William Morgan (architect)
William Morgan
Born (1930-12-14)December 14, 1930
Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, US
Died January 18, 2016(2016-01-18) (aged 85)
Nationality American
Alma mater Harvard University
Occupation Architect
Bunny (1958-2016; his death)
Awards House & Home Award of Merit
Florida AIA Design Honor Award
H.J. Klutho Lifetime achievement Award
Dickinson Hall entrance at the University of Florida

William Newton Morgan, Sr. (December 14, 1930 - January 18, 2016) was an American architect and author, based in Jacksonville, Florida.[1] Three of his designs are included on the Florida Association of the American Institute of Architects list of Florida's top 100 buildings (The Williamson House in Ponte Vedra Beach; Morgan's residence in Atlantic Beach; and Dickinson Hall at the University of Florida, formerly the Museum of Natural History). He has written five books including his most recent, Earth Architecture (2008). In 2012 the University of Florida awarded Morgan an honorary doctor of arts degree as well as the first recipient of its School of Architecture's Lifetime Achievement Award. Morgan has been described as a pioneer of sustainable design.[2]

Morgan grew up in Jacksonville and graduated with a bachelor's degree from Harvard University before serving in the U.S. Navy during the Korean War. After the war he returned to Harvard to study architecture. He studied in Italy on a Fulbright Scholarship (U.S.-Italy Fulbright Commission) and then returned to Jacksonville in 1961 to open his architecture practice. in the city where he had grown up.[2]

Morgan's five books cover the architecture of pre-industrial cultures, including those in pre-Columbian North America and Micronesia.[2] He died in Jacksonville after a long illness on January 18, 2016, aged 85.[3]

Works

Wing of the Hyatt Regency Hotel in Jacksonville, Florida. Formerly the Daniel State Office Building

See also

References

  1. ^ "Florida Registered Voters". FLVOTERS dot COM. Retrieved 2016. 
  2. ^ a b c d e f g "University of Florida honors architect William Morgan with a Lifetime Achievement Award". Jacksonville.com. Retrieved . 
  3. ^ a b "William Morgan, influential Jacksonville architect and expert on ancient designs, dies at 85". Jacksonville.com. Retrieved . 
  4. ^ "Williamson Residence (AIA Florida Top 100 Buildings)". Aiaflatop100.org. Retrieved . 
  5. ^ "Florida Museum of Natural History / Formerly Florida Museum of Natural Sciences (AIA Florida Top 100 Buildings)". Aiaflatop100.org. Retrieved . 
  6. ^ "William Morgan: Selected and Current Works," by Robert McCarter (2002)
  7. ^ "William Morgan House (AIA Florida Top 100 Buildings)". Aiaflatop100.org. Retrieved . 

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William_Morgan_(architect)



 

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