Transportation

  • Front Royal Area Transit (FRAT)[17] provides weekday transit for the town of Front Royal.
  • Page County Transit[18] - the People Movers provides weekday transit for the town of Luray and weekday service between Luray and Front Royal.

Major highways

Education

Colleges

Preparatory school

Public K-12 schools

Communities

Politics

Presidential Elections Results[25]
Year Republican Democratic Third Parties
2016 65.6% 11,773 28.8% 5,169 5.6% 1,009
2012 59.1% 9,869 38.6% 6,452 2.3% 377
2008 55.1% 8,879 43.4% 6,997 1.6% 250
2004 61.1% 8,600 37.3% 5,241 1.6% 227
2000 56.7% 6,335 38.6% 4,313 4.6% 518
1996 48.3% 4,657 39.5% 3,814 12.2% 1,181
1992 44.6% 4,319 36.7% 3,554 18.6% 1,803
1988 61.9% 4,700 36.4% 2,769 1.7% 129
1984 65.7% 5,016 33.4% 2,551 0.8% 64
1980 55.8% 3,861 37.5% 2,597 6.7% 462
1976 45.8% 2,985 49.4% 3,221 4.8% 311
1972 69.4% 3,718 28.2% 1,508 2.5% 131
1968 43.4% 2,297 28.6% 1,513 28.1% 1,486
1964 43.0% 1,886 56.8% 2,494 0.2% 10
1960 49.5% 1,842 49.7% 1,850 0.8% 28
1956 58.8% 2,003 38.8% 1,322 2.4% 80
1952 57.9% 1,888 41.8% 1,362 0.3% 11
1948 40.9% 1,016 52.0% 1,291 7.1% 176
1944 42.3% 761 57.5% 1,034 0.2% 3
1940 26.8% 491 73.0% 1,338 0.2% 4
1936 26.6% 426 73.2% 1,174 0.3% 4
1932 24.9% 367 74.5% 1,096 0.6% 9
1928 44.3% 564 55.7% 710
1924 16.9% 150 78.7% 699 4.4% 39
1920 28.3% 293 69.6% 720 2.0% 21
1916 26.5% 214 72.2% 583 1.2% 10
1912 16.5% 122 77.2% 571 6.4% 47

Notable residents

See also

References

  1. ^ a b "State & County QuickFacts". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved 2014. 
  2. ^ "Find a County". National Association of Counties. Retrieved . 
  3. ^ Hofstra, Warren (2005). The Planting of New Virginia: Settlement and Landscape in the Shenandoah Valley. Baltimore, MD: The Johns Hopkins University Press. pp. 10-12. ISBN 0801882710. 
  4. ^ a b Wayland, John Walter (1969). A History of Shenandoah County, Virginia. Genealogical. p. 894. 
  5. ^ Heinegg, Paul (2005). Free African Americans of North Carolina, Virginia, and South Carolina from the Colonial Period to about 1820, Volume 2. Genealogical. 
  6. ^ a b Kemp Cartmell, Thomas (1909). Shenandoah Valley Pioneers and Their Descendants: A History of Frederick County, Virginia (illustrated) from Its Formation in 1738 to 1908. Eddy. p. 587. 
  7. ^ Presbyterians:
    Kemp Cartmell, Thomas (1909). Shenandoah Valley Pioneers and Their Descendants: A History of Frederick County, Virginia (illustrated) from Its Formation in 1738 to 1908. Eddy. p. 587. :ix
    Quakers:
    Kretzschmar, William A. (Sep 15, 1993). Handbook of the Linguistic Atlas of the Middle and South Atlantic States. University of Chicago Press. p. 454. :334
  8. ^ Forman, Sam (Nov 21, 2011). Dr. Joseph Warren: The Boston Tea Party, Bunker Hill, and the Birth of American Liberty. Pelican. p. 400. 
  9. ^ Executions:
    Simson, Jay W. (Nov 11, 2008). Custer and the Front Royal Executions of 1864. McFarland. p. 211. :1
    Boyle, William E. (Spring 1994). "Under the Black Flag: Execution and Retaliation in Mosby's Confederacy". Military Law Review. 144. :155
  10. ^ "US Gazetteer files: 2010, 2000, and 1990". United States Census Bureau. 2011-02-12. Retrieved . 
  11. ^ "Population and Housing Unit Estimates". Retrieved 2017. 
  12. ^ "U.S. Decennial Census". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved 2014. 
  13. ^ "Historical Census Browser". University of Virginia Library. Retrieved 2014. 
  14. ^ "Population of Counties by Decennial Census: 1900 to 1990". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved 2014. 
  15. ^ "Census 2000 PHC-T-4. Ranking Tables for Counties: 1990 and 2000" (PDF). United States Census Bureau. Retrieved 2014. 
  16. ^ "American FactFinder". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved . 
  17. ^ "Front Royal Area Transit". Retrieved 2017. 
  18. ^ Page County Transit
  19. ^ "Welcome to A.S. Rhodes Elementary". Retrieved 2017. 
  20. ^ "Welcome to E. Wilson Morrison Elementary". Retrieved 2017. 
  21. ^ "Welcome to Hilda J. Barbour Elementary". Retrieved 2017. 
  22. ^ "Welcome to Leslie Fox Keyser Elementary". Retrieved 2017. 
  23. ^ "Welcome to Ressie Jeffries Elementary". Retrieved 2017. 
  24. ^ "Welcome to Warren County Middle School". Retrieved 2017. 
  25. ^ http://uselectionatlas.org/RESULTS
  26. ^ Genealogical and Memorial Encyclopedia of the State of Maryland: A Record of the Achievements of Her People in the Making of a Commonwealth and the Founding of a Nation, Volume 2. American Historical Society, Inc. 1919. pp. 439-442. 

Coordinates: 38°55?N 78°13?W / 38.91°N 78.21°W / 38.91; -78.21


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Warren_County,_Virginia
 



 

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